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Streetlights

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NEWS
March 7, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Officials have decided to buy streetlights from Philadelphia Electric Co. in the hopes of saving money. At Wednesday night's meeting, Councilwoman Virginia Putnick read a proposal to buy streetlights and utility polls from PE. The borough will need to spend about $19,000 to buy the poles, brackets and luminaries, she said. Putnick said the money would be taken from a grant that was to pay for a study of recreational needs for the borough. It will be returned once the savings are realized.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The City Council is poised to buy the city's 3,537 streetlights from Peco Energy Co. at a cost that the city engineer estimates will be recovered by one year's savings on electric bills. At a council caucus meeting yesterday, City Engineer Charles Catania said the council could purchase the lights for $242,000. The savings on Chester's $850,000-a-year electric bill for streetlights would be about $300,000, Catania said. The city would have to spend about $50,000 annually for maintenance.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
The taxpayers of Upper Moreland Township are now pioneers as part-owners of a new municipal venture, according to township officials. They own the streetlights. Upper Moreland Township manager Brian Mook announced this week that the township purchased 1,128 streetlights from the Philadelphia Electric Co. Upper Moreland is the first area municipality within Philadelphia Electric Co.'s service area - which includes Montgomery, Bucks, Delaware and Chester Counties - to purchase the existing streetlighting system from PECO as a money-saving measure.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lower Merion is likely to become one of the growing number of area municipalities to buy its existing streetlights from Philadelphia Electric Co. in order to cut costs. Township officials are negotiating with PE to buy the 5,000 streetlights for an estimated $1.5 million. Bert Williams, the township's public works director, said that under the buy-out, Lower Merion would assume responsibility for maintaining the lights and in turn, get a lower rate from PE. In 1987, the township's electric bill is expected to be $1.2 million.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By JULIANA REYES
EVERY KID knows that he's not supposed to walk down a dark street. But that old rule is tough to follow if the dark street is your own block. Unfortunately, the residents of two Philly streets recently had to deal with this dilemma for nearly two months after their streetlights went out - and their calls for help went unheeded. As the days grow shorter, streetlights become more important. While there's no definitive evidence that lights deter crime, they promote the perception of safety, which can be just as important, says Deborah Schaaf, senior planner at the City Planning Commission.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Broad Street isn't Broadway, but it's poised to get something that its better-known northern neighbor has in luminescent abundance: Lights - a 2.5-mile stretch of them, set down the center of the street as a giant linear artwork. Executives at Avenue of the Arts Inc. have a plan - and the money - to start planting sleek, stainless-steel streetlights on North Broad. On Wednesday night, city officials, arts leaders, and project managers will gather for the formal unveiling and lighting of a prototype near the Temple University Law School.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer correspondent Mark Binker contributed to this article
Twenty-six municipalities in Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties are set to file a new challenge with Pennsylvania's Public Utility Commission, arguing that Peco Energy Co. charges excessive fees to power their streetlights. The action is expected in about two weeks, an attorney said last week. In dispute are monthly charges known as "location fees," which impose a $10.01 tariff on every point at which a streetlight connects to the Peco system. The fees can make up 60 to 90 percent of a municipality's monthly energy bill.
NEWS
March 7, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In defiance of the old saying about going home again, Mayor Nutter spent a couple of hours on Roxborough's main business corridor in his old City Council district yesterday. Just two days after his proposed 2-cents-per-ounce soft-drink tax and $300-a-year trash fee got angry reactions, the business owners and shoppers along Ridge Avenue greeted their former councilman with smiles, handshakes, and good wishes. Perhaps it was the sunshine on the springlike afternoon, but the mood was so light that the current Fourth District councilman, Curtis Jones Jr., joked that he didn't want Nutter to enjoy his visit so much that he would consider seeking his old job again.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
According to the Peco Energy Co., the corner of Street Road and Pine has been well lit for years. There is no Pine Street in Warminster. Or Pine Avenue. Or Pine Boulevard, for that matter. The township doesn't even have many pine trees. As Warminster was preparing to buy 500 streetlights it now rents from Peco, workers discovered the Bucks County township has been getting charged for at least two lights at locations that don't exist. Other lights on the bill actually belong to neighboring Warwick Township.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 20, 2013
EASTON, Pa. - A man who prosecutors say helped bilk Bethlehem Township out of more than $800,000 will serve 16 months to five years in prison. A Northampton County judge sentenced Robert Kearns, 49, on Friday to the same term a former business partner got last week for stealing more than $832,000 from the township in a streetlight deal gone wrong, the Easton Express-Times reported. - AP
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
SOON Philadelphians will be able to report problem potholes, trashy blocks and busted streetlights on their smartphones with the city's new free 3-1-1 mobile application. Managing Director Rich Negrin said Tuesday that the city's nonemergency call center, which handles a million calls a year, could roll out a mobile app as early as this summer. The announcement followed a question posed by City Councilman Bill Green during Tuesday's budget hearing. "We're absolutely going to have one," Negrin said.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Camden's struggle to keep its streets well-lit illuminates a long-standing disconnect between City Hall and the community. When a neighborhood, nonprofit, or resident city government doesn't control comes up with an idea - even a good one - the city's response is usually a defensive crouch. The default responses from that art deco tower of granite at Sixth and Market are, "We can't do that, we don't have the money," or, "We're already working on that. We just have to find a way to pay for it. " Thus, the city appears to be responsive, can place blame elsewhere (Trenton, Washington, etc.)
