CollectionsStrep Throat
IN THE NEWS

Strep Throat

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | By Cathleen Egan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a year when taxpayers here have faced substantial increases in municipal and school taxes, the school board has found a way to cough up some savings: The school district is getting out of the strep throat-testing business. Beginning this fall, the district's six school nurses will no longer give the strep test to those among the 3,300-plus students who complain of sore throats. The students will simply be sent to their own physicians. And the projected cost savings? Approximately $3,000, with $1,000 of that coming from test supplies such as swabs, said school district spokeswoman Geri Borbe.
SPORTS
September 16, 1993 | By Nick Fierro, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One simple reason explains why Shawn McElhaugh insisted on running for the Council Rock cross-country team last year while suffering from strep throat. The same goes for why he didn't mind being in the center of the publicity generated by a nationally ranked powerhouse that won back-to-back state championships. "Running is my life," said the emerging senior. "It was kind of difficult because it (strep throat) kept going away and kept coming back, I probably just kept running myself into a wall by going out there.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The doctor doesn't think your sore throat is bad enough yet to order a strep test - unaware that a dozen people across town were diagnosed with strep throat just last week. Doctors rarely know what bugs are brewing in the neighborhood until their own waiting rooms start to fill. Harvard University researchers reported Monday that getting them real-time information on nearby infections could improve patient care - for strep throat alone, potentially helping tens of thousands avoid a delayed diagnosis or getting unneeded antibiotics.
NEWS
January 26, 1996 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Two recent deaths in South Jersey may be part of what federal officials fear is an increase in cases involving the dreaded flesh-eating bacteria. Nevertheless, health officials insist there is no reason for public alarm over the deaths of Edward Michael Layton, 56, Tuesday in West Jersey Health Systems' Marlton division and an unidentifed 70-year-old woman last week in West Jersey's Vorhees hospital. Both deaths were linked to the bacteria, which has been under investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
SUN AND OILY SKIN. The summer sun may help dry up oily skin, but oily skin is no protection against the summer sun. In fact, people with oily skin should be especially careful because perspiration and some sunscreen ingredients can aggravate acne problems, says Young C. Kauh, clinical professor of dermatology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. COLON-CANCER DRUG. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is allowing a new drug aimed at colon cancer to be used for the gravely ill without waiting for study results, because the drug appears to be so promising.
NEWS
March 6, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Wilmington area man has died. A Montgomery County man is recovering. Both developed the infection known in medical books as necrotizing fasciitis and in headlines as "flesh-eating bacteria. " The coincidental appearance of two unrelated cases in a large metropolitan area is neither surprising nor necessarily alarming, experts say. Six months ago, two simultaneous cases in Philadelphia and Bucks County made news. Fortunately, experts say, the disease is rare. Most people have natural resistance to the germs that cause the necrotizing fasciitis.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 17-year-old Philadelphia boy was fighting for his life this morning at Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland, Delaware County, with a case of necrotizing fasciitis, or flesh-eating bacteria. Nursing supervisor Kathy Denny said the boy was in serious condition. At the request of the youth's family, she declined to release any further information. Hospital sources confirmed the boy's identity as James Brown of Germantown. The sources said that the infection was "devastating" to the boy and that they feared for his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Excuse me, but there is a bug on your face. Actually, there are a million of them. Not to worry. They are perfectly harmless. They are merely part of the body's normal population which includes a vast and varied array of bacteria, fungi (aaargh, there's a fungus among us) and other tiny creatures which, although truly disgusting to view in a microscope, are actually vital to our well-being. So reports Robert Ebisch, Science columnist for Ambassador Magazine. He says that a wormlike creature called Demodex folliculorum lives in the roots of our eyelashes and eats mascara if given the chance.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | By Joe Santoliquito, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
It's been one health problem after another for Cardinal O'Hara's John Watson. Earlier this season, Watson had strep throat. During yesterday's Catholic League Southern Division game against Monsignor Bonner, Watson once again looked flushed. He resorted to loosening exercises midway through the first quarter in an effort to get himself jump-started. But, apparently, Watson plays better ill than others do healthy. The senior point guard, despite having the sniffles and trouble breathing, scored 17 points and showed considerable composure in leading O'Hara, in easy fashion, yesterday to its 18th straight victory, 62-45, over Bonner.
