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Street Signs

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NEWS
July 25, 1991 | By Karen Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
As many as 50 street signs are missing in Mount Ephraim, Mayor Harry Covely Jr. said, and the borough doesn't have enough money to buy new ones. "They just started deteriorating around six years ago either from vandalism, the weather or cars hitting them," the mayor said in an interview last week. "They never got replaced. Now you've got to give directions by saying, 'Go down to the third block and make a left.' " The signs were put up by the local Lions Club. It put them up a second time and a third time, Lions Club president Hugh Devlin said.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Jerry Post didn't waste any time making his presence felt on the Ivyland Borough Council. One of the first things Post did Wednesday night after being unanimously approved to fill Mary Mackelburg's unexpired term was volunteer to make new signs for borough streets. "I think it's an important issue," said Post, a member of the borough's Planning Commission. "Our street signs have deteriorated over the years. I'm willing to make the signs if someone else will paint and letter them.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Vandalism of street signs has become a costly problem in Upper Darby Township's Drexel Park section. During the last few months, vandals have removed several dozen street and traffic signs, according to Councilman Richard Gentile. During the council's business meeting Wednesday, Gentile warned that anyone caught tampering with the signs would be punished. "We intend to prosecute to the full extent of the law," he said. Punishment would be paying the cost of damage plus a fine, which varies.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | BY VERONICA JONES
I moved to South Philadelphia three months ago from the Washington, D.C., area, and I cannot say enough positive things about living in Philadelphia. The city has an attitude all its own - including a surprising amount of patience and tolerance - and is full of character and a sense of community. I have been hearing a lot about Philadelphia and tourism - especially about making the Republican National Convention a positive event and ensuring Philadelphia earns a place in the hearts of the thousands of visitors.
NEWS
September 25, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Street signs with names such as Carol Lane and Hannah Avenue are a popular target for thieves in East Norriton Township these days, and local officials have responded with an informal ban on future streets named for women. "Don't get us wrong, we're not becoming a male-dominated township here and we're not wanting to violate anyone's civil rights," township manager Helmuth J. Baerwald said in an interview this week. "But on the other hand, it's a costly enterprise. " Baerwald said that the township, which has a population of about 16,000, has already exceeded this year's $6,500 budget for sign replacements by more than $3,000, and he attributes that largely to thefts.
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lower Merion Township is no longer required to replace historical street signs with modern reflective signs that are easier to see, officials said Tuesday. The decision was made by U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood in response to lobbying by U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey and township officials who argued against the change. "I extend my sincere thanks to Secretary LaHood for his prompt cooperation and flexibility in allowing Lower Merion Township to keep its beloved historical street signs," Toomey (R., Pa.)
NEWS
August 4, 1986 | BY MATALIE K. LEVANT
We have lived in the Olney area for 24 years. Our four children were graduated from Lowell Elementary School at 5th and Nedro, and a great deal of our time and our money has been spent in this community. We support the Korean people in their effort to erect street signs, and we commend them for their energetic, positive contributions to this community. Unfortunately, that is now academic, because following a neighborhood meeting at which I was the lone dissenter, every single Korean street sign was either damaged or defaced with spray paint.
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | By STEVEN A. MARQUEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
In a private meeting Tuesday night, Olney community leaders told Korean leaders that they still wanted the removal of the now-vandalized Korean- language street signs along the 5th Street business strip. Korean leaders said they would have to consult the 60 board members of the Korean Association of Greater Philadelphia - and possibly the city's entire Korean community - before they could act on the signs. "We'd like to discuss the matter with the people that are concerned," said Hyon Chong "Charlie" Choe, president of the association.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
George Brown reacted instantly when he saw a teen on a bike get hit by a car on the Clementon-Berlin Road that rainy Dec. 23 night. Brown, driving his own car the opposite way along the wet road, picked up his mobile phone and dialed 911 for an ambulance. But when a police dispatcher asked him for the location, the Sicklerville man couldn't tell them where he was: the street sign had been painted over. Since early fall, residents in the western portion of the borough had been living without street signs.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lower Merion Township is no longer required to replace its historical street signs with modern reflective signs that are easier to see, officials said Tuesday. The decision was made by U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood in response to lobbying by U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) and township officials who argued against the change. "I extend my sincere thanks to Secretary LaHood for his prompt cooperation and flexibility in allowing Lower Merion Township to keep its beloved historical street signs," Toomey said in a news release.
