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Street Hockey

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NEWS
February 12, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Laurence Kesterson
At Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, the street-hockey-a-thon this year benefits St. Christopher's Hospital for Children and the Make-a-Wish Foundation of Southeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | By Monica L. Williams, Special to The Inquirer
About 13 teenage boys showed up at the Rockledge Borough Council's monthly meeting this week to ask permission to use borough tennis, volleyball and basketball courts for street-hockey games. But the council on Monday denied their request to use the courts at the Rockledge Community Center, saying that the asphalt tennis courts were not appropriate for roller-skating and that the courts and nets would be damaged. The council also denied the boys' request to convert the tennis and basketball courts into hockey courts.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | By Kerry Lippincott, Special to The Inquirer
A controversy over whether children should be allowed to play street hockey on Jonathan Drive in Caln Township is still not resolved, as far as one resident is concerned. Clara Bessick told the Township Board of Commissioners on Thursday night that children playing on Jonathan Drive are interfering with her smooth passage to her home on the road, in the northwestern section of the township. Bessick said the children playing in the street "don't move when they see me coming or they move slowly.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Roskow of Middletown calls herself a "product of the 60s. " As such, Roskow believes equal rights includes kids, as well as adults. Last month, Roskow wrote a letter to the editor about a rights problem in her subdivision, Tareyton Estates. She talked about "an epidemic" that was sweeping the country. "Yes, it's worse than teen alcohol abuse, more addicitve than crack," she wrote. Pretty heady stuff. The problem that's plaguing Roskow's neighbhood, however, isn't crime.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
The nine members of the Snipers street-hockey team had to warm up a little more than usual on a recent Saturday before they could face off against the Owls from Lumberton. The seven-team league doesn't have a grounds crew - which is why the Snipers had to come to their home rink on an abandoned tennis court two hours before the scheduled 1:30 p.m. game time to shovel snow and ice. But the effort, said Andy Dick, was worth it, since the Snipers won 6-4 against the Owls from the Sunnybrook development in Lumberton.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ice time at hockey rinks in Delaware County is limited and expensive, so droves of Eric Lindros or John LeClair wanna-bes often just drag a portable net out onto a local roadway and play on pavement, instead. Some youth recreation organizations are harnessing that energy, taking the "street" out of street hockey by transferring it to an enclosed playing surface with organized games played under adult supervision. The new sport, which also takes advantage of the growing popularity of in-line skating, is called roller hockey.
NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
Associate Pastor Lloyd Parks of the Faith Bible Church in Medford said he has fond memories of when he was growing up and he used to play street hockey in the township. "It was just a bunch of us guys who got together and played pickup games on a rink the township had behind the municipal building," Parks recalled. Over the years, as larger rinks were constructed in other municipalities such as Cherry Hill, area youths started losing interest in playing street hockey locally, he said.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
You know them. You've seen them. They are the ones standing at the end of your car hood unaware of anyone or anything around them except the game. They are street hockey players whose court is the suburban street and whose passion for the game makes the playing season all year long. "I like street hockey because it is competitive," said George Kopishke, 15, who plays outside his Upper Providence Township home. "I play ice hockey when I get the chance, but mostly I play street hockey with my friends all year, whenever I get a chance.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leave behind the neon lights of Main Street, Manayunk. Duck down the narrow road that juts behind the old stone factories, past the old sodden men in the shadows watching the young ladies strut and slide to new nightspots. Rattle across the nondescript bridge, across the weedy old railroad track and deep into the dark of the island. Bound almost blindly over rocks and pocks and mounds of dirt as the trees and brush grow thicker, and the blanket of crickets wraps tighter. Here in the midst of metropolitan Philadelphia is a slice of seclusion.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | by Drew McQuade, Daily News Sports Writer
The Mayfair Stars ball hockey team had heard all the jokes about North Jersey, but this was ridiculous. The stench was enough to pop open the eyes of Rip Van Winkle. Someone from the Normandy Vipers had tossed a dead raccoon halfway into their hotel room. It was stuck teeth-first on their windowsill with the tail dangling outside. The Stars followed an unwritten rule they have about most uninvited guests: They threw the raccoon onto someone else's balcony. Said John Barger, captain of the Stars: "It was dead, so it stunk real bad. It didn't jinx us or anything.
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NEWS
February 13, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JASON WENTZELL, who has been a Philadelphia police officer for 17 years, grew up playing roller hockey at the Fishtown Rec Rink and firmly believes it saved his life. "There's two paths to go down in this neighborhood," the lifelong Fishtowner said. "As a kid, I hung around with a rough crowd. Some of them went one way. A lot of them went the other way. "I lived two, three blocks away from the rink," Wentzell continued. "As soon as school was out, we'd go right over there. I was a lot better off playing hockey than hanging on the street corner.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Young was not, as it turned out, unstoppable. But for most of his 52 years, he certainly seemed to be. Persevering through two bouts of Hodgkin disease as a teenager, he pursued his education until he had a master's and worked his way into a top administrative post in the New Jersey court system. Evenings and weekends found him on Moorestown's athletic fields, mobbed by children. In fall, he coached soccer; in winter, street hockey; in spring, soccer again; then baseball and roller hockey.
