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Stress

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Forrest Wickman, SLATE
At the beginning of Barack Obama's second term, magazines and newspapers are looking back at how he's aged over the first four years. One time-lapse video, according to Gawker, shows the president "Age 10 Years in 5 Years in 2 Minutes. " The Washington Post had photos of Obama "Then & Now," with former White House physician Connie Mariano describing presidents as looking like they "fast-forwarded eight years in the span of four years," presumably because of the stress of the job. Can chronic stress really cause early wrinkles and gray hair?
NEWS
April 16, 1986 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the 250 people displaced by the MOVE fire, as well as many of those living near the 6200 blocks of Osage Avenue and Pine Street, have been adapting to the enormous stress they have been living with since before the May 13 confrontation, mental health officials said yesterday. But the stress is so great that the threat of serious psychological problems is always there, particularly for some of the groups said to be "at risk" - children, the elderly, people already in therapy and others who suffer a major personal or job loss.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | by Peter H. Gott, M.D., Special to the Daily News
Q: My father complains of a stomach pain he thinks might be an ulcer. Since he leads a stress-free life and we have always been told ulcers are related to stress, we question this diagnosis. Can an ulcer be treated by our family doctor, or should he see a specialist? A: Although the classic teaching has been that stress causes ulcers, this dogma is not necessarily true. People with stress often have cast-iron stomachs, and patients without stress frequently develop peptic ulcers.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The holidays are stressful enough just coping with seasonal chores. A few tips can help turn that holiday frown into a smile. Don't wait until the last minute to put that toy or bicycle together for your child. Chances are you'll be too busy and too tired to do a good job. Don't serve red wine at your party if you have a light-colored carpet. Cleaning a spill can be extremely difficult or impossible. Keep a few wrapped "generic" gifts on hand for surprise guests who bring a gift.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | by Jean McGillicuddy, For the Daily News
Stress is a natural part of life that gives many of us a certain edge. But when it morphs into "distress" that's when you'll find yourself walloped by sciatica, sleepless nights and indigestion. Besides, it's hard to stay centered when you can't stop weeping in the Wheaties every morning. There are ways to monitor your stress level, and keep it lowered. Maintain a sense of humor. Life only comes around once and you might as well have a few yucks and giggles as you power-drive one kid to basketball and another to Girl Scouts, as everyone eats dinner in the car. Walk out the door.
NEWS
June 26, 2005 | By Justin Goldman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last summer the Gloucester County Cultural and Heritage Commission held an Italian festival at Gloucester County College to promote the importance of learning other cultures. This year, the commission is focusing on learning again, but this time its programs shift the emphasis to theater and art. From July 5 through Aug. 6, there will be a workshop called Learning Stages for children 8 to 14 that deals with musical theater. It is designed to give children confidence and experience on stage.
NEWS
August 15, 2010
Kevin Horrigan is a columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Welcome to Your Insurance Company's 24-hour-a-day Wellness Website, designed to let YOU take control of your health-care needs through a morale-boosting program of education, counseling, and aw-shucks neighborliness. Plus, if you're really, really lucky and persistent, you can save some money, though you shouldn't count on it, because every dollar you or your company saves is a dollar we don't get. And we're not in the health-insurance racket for our health.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Think of a rubber band. It can stretch and stretch - but then you s-t-r-e-t-c-h it too far and it breaks. The body's bones work the same way. When they are called on to endure too much stress, they crack. "Stress fractures," the medical term for such injuries, are faced by runners and other athletes. "We've seen a rash of stress fractures in the tibia (shin bone) and the pelvis in the past few weeks," said Dr. Phillip Marone, M.D., director of the Thomas Jefferson University Sports Medicine Center, 9th and Sansom streets, which opened four months ago. In recent days, Marone has treated shin stress fractures in a 15-year-old soccer player and in two recreational runners, ages 21 and 26. A 40-year-old attorney, also a runner, came in with a stress fracture of his pelvis.
NEWS
January 5, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Scripture-based discussions on how to handle stress while coping with the challenges inherent in contemporary life will be the focus of a series of four workshops set to begin Sunday at the Church of the Brethren, 351 E. Butler Ave., Ambler. The 9:30 a.m. workshops, "Faith Resources to Cope With Stress," are being sponsored by the church's ministry of adult elective classes, and will be led by Peter Bridge and the Rev. Kenn Haring of Samaritan Counseling Center in Ambler. "Stress and Our Inner Selves," Sunday's inaugural workshop, will center on Mark 6:31, and touch on the use of self-discovery and self-awareness to identify individual sources of stress.
NEWS
May 2, 1988 | By Bob Wiemer
Discovering stress on the job is about as much of a revelation as finding toes on feet, but recently there was an hour-long television special on the subject and one of the major weekly news magazines published a cover story that estimated the economic impact of job-related stress at $150 billion a year. The seemingly sudden increase in interest in the subject is not a matter of accident or coincidence. It's a matter of simple demographics: The baby boomers are moving into their middle age, and when a population cohort of that size does anything, it attracts attention.