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NEWS
February 28, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it a mayoral race mystery. Just how did former State Sen. T. Milton Street Sr. come to sign the nomination petition for former City Councilman James F. Kenney last week? Both are candidates for the Democratic nomination for mayor in the May 19 primary. Brian Villa, a Democratic committeeman from West Philadelphia's 27th Ward, said he attended a "petition party" last week at Ladder 15, a Center City bar. There, Villa said, he circulated nomination petitions for Kenney's mayoral campaign, Helen Gym's bid for City Council at-large, and Carol Jenkins' bid for the Board of City Commissioners.
TRAVEL
July 27, 2014 | By Stu Bykofsky, For The Inquirer
TUMON BAY, Guam - It's a tropical island where the streets have no names and the trees have no birds. The place "where America's day begins" (as they like to say), Guam is a Micronesian dot 1,200 miles east of the Philippines, known mostly to those Americans who served in the Pacific during World War II, or to Vietnam-era military who passed through. A U.S. territory since it was ceded after the Spanish-American War, hot and hilly Guam is small (180,000 population) and manageable (30 miles long and 9 miles wide)
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Esam Mohamed, Associated Press
BANI WALID, Libya - Libya's government declared Wednesday that it had taken control of one of the last strongholds of deposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi's loyalists, as its fighters in the heart of the city fired their guns into the air to celebrate victory after fierce battles that left dozens dead and thousands displaced. The capture of Bani Walid, about 90 miles southeast of Tripoli, was a triumph for the government that replaced Gadhafi's regime. But the length of time it took the government to secure the town - a full year - underlined the difficulties faced by the new regime in imposing its authority over squabbling tribes and heavily armed militias.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
NEW YORK (not really) - On a crisp April day in 2010, Bradley Cooper could be found at the corner of 19th and Market, outside Philadelphia's Marathon Grill, making a movie. A bystander edged across the cables, through the phalanx of walkie-talkie-slinging production assistants, and approached the star. "We were rolling film, and right as he walked by he whispered 'Fake! ' - and then he walked away," Cooper recalls with a laugh. "Only in Philly. " As it happens, the guy had a point.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wharton, Morris, Meade, Rittenhouse, and McKean. The names were familiar to Pete Hoskins when he was Philadelphia streets commissioner in the 1980s and '90s. They topped signposts that flashed by as he drove through the city. Hoskins saw the names again while touring Laurel Hill Cemetery as its president and chief executive officer three years ago. They were cut into ornate headstones, obelisks, and mausoleums. And that gave him an idea. Why not tell the stories of these movers and shakers who were honored in Philadelphia by having streets and institutions named after them?
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
IN 1965, Mel Dorn was a 21-year-old husband and father who had just gotten fired from his job as a spot-welder after 29 days. "The manager told me I was the best worker he'd ever had," said Dorn. But the company's owner didn't want to pay the union wages required if welders worked for 30 days or longer. "I was so mad, I wanted to do something before I blew up," Dorn, now 67, said this week. That anger led Dorn - the same day he was fired - to join a protest that famed civil-rights activist Cecil B. Moore was leading outside a bar that had refused to allow a black truck driver to make deliveries.
TRAVEL
April 1, 2012
We travel lovers of a certain age and experience already know most of the rules: Pack light - you likely won't need that foofy blouse or any of the family jewels anywhere, but don't forget the sunscreen and passport. But here are our "10 Travel Commandments for Seniors Who Want a Trip to Remember (In a Good Way, of Course). " 1. Thou shalt study up before you go. For starters, read everything you can put your hands on about your destination. It will enhance the trip no end if you know something about the culture, history, and food you will encounter.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Mutter Street, monuments to the murdered stand like altars. Four memorials have sprouted from the pavement of this North Philadelphia street in the last three years, including one last week for Reyna Aguirre Alonso, 29, a deli clerk shot execution-style, possibly because she was a witness to an earlier killing on this drug-plagued street. Around 7:40 p.m. Monday, a man in a ski mask entered the market and, without a word, shot Alonso four times. He took nothing. Police have not named a suspect in her killing, but on Friday, the Philadelphia Police Fugitive Task Force and FBI arrested Jorge Aldea, 23, of North Philadelphia, in the November slaying of Louis Chevere.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
Pat Toomey is a Republican U.S. senator from Pennsylvania Over the last year, I have traveled across the commonwealth listening to the concerns of hardworking Pennsylvanians - employees, small-business owners, entrepreneurs - and the message is too often the same: Government is getting in our way. Today, excessive government regulations are making it difficult and more expensive for employers to hire and create jobs. Federal red tape is imposing burdensome, unfunded mandates on local cities, townships, and counties.
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