NEWS
November 27, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Instead of the Grinch, it could be scrap-metal bandits who steal Christmas this year from some Camden residents. The big snowflakes that have decorated the Broadway and Ferry Avenue area in the Waterfront South section of Camden in recent years can't be hung because of damaged light posts. "We have our troubles," said Ferry Avenue resident Cassie MacDonald, "but we enjoy beauty as much as everyone else. " Hundreds of streetlights are out throughout Camden, a nine-square-mile city often ranked among the most dangerous in the country.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By JULIANA REYES
EVERY KID knows that he's not supposed to walk down a dark street. But that old rule is tough to follow if the dark street is your own block. Unfortunately, the residents of two Philly streets recently had to deal with this dilemma for nearly two months after their streetlights went out - and their calls for help went unheeded. As the days grow shorter, streetlights become more important. While there's no definitive evidence that lights deter crime, they promote the perception of safety, which can be just as important, says Deborah Schaaf, senior planner at the City Planning Commission.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Broad Street isn't Broadway, but it's poised to get something that its better-known northern neighbor has in luminescent abundance: Lights - a 2.5-mile stretch of them, set down the center of the street as a giant linear artwork. Executives at Avenue of the Arts Inc. have a plan - and the money - to start planting sleek, stainless-steel streetlights on North Broad. On Wednesday night, city officials, arts leaders, and project managers will gather for the formal unveiling and lighting of a prototype near the Temple University Law School.
NEWS
March 7, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In defiance of the old saying about going home again, Mayor Nutter spent a couple of hours on Roxborough's main business corridor in his old City Council district yesterday. Just two days after his proposed 2-cents-per-ounce soft-drink tax and $300-a-year trash fee got angry reactions, the business owners and shoppers along Ridge Avenue greeted their former councilman with smiles, handshakes, and good wishes. Perhaps it was the sunshine on the springlike afternoon, but the mood was so light that the current Fourth District councilman, Curtis Jones Jr., joked that he didn't want Nutter to enjoy his visit so much that he would consider seeking his old job again.
NEWS
October 12, 2009 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The glow of streetlights in Cherry Hill will soon shift from soft amber to bright white, a change in the nighttime aesthetic that engineers say will be accompanied by a significant decline in township electricity use. "About 80 percent of the towns in our coverage area use the old mercury-vapor lights," said Benjamin White, a project manager with PSE&G, New Jersey's largest utility provider with 2.1 million electric customers. Cherry Hill, where nearly all the streetlights were mercury vapor, already has begun installing 4,280 energy-efficient induction-fluorescent models.
NEWS
March 10, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four Bucks County municipalities yesterday were among the first in the state to receive money from a new initiative aimed at enhancing community life. Grants totaling $2.3 million were awarded to Doylestown Borough and Township, Quakertown and Yardley. The communities were among 141 to receive nearly $130 million from the state Department of Transportation, mostly for street, sidewalk and lighting improvements. "These programs will help fund a town-building effort that is imperative to the Rendell administration," said Charles Metzger, PennDot spokesman.
NEWS
April 18, 2004 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If you want to know the number of streetlights in Camden, ask Josh Rivera. Rivera, 16, a sophomore at Woodrow Wilson High School, along with five other members of a Camden streetlight survey team, counted them all. "Actually, we counted them twice, once to find out where they were, and the second time to see if they were working," Rivera said. The five are learning computer skills through Hopeworks 'N Camden, a program run by the Rev. Jeff Putthoff, a Jesuit priest assigned to Holy Name Roman Catholic Church in Camden.
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