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Strength Training

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2011
I'VE BEEN in the fitness game for more than 20 years, and the myths that never seem to die are the ones concerning women and weight training. Today, I hope to dispel some of these and nudge a few more women to get serious about toning and strength-training. MYTH 1: Strength training makes women larger and heavier. This most persistently persistent myth couldn't be further from the truth. The only thing bulking us up are those biscuits, breads and bagels. To the contrary, lifting heavy weights is one of the best ways to increase strength while simultaneously improving muscle tone.
SPORTS
January 6, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Anyone who has run for some time has had the importance of strength training drilled into his or her head: If you don't hit the gym a few times a week, you're more prone to injury, which could lead to a layoff, which means no more running. But when I'm putting in 30, 40, 50 miles a week, the last thing I want to do is squats on legs that already feel like overcooked spaghetti. What I really want are some nachos and a hot shower. Jeff Horowitz has a solution. He's been a running coach for more than a decade and is the author of Quick Strength for Runners.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
If you belong to a fitness or health club, you may notice members studying slips of paper - their training schedules - near the free weights or Nautilus machines. By following carefully planned routines, these people work out to increase their strength through training. If you become involved in a strength-training program, you may want to remember a few words: Repetitions, or "reps": the number of times a particular exercise is performed without resting during a set. Set: a specific number of repetitions performed consecutively without resting.
SPORTS
June 6, 2001 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allen Iverson notwithstanding, size matters in the NBA. Basketball players have always been big, but these days they are not only tall but broad, not only heavy but built. In the lingo of the weight room, they are "huge" - armor-plated with thick slabs of muscle, as defined and "cut" as any bodybuilder. Compared to most normal mortals, they are still giraffes, but increasingly they look like giraffes on steroids - giraffes who can bench-press twice their weight and have the bulk to both dish it out and take it under the boards.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | By Marc Levy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Harriet Berkey can now lift a half-gallon jug of milk. She also can stand on the tips of her toes and reach for items without losing her balance. As mundane as both activities might seem, Berkey, 56, of Evesham, has spent 1 1/2 years attending strength classes at the Mount Laurel branch of the Family Y of Burlington County to help her maintain her strength and keep her balance while fighting the effects of multiple sclerosis. "When I left work, I knew that I'd have to do something to keep myself moving because if you don't use it, you lose it," said Berkey, a former nurse anesthetist who was diagnosed with the disease about two years ago after she began having trouble maintaining her balance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
JOINT HEALTH, not a sexy topic, is often neglected in our discussions about health and fitness, But make no mistake about it: Ignore your joints and they will cause you grief. Many, if not most, people (me included) are initially motivated to exercise purely out of vanity - the search for that elusive, so-called perfect physique. Thing is, it's all an illusion. Whether you are Rubenesque, slender, or somewhere in between, your primary focus should not be about conforming to fashion or someone else's ideals of beauty.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014
NO DOUBT you have already heard that first lady Michelle Obama turned 50 last month - but did you hear that she was going to change her workout and do less weight training and cardio and do more yoga? "I'm seeing myself shift from weight-bearing stuff . . . and the heavy cardio and running, to things like yoga that will keep me flexible," she told People magazine in an interview last month. Hold up, Mrs. Obama: While yoga offers a variety of complements, including improving flexibility, yoga should not be seen as a replacement for strength training.
