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Strike Force

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NEWS
September 16, 2008 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Organized Crime Strike Force, a prosecuting unit within the U.S. Attorney's Office that has a 20-year record of success in making cases against the Philadelphia mob, is being folded into a larger unit that will also focus on drug dealing and gang violence. The changes are expected to take place in about a month, according to Laurie Magid, the acting U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, and Linda Hoffa, head of the office's Criminal Division. Both said the move would enhance the unit's ability to make cases.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
U.S. Attorney Michael Stiles has named Robert E. Courtney III to head the Philadelphia Organized Crime Strike Force when its longtime chief, Joel Friedman, steps down in early March. "Nobody wants to see Joel leave," said Stiles. "But Bob has served the strike force well. " Courtney, 50, now Friedman's deputy, will begin his new job March 10. Courtney, a Connecticut native and son of an FBI agent-lawyer and an FBI secretary, will head all major organized crime prosecutions into La Cosa Nostra, Russian and Eastern Europe, Asian and other ethnically based criminal groups.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prosecution of mob cases in Philadelphia will be no less aggressive as a result of U.S. Attorney General Dick Thornburgh's order last week to merge 14 organized-crime strike forces - including the one here - into units in U.S. Attorneys' Offices, U.S. Attorney Michael M. Baylson said. Baylson, the top federal prosecutor in the 10-county area of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, said that the 11 strike-force prosecutors in his district would continue to focus strictly on organized crime and that Joel M. Friedman would remain in charge of the unit.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among them, they have a total of 145 years of experience as prosecutors - much of it spent in patient pursuit of the kind of massive organized crime cases that rely heavily on complex, elusive evidence that can take years to gather. Collectively, the 11 prosecutors in the local U.S. Organized Crime Strike Force have been chipping away at the Philadelphia mob for years, but their greatest victory came last fall when racketeering convictions of crime boss Nicodemo Scarfo and 16 others essentially dismantled the mob. Now, the plan is to dismantle the strike force.
SPORTS
January 6, 2012 | By Don Beideman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coach Paul Riley said Thursday that the Independence would give high priority to finding another forward when Women's Professional Soccer holds its draft in Kansas City next Friday. "Another forward from the first or second round is at the top of our agenda," said Riley, who has coached the Independence to the WPS final in their first two seasons. "We're also interested in another goalkeeper and another midfielder. " Riley made the team's draft plans known at a news conference one day after the team announced that it had re-signed forward Natasha Kai, a fan favorite.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
The word was that a Jamaican national wanted on a homicide charge in Philadelphia had settled into a Sharon Hill apartment. As the investigation developed and the information was confirmed, the Sharon Hill police knew it was time to call in the county District Attorney's Drug Strike Force. Together, the agencies, aided by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration, set up surveillance of the apartment in the 600 block of Poplar Street. The move proved fruitful. As they were preparing to surround the building at 11:55 p.m. July 18, the police said, they spotted the suspect, Robert T. Smith, and his brother, Everton Freeman Smith, leaving the apartment.
NEWS
April 3, 1989
Philadelphia's elite strike force on organized crime, which has been mowing down the local mob, would be merged into the U.S. Attorney's office if Attorney General Dick Thornburgh has his way. That would be fine so long as he can get the mob to weaken its organizational structure in the same manner. If the federal effort against organized crime gets handed to each U.S. attorney's office - where the boss and the professional staff routinely turn over with the political wind - it's only fair that the mob as well dump its career professionals and rely on short-term employees.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's low-profile war on drugs exploded yesterday with City Council President John Street opening fire on Police Commissioner Richard Neal. Street was so displeased with Neal that he savaged the commissioner's plan to beat down street-corner drug sales plaguing city neighborhoods and called Neal's performance "unacceptable. " The Street vs. Neal dustup suggests a major policy dispute between Street and Mayor Rendell. David L. Cohen, Rendell's outgoing chief of staff, did his best to paper over the clash.
NEWS
July 20, 1988 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the Gloucester County Narcotic Strike Force have added a new tool to help them fight the drug war throughout the county. Detective Sgt. Robert Ferris of the strike force said a 24-hour telephone tip line had been set up, effective today, to offer citizens a confidential way of passing along information about drug dealers and locations where drugs were being bought or sold. At a news conference at the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office on Friday, Ferris said there had been 170 narcotic arrests in the first six months of this year, compared with 51 during the same period in 1987.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
The slow-moving wheels of the government's war on drugs are rolling into Philadelphia today. After nearly a 1 1/2-year delay, Mayor Goode, Gov. Casey and state Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. were to jointly announce a major new anti-drug strike force that could bring the city millions of dollars. The money - the exact amount to be determined by the amount of work done - comes from Casey's PennFree program, which was created out of money earmarked for his failed 1989 tax reform plan.
