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Stroke

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NEWS
January 19, 2006 | Inquirer staff writer Josh Goldstein
Eric L. Zager, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, discussed Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's prospects of recovery from the stroke he suffered Jan. 4. Zager specializes in cerebral vascular surgery and cares for patients with strokes similar to that suffered by Sharon. "We simply do not have enough information to really give an accurate prediction as to his true prognosis. . . . In general, any elderly patient who has suffered a large hemorrhagic stroke and stayed in a coma for a prolonged period has a poor prognosis.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Gloria Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sacha Downes was taking a shower when she felt a "weird" explosion in her head. Still dripping, she managed to reach the bathroom mirror, where she was stunned to see her face drooping on the right side. She stumbled to her bedroom and fell. By the time her mother dashed upstairs, Sacha was having seizures. She recalls her dad carrying her down the steps and sliding her into an ambulance - then nothing until she awoke in a hospital. "I didn't have any idea what was going on," Sacha says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Clarence Clemons, saxophonist for Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, has suffered a stroke, according to media reports. Rolling Stone and Showbiz411.com reported last night that Clemons was ill after having the stroke at his home in Florida. Clemons, known as "The Big Man," has undergone a series of surgeries and treatments in recent years for his knees and back. Discomfort from the ailments has led him to remain seated during portions of E Street Band concerts.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | Associated Press
CHICAGO - Sen. Mark Kirk (R., Ill.) was doing better than expected after a weekend stroke and emergency surgery, his neurosurgeon said Tuesday, noting that Kirk was answering questions and even asking for his BlackBerry. Dr. Richard Fessler said Kirk, 52, was "doing very well" but said the road to recovery would be long. Kirk's stroke affected his left side, particularly movement of his face and left arm. Doctors said he might never regain full movement. It's unclear when Kirk will be able to return to work.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Theater Critic
In 1984, when Joseph Chaikin, a well-known actor and director, underwent open-heart surgery for the third time to repair a heart valve damaged by rheumatic fever, one of the gravest risks of the operation became a grim reality. Chaikin had a stroke on the operating table. "Third time, I couldn't talk. . . . I forgot my name . . . every name . . . including my name. . . . Words are abstract to me . . . words . . . I have aphasia," Chaikin said the other day in his slow, halting speech.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | Los Angeles Daily News
Former Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley was reported in serious condition yesterday after suffering a stroke while recovering from coronary bypass surgery. Bradley, 78, had the stroke at 5 a.m. yesterday at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. He had suffered a heart attack March 20 and underwent coronary surgery Wednesday. "His vital signs are very stable," said Dr. Fred Alexander, Bradley's personal physician. He said tests on Bradley's heart indicated that there has been "a very, very marked improvement in his heart functions," since the surgery.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | by Donna Petrozzello, New York Daily News
Producers of ABC's "Sports Night" have written actor Robert Guillaume's real-life stroke into the show's story line. Guillaume's character, sports-show executive producer Isaac Jaffee, will have a stroke in an episode airing March 30. Guillaume, who became ill in mid-January on the set, won't appear in the March 30 episode, but news of Jaffee's stroke will shake up the fictional "Sports Night. " In fact, Guillaume's character won't appear for the next six episodes, but cast members will talk about his progress.
NEWS
December 12, 1986 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The district attorney's office has dropped drunken-driving charges that had been filed against a Northeast Philadelphia motorist who was later discovered to have suffered a stroke. Diane Granlund, the head of the district attorney's Municipal Court unit, said yesterday that charges of drunken driving and leaving the scene of an accident were dropped against Robert Caraffa, 56, after a neurosurgeon concluded that Caraffa lost control of the car he was driving Oct. 17 as a result of the stroke.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Middle-aged men whose mothers died from a stroke were three times more likely than other men their age to have strokes, according to a newly released study. The report by Swedish researchers in today's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that heredity may play an important role in who is most likely to suffer a stroke - the nation's third-leading killer. "There seems to be, for the first time based on a prospective study, evidence that a family history of stroke . . . is an important risk factor for stroke," said Philip A. Wolf, a stroke specialist at the Framingham Heart Study.
SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stu Ingraham has utilized an anchored stroke with a long putter for the last 23 years, a span during which he has won Philadelphia Section PGA player of the year honors on eight occasions including last year. So Ingraham strongly disagreed Tuesday with the joint decision by the U.S. Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews to ban an anchored putting stroke, either with a long putter or a belly putter, saying the stroke goes against the traditional golf swing where a club is gripped with both hands away from the body.
