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August 31, 2012
Theater Cape May Stage: The 39 Steps Fast-paced stage adaptation of the Hitchcock mystery. Closes 9/7. Robert Shackleton Playhouse, Bank & Lafayette Sts., Cape May; Box Office: 609-884-1341. www.capemaystage.org . $35; $30 seniors; $15 students. Deathtrap Comic thriller about a playwright scheming to steal one of his students' works. Closes 9/23. Hedgerow Theatre, 64 Rose Valley Rd., Media; 610-565-4211. $25-32; $22-29 seniors; $10 students and children. East Lynne Theater Company: The Poe Mysteries World premiere theatrical adaptation of several of Edgar Allan Poe's mystery stories.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
What's that smell? It's The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (stoopid) Tales at Walnut Street Theatre through Sunday. The hour-long musical comedy is based on the immensely popular 1992 book by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith. Jack tries to save himself from being eaten by the Giant by regaling him with fairy tales, frequently fractured (Cinderumplestiltskin, anyone? Goldilocks and the Three Elephants?). Fairy-tale worlds converge and come to life as the audience goes on a journey into Jack's crazy world.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
HAD ENOUGH of deformed, subterranean opera-house denizens, barricade-building, 19th-century French student revolutionaries, musical adaptations of obscure movies and the endless parade of Disney characters come-to-life? Then head to the Walnut Street Theatre and bask in the glory of the way things used to be, when musicals sparkled with clever comedic banter, genuinely funny jokes and honest-to-goodness songs that stayed in your head long after the curtain fell, as opposed to dialogue delivered via instantly forgettable melodies wrapped in ersatz rock or watered-down R&B. Through July 13, the Walnut is presenting "How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying," one of the most popular musical comedies of all time.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
IT'S A good thing I thoroughly enjoyed "Elf," the musical-stage version of the hit 2003 movie that runs through Jan. 5 at the Walnut Street Theatre. If I hadn't, I'd likely have to surrender my membership in the human race. That's because only the Grinchiest of Scrooges (or is that Scroogiest of Grinches?) could give a "Bah, humbug!" to this merry melange of yuletide music and mirth. Like the film upon which it is based, "Elf" follows the misadventures of a bumbling but lovable North Pole denizen who, though raised from infanthood as one of Santa's elves, is actually a human being (hence his unusual height and inability to speedily and efficiently construct toys)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
David Lindsay-Abaire's Broadway hit play Good People , at Walnut Street Theatre, is about class. It is a sociological cliche that the American inclination is always to root for the underdog, which often means, as it does here, the unlucky, the uneducated, the unemployed. "Un" is the fact of life in "Southie," a thickly accented rough and tough neighborhood in Boston. The plot centers on Margaret (Julie Czarnecki) who, fired by her nice-guy boss (Jered McLenigan) from her job at the Dollar Store, faces eviction from her not-so-nice landlady (Sharon Alexander)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013
Theater A Flea in Her Ear Mayhem & madcap humor from master farceur Georges Feydeau. Closes 4/28. Hedgerow Theatre, 64 Rose Valley Rd., Media; 610-565-4211. $32; $29 seniors; $10 students. A Raisin in the Sun Lorraine Hansberry's drama, directed by Walter Dallas. Closes 4/21. Arden Theatre, 40 N. 2d St.; 215-922-1122. $36-$48; $15 students. B. Someday Productions: Criminal Genius A father/son crime team try to burn down a restaurant, but encounter problems. Closes 3/30.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Philadelphia's old Arch Street Theatre, he was a "great hit," the newspaper said. His energetic performances in plays such as Richard III and The Marble Heart drew large crowds. And his dashing good looks - some called him "the handsomest man in America" - made him an instant heartthrob, the matinee idol of his day. "The audience was very enthusiastic, the ladies joining in the applause," The Inquirer wrote of one appearance. Before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln, he was a well-known stage star warmly embraced by a city where he had strong ties to his famous thespian family.
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