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NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Stagehands for the Philadelphia Theatre Company went on strike Friday just as the theater was readying previews for The Mountaintop , Katori Hall's play based on the "reimagining" of events the night before the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Friday night's performance was canceled because of the strike. Saturday night, about two dozen stagehands picketed outside the theater, some yelling, "You're crossing a picket line!" to theatergoers as they arrived. The next preview is scheduled for Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
THAT BIG GUY holding forth at the cafes and coffee shops of Center City, sipping his espresso, laughing it up with friends, was a former cop who didn't hesitate to kick in a door with the police narcotics strike force. From his friendly demeanor, you wouldn't know that Michael G. Brinkley had that kind of aggression in him, but when you're a cop chasing a suspect you don't let a door get in your way. Mike Brinkley, a 15-year veteran of the force, onetime chaplain of the Guardian Civic League, and a passionate sports-car buff, died suddenly March 16. He was 52 and lived in West Philadelphia.
SPORTS
January 6, 2012 | By Don Beideman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coach Paul Riley said Thursday that the Independence would give high priority to finding another forward when Women's Professional Soccer holds its draft in Kansas City next Friday. "Another forward from the first or second round is at the top of our agenda," said Riley, who has coached the Independence to the WPS final in their first two seasons. "We're also interested in another goalkeeper and another midfielder. " Riley made the team's draft plans known at a news conference one day after the team announced that it had re-signed forward Natasha Kai, a fan favorite.
SPORTS
May 26, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Martin St. Louis and Teddy Purcell each scored twice, resilient goalie Dwayne Roloson weathered a hat trick by Boston's David Krejci, and the Tampa Bay Lightning stayed alive in the Eastern Conference finals with a 5-4 win over the visiting Boston Bruins in Game 6 last night. Game 7 is tomorrow night in Boston. The Bruins are seeking their first trip to the Stanley Cup finals in 21 years, and the Lightning will try to clinch their first appearance on hockey's biggest stage since they won their only NHL championship in 2004.
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Charlotte Shaw was working the counter of Little Slice of New York when the customer she calls Officer Bob bounded into the Camden pizza shop for Thursday lunch. It had been a while. "Woo-oo!" she shouted, showering him with confetti from a kitchen check she'd shredded for the occasion. "There aren't that many left to woo-oo!" she said. "There aren't that many left, period," said owner Pete Toso. You may remember Officer Bob Thomas from this space, the Camden cop whose disabled boy was forced by a TSA agent to walk through a Philadelphia airport checkpoint without his orthopedic braces.
NEWS
April 16, 2010 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime in 1987, police realized that drug dealers in North Philadelphia and Kensington had found a more aggressive way to sell drugs. Instead of using houses and cars, they were selling to anyone who walked up to them - open-air dealing that would spread to many corners in the city's poorest neighborhoods. The top brass came up with an idea: Create the department's first Narcotics Strike Force, a team of officers who would stake out drug territories and reel in sellers and buyers.
NEWS
September 23, 2008 | By Peter Vaira
The acting U.S. attorney for Pennsylvania's Eastern District announced last week that the office's organized-crime strike force will be merged into a unit prosecuting drug dealers. This is shortsighted. A little history: The public first became aware of the national scope of organized crime in 1957, when police in Apalachin, N.Y., raided the private home of Joseph Barbero and discovered a meeting of nearly 100 mob chieftains from across the country. It was a national meeting, and it exposed the broad geographic reach of organized crime.
NEWS
September 16, 2008 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Organized Crime Strike Force, a prosecuting unit within the U.S. Attorney's Office that has a 20-year record of success in making cases against the Philadelphia mob, is being folded into a larger unit that will also focus on drug dealing and gang violence. The changes are expected to take place in about a month, according to Laurie Magid, the acting U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, and Linda Hoffa, head of the office's Criminal Division. Both said the move would enhance the unit's ability to make cases.
NEWS
September 12, 2008 | By David O’Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Family, friends, the city's police force and its civic leaders bid farewell this afternoon to police officer Isabel Nazario, killed on duty Sept. 5 when her patrol car was struck by a stolen car. The Roman Catholic Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul was filled to overflowing with police officers, and hundreds more stood outside, as Cardinal Justin Rigali and three bishops said her funeral mass. "Once again the tragedy of violence, pain and separation has struck our community, our city, our commonwealth," Rigali said in his homily.
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