NEWS
January 17, 1988 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
With the proper training you can feel as strong as a bull moose, just as Teddy Roosevelt did. But there's no reason to be bullheaded about it. Even athletes who already can outrun, outjump or outclass their opponents yearn for muscles that are bigger, stronger and more enduring. Their desire is admirable, but the manner in which some of them go about getting this power is misguided and, in some cases, dangerous. If you're power-hungry in this way, begin with the idea that no single strength-training routine will magically enhance your performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014
FINALLY, spring has sprung and many people, especially women, are revved up, and have put their running routine in heavy rotation. After all, running is good for you, right? Everybody knows that running keeps you fit as a fiddle, and may reduce risks of heart disease, diabetes and obesity, too. Yes, it's well documented that high-impact exercise, such as running, is good for your heart. And yes, it is also true that nearly every woman is convinced that running is the best way to stay slim and toned.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 26, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Sam Bradford finally enjoyed a healthy summer. He was not sequestered in a training room rehabilitating a torn knee, like he did the previous two summers. An elusive break in his schedule allowed Bradford to spend time with teammates, focus on building the rest of his body - and even get married. Bradford begins his second training camp with the Eagles on Monday as the unequivocal starting quarterback, but with his career in Philadelphia likely expiring after this season. Yet all the attention devoted to Bradford's employment has overshadowed what's otherwise been the dominant story line of Bradford's career: His health.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
JOINT HEALTH, not a sexy topic, is often neglected in our discussions about health and fitness, But make no mistake about it: Ignore your joints and they will cause you grief. Many, if not most, people (me included) are initially motivated to exercise purely out of vanity - the search for that elusive, so-called perfect physique. Thing is, it's all an illusion. Whether you are Rubenesque, slender, or somewhere in between, your primary focus should not be about conforming to fashion or someone else's ideals of beauty.
SPORTS
October 4, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY, N.J. - The hip-hop music was cut off on Friday afternoon as another session of Sixers training camp wound down. And then the Stockton University basketball gym filled with the sounds of chirping birds and soothing music. In a new training camp ritual, it was time to meditate. The Sixers players laid on their backs in a row and propped their feet onto a chair. An onlooker in the crowd asked if the team was really meditating. The players crossed their hands on their chests and closed their eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014
A NEW STUDY has delivered compelling evidence that diet, exercise and other prescription-free interventions are the best way to ward off Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's is perhaps the most dreadful of modern diseases: It steals your mind, your personality and your very soul. And once you have it, there is no turning back. On a personal note, I have seen firsthand the slow, devastating effects of this awful disease on a loved one, as well as the family members. So, my ears really perked up when I heard about the groundbreaking study that was presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2014
FOR YEARS, I have encouraged ordinary women to embrace weight training and its many benefits. Yet, most women still tend to avoid weight-bearing exercises, fearing that their muscles will expand to Amazonian proportions. Nothing could be further from the truth. But there are many misconceptions about women's bodybuilding, a subject recently explored on HBO's show "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel. " This segment pulled back the curtain for a rare, in-depth glimpse into the shocking and secretive world of professional women's bodybuilding.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014
FINALLY, spring has sprung and many people, especially women, are revved up, and have put their running routine in heavy rotation. After all, running is good for you, right? Everybody knows that running keeps you fit as a fiddle, and may reduce risks of heart disease, diabetes and obesity, too. Yes, it's well documented that high-impact exercise, such as running, is good for your heart. And yes, it is also true that nearly every woman is convinced that running is the best way to stay slim and toned.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014
NO DOUBT you have already heard that first lady Michelle Obama turned 50 last month - but did you hear that she was going to change her workout and do less weight training and cardio and do more yoga? "I'm seeing myself shift from weight-bearing stuff . . . and the heavy cardio and running, to things like yoga that will keep me flexible," she told People magazine in an interview last month. Hold up, Mrs. Obama: While yoga offers a variety of complements, including improving flexibility, yoga should not be seen as a replacement for strength training.
SPORTS
January 6, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Anyone who has run for some time has had the importance of strength training drilled into his or her head: If you don't hit the gym a few times a week, you're more prone to injury, which could lead to a layoff, which means no more running. But when I'm putting in 30, 40, 50 miles a week, the last thing I want to do is squats on legs that already feel like overcooked spaghetti. What I really want are some nachos and a hot shower. Jeff Horowitz has a solution. He's been a running coach for more than a decade and is the author of Quick Strength for Runners.
SPORTS
September 29, 2013 | BY COLIN WASHINGTON, For the Daily News
PHILADELPHIA'S most prominent boxers fared well this summer, ousting whoever stepped into the ring against them. Kensington's Danny Garcia (27-0) defeated Lucas Matthysse on the Mayweather-Canelo undercard. North Philadelphia's Bryant Jennings (17-0) managed a stellar knockout over Andrey Fedosov back in late May Middleweight Gabriel Rosado lost a split decision to J'Leon Love in May that was overturned when Love failed a drug test. But with all that, it's likely that Jesse Hart put together the busiest and most prolific summer.
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