SPORTS
January 3, 2012 | BY CHUCK BAUSMAN, bausmac@phillynews.com
THE WINTER CLASSIC is hockey on steroids - arctic-chilled, hot chocolate-warmed, maybe with a touch of brandy. It is faces red from the cold, noses even redder. Mother Nature must be a hockey fan because she brought ideal hockey weather - 41.1 degrees at faceoff (and dropping) with brisk, very brisk, winds. And in the second period, yes, snow flurries. Flyers fans poured into Citizens Bank Park yesterday, worshiping a makeshift rink that lay on top of a baseball diamond. They were there for their Flyers and the hockey, of course, but they shared equal love for the surroundings and the event taking place.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Wafiq is very gifted musically. The enterprising 13-year-old taught himself to play both drums and bass guitar. And his talents are not limited to music. He has an abundance of energy, which he channels into a variety of sports - football, soccer, street hockey, and lacrosse. Wafiq is fascinated by any mode of transportation, including bike, scooter, and Rollerblades. In addition, like many of his peers, he spends many hours testing his skills at video games. Wafiq does well in school and benefits from the support and direction he receives.
NEWS
July 25, 2010
   "I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was 12. Jesus, does anyone?" - from "Stand by Me " Chris Gibbons is a writer from Philadelphia My friend Vinnie and I would often sit on the red brick wall in front of my house on warm summer nights in 1975. We would talk into the night about our coming freshman year at Roman Catholic High School, the long SEPTA bus ride into Center City, and the changes that would soon be upon us. The little world we knew was about to get a lot bigger, and we both sensed the innocence of our adolescence fading as the long shadows of the summer twilight crept across our street each evening to merge with the inevitable darkness.
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By BROAD STREET BULLY as told to DAN GERINGER, bully@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
Broad Street Bully spent last night embedded in the orange-blooded flood of his fellow Flyers fans at Chickie's & Pete's in South Philly, watching the Flyers lose a 2-1 heartbreaker in Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Finals, floating on a sea of $2 drafts, still passionately pining for a parade. HEAR NO EVIL: Cliff Brenner, 57, and Scott Beinstein, 49, Flyered-up friends from Northeast Philadelphia, watched the game on the big-screen TV with earphones in both ears, listening to the play-by-play on radio.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
STREET hockey was once the stick ball of suburbia. In the Philly suburbs in the early 1970s, it was an after-school sport that lots of kids played. The Flyers were the rage, and we each had orange and black jerseys emblazoned with our favorite players' names and numbers. We'd imitate Bernie Parent and Bobby Clarke. And every class bully became the team's Dave Schultz. A guy in my neighborhood took metal from a swing set and made two goals, using sewn-together burlap bags for netting.
SPORTS
October 4, 2008 | by Bob Cooney
We're bringing you a new item on the South Jersey sports scene, called "5 Minutes With. " We will take a little time to learn some things about the high school athletes that you wouldn't normally find in a game story. The first subject is Triton senior quarterback Rocco Colucci. FAVORITE PRO SPORTS TEAM: The Flyers. I never played ice hockey, but I've always played street hockey. FAVORITE SPORTS TO WATCH ON TV: College football. My favorite team is Penn State. FAVORITE REALITY SHOW: I don't watch any of the reality shows, so I can't say I have a favorite.
NEWS
May 22, 2008 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
IKNOW that what I'm about to say will earn me a Philly razzing. Wimp, you'll call me. Maybe use the word Vince Fumo used to describe Sen. Jubelirer a few years back. Or even the moniker of the Soprano mobster killed on Tony's boat a few seasons ago. But I'm going to say it anyway: There's way too much fighting in professional hockey. It's a brawl dressed up as a hockey game. If I wanted to see a fight, I'd go the Blue Horizon or Atlantic City - not the Wachovia Center.
SPORTS
April 5, 2006 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New York Rangers wanted to end seven seasons of playoff absences. All they needed was a point. The Flyers wanted to move ahead of them atop the Atlantic Division with a victory in regulation. Those were the stakes last night at Madison Square Garden. When it was over, the Rangers had a 3-2 shoot-out victory, giving them 96 points - three more than the Flyers with seven games to play. "I felt we played a good game," said Flyers goalie Robert Esche, who continued to make a case for himself as the playoff starter with 38 saves.
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