CollectionsStreet Theater
IN THE NEWS

Street Theater

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 4, 1995
A friend writes: "As a longtime, hard-core devotee of the Mummers Parade, I don't have a strong opinion on which street the parade is on. What continues to strike me is the dullness of the parade at street level. "At one point Sunday, about 2 p.m., I (just a spectator) crossed Market Street around 10th; the parade route was empty from 7th Street to 11th Street. Four quiet blocks in a nine-block parade - that's pathetic, and it's solely the fault of the Mummers, not the shift to Market Street this year, not Mayor Rendell.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an airplane hangar-size Mantua warehouse that looks like a workshop for whimsical, subversive elves, Adam Cook is painting blocky figures on fabric panels that will become the pages of a giant book. "It's a very old form of street theater," says the tall, bearded Cook, member of a Vermont-based theater group. The book's text, on the theme of liberation, will be performed by a chorus and narrator. Painted sections of cardboard are stacked in a corner of the skylit warehouse, to be assembled into 135 skeletons (the number of executions in Texas since George W. Bush became governor)
LIVING
September 9, 1998 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deep in the heart of the Black Rock Desert, where plants don't grow and phones don't ring and the sun beats mercilessly on the hard, beige, cracked earth, a man walked barefoot on the pancake-flat ground, wearing nothing but a woman's white slip, pulled up high. On a cherry-red mountain bike, a bare-breasted woman in a tutu whooshed by, just as a straw-roofed tropical barroom on wheels hurtled around the corner, packed with waving revelers on stools. Tents made of Indian fabrics and parachute silk flapped in the wind, and the air filled with the eerie strains of a warped, reverberating "Star-Spangled Banner" performed by a young man on cello, accompanied by a synthesizer and a bleary-eyed audience of four.
NEWS
July 27, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Mime is mime and street theater is street theater and never the twain shall meet. That, at least, is what I think Kevin O'Connor was getting at when he dropped by to explain the whys and wherefores of Clean Street Theatre. For nearly 10 years O'Connor, 34, originally of Upper Darby and more recently of Wyndmoor, was a member of the mime team trading as Quiet Riot, a popular attraction on the college and civic culture circuits. This summer, through Sept. 19, he is project director for five street theater troupes operated by Movement Theatre International under contract to PhilaPride Inc., the keep-Philadelphia-clean activators.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer
IT SEEMS that drama and Occupy Philly go together like green eggs and ham. The group returned Thursday after a long winter of planning and organizing to perform its Dr. Seuss-inspired "The Fat Cat in the Hat: A Wells Fargo Unfair-y Tale. " Using a rhyme scheme similar to the iconic author's, the "street theater" chronicled Occupy's feud with Wells Fargo, which had 14 of its members arrested in November during a sit-in. "We're asking who the real criminals are: concerned citizens who want to reveal corruption or banks using predatory, racist loans that force families out of their homes," said Aaron Torisi, the performance's organizer.
NEWS
September 10, 2002 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
In the dark, you will see 10 shadowy performers, oversized iron gates, stilt-walkers, searchlights. As each hour-long performance ends, the performers burn the set down, an apocalyptic conflagration, only to rebuild it the next day. An allegory about war, dominance and destruction, Carmen Funebre (or Funeral Song) was created in response to the conflict in Bosnia, and for the last eight years, the Polish theater company Teatr Biuro Podrozy (Travel Agency Theater) has traveled the world with this large-scale theatrical spectacle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1986 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a Woody Allen Film Festival continuing through Sept. 20 at the Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St., with 14 of the little man's most memorable cinematic adventures. Call 922-1010 for the schedule. PLATTER CHATTER There's a record convention , 4p.m.-11 p.m., at the Holiday Inn, (Airport), I-95 at Essington Exit. Buy, sell or trade rock, jazz, soul, country, soundtracks or hard-to-get oldies. Admission: $2. Info: 747-7360. ART EXHIBIT An exhibit of drawings and paintings by Carmine Travagline continues through Oct. 25 at the Peak Gallery at Montserrat, 623 South St. Travagline also happens to be the chef at Montserrat and is known for his creations in the kitchen, too. The gallery is open daily.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill George, the producing director of Touchstone Theater, speaks in a dry, matter-of-fact tone that tends to mask his considerable enthusiasm for his job and his strong passion for theater. So when he says of the theater's new home, "I'm a little worn out about being happy. I've been so happy for so long now, about a month, I just can't take it anymore," he comes across sounding as though, maybe, he is not really that happy at all. But allowing for a bit of self-deprecating sarcasm, it is clear that George is indeed very pleased with the new theater on the working-class south side of this city on the Lehigh River east of Allentown.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | BY MICHAEL ELKIN, For the Daily News