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SPORTS
April 18, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
READING, Pa. - Dylan Cozens looks like a football player. He is 6-foot-6 and 250 pounds. The hulking rightfielder is the tallest position player in the entire Phillies organization. And for a moment, it seemed as if football was where he was headed. Cozens played just one season of high school football. Randy Cozens wanted to keep his son off the gridiron after a pair of knee surgeries in the late 1970s ruined his NFL career before he even played a regular-season snap with the Denver Broncos.
NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
Not long ago, a member of the Philadelphia Orchestra's leadership wrote me with an insight. In talking to musicians after concerts, he had gleaned that interpretation came from the musicians themselves, and not the conductor - and in fact the orchestra was able to play brilliantly without any podium guidance at all. The idea that a conductor could stand in front of an orchestra and have little or no impact seemed especially fanciful Thursday night...
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
At a coffee shop, Brian Mottolo will allow other customers to go ahead of him. He'll wait in the back, practicing his order in his head. When it's all clear, he'll approach the counter and say, "Medium dark roast. Cream and sugar. " When Mottolo, 52, shared that story during a meeting at Magee Rehab recently, his audience lauded him. "You've been practicing!" speech language pathologist Sarah Lantz said. "That's good. That's real good. " Mottolo has aphasia, the loss of the ability to use language because of damage to the brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, STAFF WRITER
Emergency departments at two hospitals - one in Montgomery County - initially missed a stroke diagnosis in more than a fifth of patients later found to have had strokes, according to a study published this month in the journal Stroke. Rather than an indictment of poor diagnostic skills, the study shows how difficult it can be to identify certain kinds of strokes, said David Weisman, one of the report's authors and a neurologist at Abington Neurological Associates, a private physician group.
NEWS
February 23, 2016 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
Out of nowhere, WDAS-FM radio personality Patty Jackson collapsed. She didn't stumble over anything. But between her house and garage, Jackson hit the ground. Looking back, the popular broadcaster remembers that her right side had been feeling weak. But she didn't think much about it. It happened last Nov. 11. Jackson was working at the station seven days a week, and also doing numerous personal appearances, including her weekly Friday night happy hour at Warmdaddy's at Riverview Plaza.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A large national study suggests that patients at risk of heart disease can reduce their chances of heart attack, stroke, and death by lowering their systolic blood pressure by even more than what is currently recommended. Authors of the widely anticipated research, published Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine, said the more aggressive approach makes sense despite an increased risk of fainting and kidney problems. Currently, patients at risk of heart disease are told to lower their systolic pressure - the higher of the two numbers from the measurement in the doctor's office - to 130. Study authors said patients who lowered that number to about 120 by taking additional drugs were better off than those who made it only to the low- to mid-130s.
SPORTS
October 28, 2015 | By Mark Whited, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lenape's Liz Mercado, Delaney Stimson, Caroline McKenna, and Kristen Viggiano each scored in a shootout at sixth-seeded Hightstown on Monday to give the 11th-seeded Indians a 4-2 win on strokes in a Central Jersey Group 4 field hockey first-round game. The game was tied, 1-1, at the end of overtime. Viggiano got Lenape on the board with a first-half goal off an assist from Kelly Bartolomeo. Alie Louie recorded five saves to earn the win. S.J. Group 4 First Round. Christina Orio had a hat trick in host No. 7 Cherokee's 7-1 win over No. 10 Millville.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Amber King, For The Inquirer
A patient was admitted to the hospital for a stroke caused by blood clotting in the brain and was treated with two anticoagulants, or blood thinners: heparin and warfarin. Warfarin can be tricky to administer, so the degree of clotting in the patient's blood was monitored regularly to make sure the dose didn't need adjustment. Because the drug takes several days to reach its full effect, many patients also are given heparin intravenously, which acts immediately. Also, because of the stroke, the patient needed a feeding tube.
SPORTS
June 1, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY, N.J. - A couple of forces were at work trying to keep the LPGA's best players from truly enjoying the second round of the ShopRite LPGA Classic on Saturday. The first was the breeze that freshened just as some of the opening-day leaders started in the afternoon, making club selection a true guessing game. If that wasn't difficult enough, the greens at the Bay Course of the Stockton Seaview Golf Club and Resort had enough bumps to throw even the purest-stroked putt off line.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In older patients with atrial fibrillation, cardiologists increasingly are using a snare-like device to close off a small sac in the heart thought to be the source of clots that can cause stroke in those with the abnormal heart rhythm. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not approve the Lariat device for that specific purpose, and now a new University of Pennsylvania-led study says this approach, though legal, too often leads to urgent surgery and even death. Several area hospitals have used the device, including one that is part of Penn's own health system - Pennsylvania Hospital - though physicians there have stopped.
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