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NEWS
May 22, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I recently received a very competitive internship in New York. I'm excited and can't wait to go. I have never been to New York, and my mom is driving me crazy over it. She's using my internship as an excuse to go on vacation to "see me," even though I have told her multiple times that I won't be able to do anything with her because I'll be working full time. She doesn't have a car and expects to use mine, and she's constantly sending me information about stuff we can do in New York.
SPORTS
March 25, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
BOCA RATON, Fla. - Doug Pederson wasn't around the Eagles last season, but when the new coach was asked Wednesday about next month's NFL draft, the first position he mentioned was one many fans would target. "I think you still have to address offensive line. You can never have enough o-linemen," Pederson said at the NFC coaches' breakfast, on the final day of the NFL meetings. He went on to also mention safety and pass rush help. What sort of o-linemen does Pederson have in mind?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have been in a relationship with my girlfriend, "Allison," for two years, but lately there have been frequent rough patches. I'm 18 and a college student. I love Allison, but the relationship is taking a toll on us physically and emotionally. We have had to deal with separation ever since we got together. She's the only one with a car and a "real" job. I work on campus in a work-study program in exchange for reduced tuition. I try to help Allison as much as I can to reduce the stress on her. She has asked me to transfer schools, but I'd like to stay where I am because I feel I will have the ability to make something of myself.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a side benefit to being a Rhodes Scholar that has Penn senior Jenna Hebert excited - she gets to keep rowing. She'll study at Oxford University next year, a place where even the various houses of the college put together boats to compete with each other. The big sporting competition of the year is a boat race with Cambridge University, simply called The Boat Race. Hebert would love to be a part of it. She'd be eligible as a graduate student if she can make a boat. "It seems like everyone at Oxford rows," Hebert said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: I have two children, ages 3 and 6. Last year, my 3-year-old was diagnosed with a rare disease, one that we are incredibly fortunate has a cure, but with considerable treatment. For most of this time, my 6-year-old lived with my sister and her family. This allowed my husband and me to focus on treatment. Now that both my children are at home, I noticed the attitude and behavior of my 6-year-old is very different; clearly, my sister runs her household much more relaxed than I do, with more processed foods, no set mealtimes, and lax bedtimes.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
T he other day at the Metropolitan Opera, Philadelphia tenor Stephen Costello was about to sing his second-act aria in a Rigoletto rehearsal when Plácido Domingo walked in, just to watch. "Which wasn't intimidating at all," Costello said with molto irony. But the elder tenor-turned-baritone later ran into Costello in the Met cafeteria - a little hard to imagine - praised him to the skies, suggested he investigate a certain kind of phrasing favored by Enrico Caruso. "He's like this grandfather . . . he just makes you feel so good," Costello said.
SPORTS
October 28, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Klentak had no trouble dispelling the notion that the Phillies hired solely an "analytics guy" as their new general manager. In his first day with his new organization, Klentak stressed balance as crucial to the team's ongoing rebuilding process. "Teams that lean too far in one direction, whether it's analytics or scouting or free agency or whatever it may be, those are teams that tend to get in trouble," he said. "I want to make sure that we are looking at all avenues, all pieces of information, and [we]
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Months without financial aid from Harrisburg - and no sign the spigot will flow again soon - is starting to wear on officials and agencies across the region. Through this month, Delaware, Chester, Montgomery, and Bucks Counties have shelled out more than $70 million from reserves to keep critical social service providers afloat. But officials from each aren't sure how long they can last and are watching their coffers week by week. "The budget is becoming stressed," said Jonathan Rubin, director of human services for Bucks County, which has spent between $6 million and $7 million monthly to fund social service programs usually paid for by the state.
SPORTS
October 7, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
IT WAS JUST a throwaway line by 76ers coach Brett Brown, but it spoke volumes of his tenure here: "We have the unfortunate experience of being quite practiced on how to deal with injuries. " It might be what the organization has done best, simply because it's what it has done most. And now the Sixers are at it again. Brown revealed after yesterday's practice that shooting guard Nik Stauskas will be out for a couple of weeks with a stress reaction in his right tibia. The injury didn't occur at any specific time, according to the team; rather, it started with soreness during Thursday's practice at Stockton University.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Lincoln High never had trouble finding subs. Even though it is a large, comprehensive high school, temporary teachers wanted to work there. That changed last week, when a private firm took over managing the Philadelphia School District's substitute services. Source4Teachers, based in Cherry Hill, received a $34 million contract and promised it would fill 75 percent of vacancies initially, ramping up to 90 percent by January. But Source4Teachers achieved its highest "fill rate" of the week on Friday, when just 12 percent of the 456 city classrooms that needed substitute services had them.
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