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Stress

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Forrest Wickman, SLATE
At the beginning of Barack Obama's second term, magazines and newspapers are looking back at how he's aged over the first four years. One time-lapse video, according to Gawker, shows the president "Age 10 Years in 5 Years in 2 Minutes. " The Washington Post had photos of Obama "Then & Now," with former White House physician Connie Mariano describing presidents as looking like they "fast-forwarded eight years in the span of four years," presumably because of the stress of the job. Can chronic stress really cause early wrinkles and gray hair?
NEWS
April 16, 1986 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the 250 people displaced by the MOVE fire, as well as many of those living near the 6200 blocks of Osage Avenue and Pine Street, have been adapting to the enormous stress they have been living with since before the May 13 confrontation, mental health officials said yesterday. But the stress is so great that the threat of serious psychological problems is always there, particularly for some of the groups said to be "at risk" - children, the elderly, people already in therapy and others who suffer a major personal or job loss.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | by Peter H. Gott, M.D., Special to the Daily News
Q: My father complains of a stomach pain he thinks might be an ulcer. Since he leads a stress-free life and we have always been told ulcers are related to stress, we question this diagnosis. Can an ulcer be treated by our family doctor, or should he see a specialist? A: Although the classic teaching has been that stress causes ulcers, this dogma is not necessarily true. People with stress often have cast-iron stomachs, and patients without stress frequently develop peptic ulcers.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The holidays are stressful enough just coping with seasonal chores. A few tips can help turn that holiday frown into a smile. Don't wait until the last minute to put that toy or bicycle together for your child. Chances are you'll be too busy and too tired to do a good job. Don't serve red wine at your party if you have a light-colored carpet. Cleaning a spill can be extremely difficult or impossible. Keep a few wrapped "generic" gifts on hand for surprise guests who bring a gift.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | by Jean McGillicuddy, For the Daily News
Stress is a natural part of life that gives many of us a certain edge. But when it morphs into "distress" that's when you'll find yourself walloped by sciatica, sleepless nights and indigestion. Besides, it's hard to stay centered when you can't stop weeping in the Wheaties every morning. There are ways to monitor your stress level, and keep it lowered. Maintain a sense of humor. Life only comes around once and you might as well have a few yucks and giggles as you power-drive one kid to basketball and another to Girl Scouts, as everyone eats dinner in the car. Walk out the door.
NEWS
June 26, 2005 | By Justin Goldman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last summer the Gloucester County Cultural and Heritage Commission held an Italian festival at Gloucester County College to promote the importance of learning other cultures. This year, the commission is focusing on learning again, but this time its programs shift the emphasis to theater and art. From July 5 through Aug. 6, there will be a workshop called Learning Stages for children 8 to 14 that deals with musical theater. It is designed to give children confidence and experience on stage.
NEWS
August 15, 2010
Kevin Horrigan is a columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Welcome to Your Insurance Company's 24-hour-a-day Wellness Website, designed to let YOU take control of your health-care needs through a morale-boosting program of education, counseling, and aw-shucks neighborliness. Plus, if you're really, really lucky and persistent, you can save some money, though you shouldn't count on it, because every dollar you or your company saves is a dollar we don't get. And we're not in the health-insurance racket for our health.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Think of a rubber band. It can stretch and stretch - but then you s-t-r-e-t-c-h it too far and it breaks. The body's bones work the same way. When they are called on to endure too much stress, they crack. "Stress fractures," the medical term for such injuries, are faced by runners and other athletes. "We've seen a rash of stress fractures in the tibia (shin bone) and the pelvis in the past few weeks," said Dr. Phillip Marone, M.D., director of the Thomas Jefferson University Sports Medicine Center, 9th and Sansom streets, which opened four months ago. In recent days, Marone has treated shin stress fractures in a 15-year-old soccer player and in two recreational runners, ages 21 and 26. A 40-year-old attorney, also a runner, came in with a stress fracture of his pelvis.
NEWS
January 5, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Scripture-based discussions on how to handle stress while coping with the challenges inherent in contemporary life will be the focus of a series of four workshops set to begin Sunday at the Church of the Brethren, 351 E. Butler Ave., Ambler. The 9:30 a.m. workshops, "Faith Resources to Cope With Stress," are being sponsored by the church's ministry of adult elective classes, and will be led by Peter Bridge and the Rev. Kenn Haring of Samaritan Counseling Center in Ambler. "Stress and Our Inner Selves," Sunday's inaugural workshop, will center on Mark 6:31, and touch on the use of self-discovery and self-awareness to identify individual sources of stress.
NEWS
May 2, 1988 | By Bob Wiemer
Discovering stress on the job is about as much of a revelation as finding toes on feet, but recently there was an hour-long television special on the subject and one of the major weekly news magazines published a cover story that estimated the economic impact of job-related stress at $150 billion a year. The seemingly sudden increase in interest in the subject is not a matter of accident or coincidence. It's a matter of simple demographics: The baby boomers are moving into their middle age, and when a population cohort of that size does anything, it attracts attention.