WEST Philadelphia-born and -raised, Colman Domingo makes no pretense of passing as a prince of Bel-Air. No need to; at 43, he's more a poobah of film and stage. And he's got the credits to prove it, from Steven Spielberg's recent, Oscar-winning "Lincoln" to Spike Lee's "Passing Strange," a 2009 film based on a play that Domingo appeared in and won an off-Broadway Obie Award for. You'll also see him this fall in Lee Daniels' "The Butler," about White House butler Eugene Allen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013
Theater 11th Hour Theatre Company: Passing Strange The story of a young man searching for a sense of identity & the human connections forged by art. Closes 1/21. Off-Broad Street Theater at First Baptist Church, 1636 Sansom St.; 267-987-9865. www.11thhourtheatrecompany.org . $25; $15 students. A Chorus Line Behind-the-scenes look at the lives of struggling Broadway performers. Closes 2/9. Eagle Theatre, 208 Vine St., Hammonton, NJ; 609-704-5012. $25. A Delicate Balance A suburban couple's lives are turned upside down when they wind up hosting unexpected houseguests.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Molly Eichel and Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S BEEN A GOOD YEAR for the Azuka Theatre. Turns out, when people know where you are, they're more likely to come see your show. This was the first season Azuka had a permanent home, at the Off-Broad Street Theater at First Baptist Church; previously, the company bounced around venues across the city. "Having a permanent space makes a difference," said Azuka producing artistic director Kevin Glaccum. "You come see one show, and you know exactly where the next one is going to be. " Azuka is among a number of local companies that this year have extended their seasons past Memorial Day. Azuka's last show this season continues through Sunday.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer
IT SEEMS that drama and Occupy Philly go together like green eggs and ham. The group returned Thursday after a long winter of planning and organizing to perform its Dr. Seuss-inspired "The Fat Cat in the Hat: A Wells Fargo Unfair-y Tale. " Using a rhyme scheme similar to the iconic author's, the "street theater" chronicled Occupy's feud with Wells Fargo, which had 14 of its members arrested in November during a sit-in. "We're asking who the real criminals are: concerned citizens who want to reveal corruption or banks using predatory, racist loans that force families out of their homes," said Aaron Torisi, the performance's organizer.
NEWS
August 16, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although they were rushing in where many warned that angels feared to tread, Deen and Jay Kogan were no fools. From the start, 50 years ago, they had their own ideas about what they wanted to do with theater in Philadelphia: Scripts that had never been performed here (or almost anywhere). Fully homegrown productions. European playwrights. And not just for audiences sitting in neat rows, but for, and among, the people: street theater all over Philly, youth theater, plays in senior-care homes, plays in the middle of institutions.
NEWS
January 14, 2009 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a lively bit of guerrilla theater that featured a pink-and-purple jester prosecuting a crowned and clueless "Emperor Nutter," demonstrators protested library closings at City Hall yesterday. Mayor Nutter and Free Library Director Siobhan Reardon were declared "in contempt of the people's court" by costumed members of the ad hoc Coalition to Save the Libraries. The two were accused of working to sabotage a judge's ruling to keep open 11 branches that had been scheduled to be shuttered.
NEWS
February 15, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
T. Milton Street Sr. took the witness stand in his own defense yesterday, telling a federal jury he paid his taxes until he became convinced the tax code is unconstitutional. He also unabashedly admitted that he had sought to take advantage of the fact that his brother was mayor to win the consulting contracts that earned him millions. "I was trying to function within the political environment, which is something that's been done in Philadelphia since the beginning of time," Street testified.
NEWS
September 20, 2006 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
All the world may be a stage, but theaters in general, and those on the Avenue of the Arts in particular, have a bad habit of hiding one of their most exciting dramas behind the solid walls of their buildings: the preshow arrival of their well-dressed patrons. The Philadelphia Theatre Company, which tonight plans to show off the first architectural renderings of its new Broad Street home, intends to greet the world with more flash. Its entire 70-foot-long facade will be a series of large shop windows that allow voyeuristic glimpses of the gathering crowd in the lobby, and should generate a buzz of excitement that has so far been missing from the Avenue of the Arts.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|