SPORTS
February 15, 2001 | by Mike Kern , Daily News Sports Writer
Just when you figured things couldn't get any worse for Temple's basketball team. . . The Owls found out they will be without starting center Ron Rollerson for three to five weeks. The 6-10 junior suffered a severe foot sprain early in the second half of Tuesday's 71-62 loss at St. Joseph's. That leaves John Chaney with eight players, two of whom, Rouldra Thomas and Mamadou Cellou Barry, rarely play. Thomas missed the St. Joe's game with strep throat. His status for Saturday's trip to Massachusetts remains uncertain.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Dr. Charitha Gowda, For The Inquirer
She closed her calculus textbook and put it aside. The text and equations on the page had started to blur together, and all she could focus on was how her throat was on fire. She took a few small sips from the bottle of orange juice that had been her constant companion for the last week. "It can't be the flu," she thought, since she didn't have a headache, runny nose, cough, or muscle aches. Having had strep throat many times as a child, she had initially thought this episode was no different.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigations into the cause of bacterial infections that killed one woman and hospitalized two others after liposuction procedures in Maryland have spilled into Pennsylvania and Delaware, with authorities Friday advising customers of Monarch Med Spas that they might have been exposed. Maryland health officials shut down the cosmetic-surgery center in Timonium, north of Baltimore, on Wednesday after an inspection raised concerns about infection-control procedures. Monarch's other four centers are in Philadelphia, King of Prussia, Harrisburg, and Greenville, Del. The Pennsylvania and Delaware health departments urged people who underwent procedures and have fever, infection, or prolonged redness of the wound site to contact their health providers.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigations into the cause of bacterial infections that killed one woman and hospitalized two others after liposuction procedures in Maryland have spilled into Pennsylvania and Delaware, with authorities Friday advising customers of Monarch Med Spas that they might have been exposed. Maryland health officials shut down the cosmetic-surgery center in Timonium, north of Baltimore, on Wednesday after an inspection raised concerns about infection-control procedures. Monarch's other four centers are in Philadelphia, King of Prussia, Harrisburg, and Greenville, Del. The Pennsylvania and Delaware health departments urged people who underwent procedures and have fever, infection, or prolonged redness of the wound site to contact their health providers.
SPORTS
April 27, 2012 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer
THE MOMENT was mostly about Sheila Reid, for all the obvious story lines. Still, it's called a relay for a reason. You usually need all four legs of the race to make it happen. Heading into Thursday's Distance Medley Championship of America at Franklin Field, everyone knew that Villanova had the best anchor, even if the fifth-year senior star had never won at the Penn Relays. But it turns out the Wildcats also sent out a threesome ahead of her who took care of their business about as well as coach Gina Procaccio could have possibly game-planned.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The doctor doesn't think your sore throat is bad enough yet to order a strep test - unaware that a dozen people across town were diagnosed with strep throat just last week. Doctors rarely know what bugs are brewing in the neighborhood until their own waiting rooms start to fill. Harvard University researchers reported Monday that getting them real-time information on nearby infections could improve patient care - for strep throat alone, potentially helping tens of thousands avoid a delayed diagnosis or getting unneeded antibiotics.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (3 p.m., NBC10) - Bradley Cooper; Donny and Marie Osmond perform. The Oprah Winfrey Show (4 p.m., 6ABC) - James Frey. NCIS (8 p.m., CBS3) - Gibbs and the team finally come face to face with the infamous Port-to-Port killer. The Biggest Loser (8 p.m., NBC10) - The final four contestants carry golf bags weighing the amount they've lost. Glee (8 p.m., Fox29) - Someone at McKinley deals with the unexpected loss of a loved one. NCIS: Los Angeles (9 p.m., CBS3)
SPORTS
February 25, 2011 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
There are better words to hear when you're looking forward to helping your team in an important basketball game. "You look like you're dead. You can't play today. " Omar Askia was inclined to protest that pronouncement from Dave Huzzard, the first-year coach at Frankford High. But he had just arrived a shade late for classes after making an early visit with his mom to Children's Hospital, and he had missed school on Wednesday. "They said I had strep throat," Askia said.
NEWS
December 31, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is meaning in the unfinished life, says music school director Nelly Berman. She and her young pupils are about to demonstrate how. On Jan. 29, with violins tucked under chins, hands poised over piano keys, and bows dancing across cello strings, boys and girls will take the stage in a special recital at the Haverford School on the Main Line. But after a few minutes, each performer will walk away, leaving his or her piece unfinished. The unusual performance is meant to represent the life of Chanlan Lee, a gifted young violin student who died in 2008 from viral encephalitis when he was 8. "This is to show our support for Chanlan, who was just beginning and did not finish his life," Berman said.
NEWS
December 19, 2010 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
I'm not going to shrink my hips or grow five inches in 2011. I didn't in 2010, 2009, or 2008, despite my penchant for making New Year's resolutions that defy common sense and human physiology. The only thing more depressing than a personal pledge unmet is one so unrealistic it couldn't be kept even if plastic surgery was free. That's why this year, I'm following Chaz Howard's lead to turn New Year's resolutions inside out. "What if," he asks, "we made resolutions that were about serving and caring for others?"
SPORTS
March 6, 2010 | By Pat Leonard FOR THE INQUIRER
Abington center Emily Leer showed her future Villanova coaches last night that she is more than comfortable playing at the Pavilion. Leer finished with 20 points, 10 rebounds, and 5 assists as the sixth-seeded Ghosts upset top seed Cheltenham, 54-44, for the District 1 Class AAAA girls' basketball championship. It is Abington's first district title since 1975. "It was a tough game, but I'm 1 and 0 on my [future] court," Leer said as she wore her championship medal around her neck.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|