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BUSINESS
April 30, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
What keeps fund-raisers up at night? Having to raise funds. They worry about having the time to pursue the big donors while small tasks clog schedules. They worry about their jobs - their performance, or lack of it, is painfully obvious. And they worry about having to come up with new and novel ways to raise money. All this according to a recent "Demon Exchange Survey" by the Association of Fundraising Professionals - Greater Philadelphia Chapter. "It's a much higher-profile profession than it used to be," said Stan H. Retif, a fund-raiser and president of the 550-member Philadelphia chapter.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
THERE was an eerie familiarity to the headlines when a soldier on Fort Hood Army base reportedly went on a rampage last week, killing or wounding 19 people before turning the gun on himself. In the immediate aftermath of such tragedies, we often find ourselves with more questions than answers. But with the facts now available, a narrative all too common among our nation's servicemen and women is quickly beginning to take shape. During a news conference after the shooting, Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, the commanding officer at the military installation, told reporters that the alleged gunman, identified as Spec.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014
THE POSITIVE effects of working out extend far beyond the gym. As you might have guessed, physicians, researchers and mental-health practitioners have long discovered the positive relationship between exercise and mental health. More than a decade ago, researchers at Duke University released a groundbreaking study demonstrating that 30 minutes of brisk exercise three times a week is just as effective as drug therapy in relieving the symptoms of major depression in the short term, and also that continued exercise reduces the chances of the depression returning.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Across a brightly lit room, three dozen immigrants sit shoulder-to-shoulder on three pew-like benches. Many look scared. Some murmur in Spanish, Arabic, Russian, and Haitian Creole. There is no bailiff; none but the judge to maintain order, call the cases, and render judgments, DIY-style. Lawyers waiting for clients' cases to be called pile up outside the four small courtrooms in the cramped corridor that one translator calls the "Hall of Anxiety. " With a backlog of 4,901 cases, Philadelphia's Immigration Court, housed on the fifth floor of a federal building in Center City, is chronically overburdened and thinly staffed, and reflects the workload crisis afflicting the nation's 57 other immigration courts.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Many people settle for a job, but there are online tools that can help you choose a career that suits your personality, education, stress tolerance, and, of course, your need for money. Stressed out? At BusinessInsider.com, there's a list of "high-paying jobs for people who don't like stress" - illustrated, strangely, with a photo of a couple nursing tall glasses of beer. The list includes jobs with annual pay averaging from about $65,000 to $186,000, the latter number belonging to orthodontists, who apparently find it relaxing to realign people's teeth and jaws.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
You've seen the signs everywhere, and days before Black Friday - in your inbox, online, and screaming from store displays: Holiday doorbusters starting "TODAY!" And promises of more deals to be had on Turkey Day itself. If last year's unprecedented early store openings were perceived as a fluke, this year is proof that Black Friday is no longer the marketing hook that kicks off Christmas, Hanukkah, and all other holiday shopping. Instead, the day after Thanksgiving is taking a permanent backseat, it seems, to shopping everywhere, all the time . What began as an experiment to inspire shoppers stung by a poor economy has become the new tradition.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Feb. 24, 2010, the bull orca Tilikum, one of the star attractions at SeaWorld in Orlando, attacked and killed his trainer, Dawn Brancheau. The experienced trainer, who had worked extensively with Tilikum, was the third person the whale had killed. The incident sparked outrage, and led marine biologists and animal rights activists alike to raise an uncomfortable question: Was the attack caused, at least in part, by Tilikum's conflicted, desperate mood as a wild creature kept all his life in captivity?
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I DON'T KNOW when Philip Nace became a Philadelphia police officer. But I have to believe, when he swore an oath to protect and serve, that he didn't imagine his future would include seeing his scowling red face on a Daily News cover about bully cops. But there he was, in yesterday's story by Bill Bender about a stop and frisk. Nace and another cop harangued two pedestrians in the 25th District after the men had - sigh - said hello to a third man unidentified on the street. To write the story, Bender didn't need to rely on anyone's memories of what went down.
SPORTS
October 10, 2013 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
MINUTES INTO his introductory news conference as the Flyers' 18th head coach, Craig Berube thanked Ed Snider and Paul Holmgren for the opportunity. He said it was an honor. Then, more important, the next words out of his mouth were about his new team's play without the puck. "For me right now, I don't see our team doing a very good job without the puck," Berube said. "Everybody's going to look at, 'We only scored three goals in three games.' You want to score more goals? Do your job without the puck.
NEWS
September 22, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For the last two months, Lynda Henion has hit the Holy Redeemer Sports Medicine Center three times a week to warm up on a stationary bicycle, walk steps, and do stretching and strengthening exercises. After an accidental tumble in 2010, Henion, 71, had a pin placed in her right hip, followed a year later by a right hip replacement, followed by an operation on the meniscus in her left knee, followed by a right knee replacement in July. After all that surgery, she's eager to return to normal walking.
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