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Street Life

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NEWS
February 19, 1995 | By Barbara Claire Kasselman, FOR THE INQUIRER
"What can we absolutely not miss?" they ask as they pour off the planes at Logan and queue up at the information booths. The fun of Faneuil Market? Fashionable Newbury Street? The USS Constitution? Well, sure, if you have a week. You don't want to miss the full fun and beauty of Boston. But if you have only a weekend, and if you want to be sure to catch the true heartbeat of the city, you absolutely can't miss the Vittoria. Take a tip from sons and lovers who make it to town every chance they get - "Let's go to the Vittoria," they always say. We locals meet there on every excuse we can find.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The up-and-coming rapper Meek Mill says he would like nothing more than to be on the road touring all the time. "My best thing is to stay traveling," the 25-year-old North Philadelphia street rapper said Friday. "Every time I come back to Philadelphia, someone tries to shoot me or get me back in trouble. " But ties to the past are hard to cut - especially the one with your probation officer. So the troubled relationship between Meek Mill, né Robert Williams, and Philadelphia probation officer Treas Underwood was the subject of another long, contentious hearing before Common Pleas Court Judge Genece E. Brinkley.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mattie Hudson says she tried hard to protect her five children as they grew up surrounded by sporadic violence and the narcotics trade in one of the city's most troubled public-housing developments. Hudson, a single mother, now 53, lived in the McCaffery Village development on Chester's West End for 25 years, until not long before it was demolished last year to make way for new housing. She was active on the tenant council there and involved with her children. She is a volunteer and a board member at a charter school in Chester that her daughter attends.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Linda "Lavender" Hogan spent the last decade of her life pushing a shopping cart and collecting tin cans on the streets of North Philadelphia. She never thought she'd live to see 55. This mother of three had spent more than 10 years abusing drugs and living the street life, neighbors said. But on Monday, she finally celebrated that elusive birthday. She visited relatives and partied with friends, before she fell asleep for the last time on the steps of a rowhouse on Opal Street near York, a notorious drug corner.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Combine a first-rate screenwriter with a brilliantly innovative director and it's often hard to fairly apportion the credit for the finished movie. For example, do some of those memorable scenes in My Beautiful Laundrette and Sammy and Rosie Get Laid owe more to the way Hanif Kureishi wrote them or to the approach that Stephen Frears took in filming them? A tantalizing but incomplete answer comes in London Kills Me, which marks Kureishi's confident directing debut. As befits a writer taking his first step behind the camera, Kureishi's movie is whimsically constructed around a quixotic search for a pair of shoes.
NEWS
February 26, 2007
WOMEN who have children with fathers who are locked up should do everything in their power to keep the child and father in touch. Let them build a relationship so that when he returns to society, they will have a bond. We've all heard that the system is designed to break the bond of kinship in black families. But it doesn't have to be that way if we make a way for them to talk on the phone, see each other, write letters. Don't allow anything to come between a possible loving relationship.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
TROY K. SMITH Jr., 23, of East Mount Airy, hoped to pursue a career in criminal justice, but became a victim of a deadly crime himself. And now, those who knew him are going to march for justice. "I never thought anything like this [could happen] before. Never in my life. I've had death in my family, but it was never tragic like this," said his mother, Renee Whitmore, 41. Smith was her first-born child and only son. His parents described him as a "family man. " He didn't have children, but was known for the love he had for his relatives.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | By Linda Wright Moore
Five people, 18 to 22, gather to rap about rap - to explain the strong appeal of the violent, despairing messages of the late, great Tupac Shakur and Christopher "Notorious B.I.G. " Wallace, a/k/a Biggie Smalls. It is familiar territory for the group, an ad hoc "creative team" at Motivational Education Productions, a West Philadelphia-based communications firm that specializes in getting through to urban youth. The young men and women are "bridge people" - demographically members of the hip-hop generation who personally have experienced and transcended the most destructive aspects of rap culture.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Looking at the scenes of New York street life that John Sloan drew and painted in the first decade of this century, it's difficult to understand how some of his contemporaries could have considered them vulgar and indecent. By today's standards, Sloan's slices of life seem so matter-of-fact as to be almost ingenuous, which is one of the problems that Ashcan realism - what this kind of art was dubbed by its critics - presents when it's viewed eight decades after the fact. We can't simulate the social climate that made a Sloan painting of a working-class woman carrying a bucket of beer through Manhattan's Tenderloin district seem so dissolute 80 years ago. So we follow the path of least resistance by responding to these paintings and prints nostalgically - as charming stimuli to warm reminiscence about the good old days of nickel beer.
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NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
TROY K. SMITH Jr., 23, of East Mount Airy, hoped to pursue a career in criminal justice, but became a victim of a deadly crime himself. And now, those who knew him are going to march for justice. "I never thought anything like this [could happen] before. Never in my life. I've had death in my family, but it was never tragic like this," said his mother, Renee Whitmore, 41. Smith was her first-born child and only son. His parents described him as a "family man. " He didn't have children, but was known for the love he had for his relatives.
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The up-and-coming rapper Meek Mill says he would like nothing more than to be on the road touring all the time. "My best thing is to stay traveling," the 25-year-old North Philadelphia street rapper said Friday. "Every time I come back to Philadelphia, someone tries to shoot me or get me back in trouble. " But ties to the past are hard to cut - especially the one with your probation officer. So the troubled relationship between Meek Mill, né Robert Williams, and Philadelphia probation officer Treas Underwood was the subject of another long, contentious hearing before Common Pleas Court Judge Genece E. Brinkley.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The up-and-coming rapper Meek Mill says he would like nothing more than to be on the road touring all the time. "My best thing is to stay traveling," the 25-year-old North Philadelphia street rapper said Friday. "Every time I come back to Philadelphia, someone tries to shoot me or get me back in trouble. " But ties to the past are hard to cut - especially the one with your probation officer. So the troubled relationship between Meek Mill, né Robert Williams, and Philadelphia probation officer Treas Underwood was the subject of another long, contentious hearing before Common Pleas Court Judge Genece E. Brinkley.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Mike Vitez
The Inquirer is presenting one profile a day of participants in Sunday's Blue Cross Broad Street Run. See full coverage at www.philly.com/broadstreetrun. By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER In 2009, in his Chester County kitchen, Tom Kramer turned frustration and desperation into inspiration. He would turn what he loved — running, training — into a cause that could save the life of his wife, Pam, and the lives of many like her. Pam has a rare form of blood cancer, myelofibrosis, that eats away at her bone marrow and will eventually be fatal.
TRAVEL
February 12, 2012 | By Stu Bykofsky, For The Inquirer
CHIANG RAI, Thailand - No one asked the elephants, or their mahouts. In 1989, to halt the rape of its thick forests, Thailand banned the centuries-old industry of logging. The result: Logging was stopped (legal logging, anyway) - and thousands of elephants suddenly found themselves jobless. This was less of a problem for the elephants than for their gobsmacked mahouts (owners), who faced the challenge of providing their elephants with about 500 pounds of food a day with no source of income.
NEWS
August 17, 2009 | By Traver Riggins INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had no idea what they were getting into when they enrolled in a pilot documentary filmmaking class at Villanova University in January. One clue could have been their professor telling them on the first day that they should aim to meet Academy Awards standards "just in case. " The goal sounded simple: Tell a story with film (in one semester) about positive change in the Philadelphia area. But 15 English, political science, communications, and engineering majors, many without previous film experience, did more than make a social-justice documentary.
NEWS
July 26, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"How you doin', sister?" Khalil Robinson calls to a young woman passing his stand in the lunchtime rush. "I got a new author here. " Behind Robinson, the self-described "Philly Book Man," sits his large display of street lit - books with glossy covers of scantily clad women, men in hoodies, shiny cars, and stacks of money, and titles suggesting tales of sordid excess. On a smaller, lonelier display are a few books written by an Illinois senator who's running for president.
NEWS
June 24, 2007 | By Dale Mezzacappa, FOR THE INQUIRER
As a teenager, Majovie Bland couldn't imagine spending the rest of his life anywhere near that patch of urban pathos called Mantua. On the wings of a free college education, with George Weiss as his mentor and Donald Trump as his muse, he was getting out. First stop, the University of Hartford. Today, at 32, Bland has his bachelor's degree in economics and finance - but no intention of abandoning the old neighborhood. What changed everything was a bullet. His mother still lives in West Philly with his younger half-brother, in a first-floor apartment with a ramp to the sidewalk.
NEWS
February 26, 2007
WOMEN who have children with fathers who are locked up should do everything in their power to keep the child and father in touch. Let them build a relationship so that when he returns to society, they will have a bond. We've all heard that the system is designed to break the bond of kinship in black families. But it doesn't have to be that way if we make a way for them to talk on the phone, see each other, write letters. Don't allow anything to come between a possible loving relationship.
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