CollectionsStrom Thurmond
IN THE NEWS

Strom Thurmond

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post and USA Today
Sen. Strom Thurmond (R., S.C.) and his wife since 1968, Nancy, have split, they announced yesterday. The couple, married when she was 22 and he was 66, have four children, ages 15 to 19. They made separate statements, but neither indicated that a divorce was brewing. "At this point I would like to be able to pursue several career options and some measure of independence," said Nancy, 44. "I care deeply for Strom. . . . Public life carries with it heavy responsibilities, loneliness, extreme pressures, stress and family sacrifices, often with devastating consequences.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | By Joe Patrick Bean
Rarely has the health of a U.S. senator so engaged the attention of all of his colleagues, the White House and political operatives from both parties in Washington and back in his home state. But never before has the upper house of Congress experienced such a combination of circumstances as it does now. The Senate is evenly split - 50 Republicans and 50 Democrats - with GOP Vice President Dick Cheney holding the tiebreaking vote. And his health is far from certain, given his long history of heart disease and a recent angioplasty.
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | By Tom Infield and Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
She was smart, attractive, a student leader, an accomplished public speaker. Essie Mae Washington was among the bright lights in the Class of 1945 at S. Horace Scott High School in the Chester County steel town of Coatesville. She was also the secret daughter of Strom Thurmond - the product of a sexual union between the 22-year-old son of the most prominent family in Edgefield, S.C., and the 16-year-old black girl who cleaned the family's house. Thurmond's relatives stepped forward yesterday, six months after his death at age 100, to acknowledge that Washington, now 78 and using the married name of Williams, was, indeed, the senator's child.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | By Michelle R. Davis, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Just last month, after his third visit to the hospital in a few weeks, 96-year-old U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond strode out of Walter Reed Army Medical Center here, got in a car, and went to work. He didn't stop at his condo, he didn't take a few days off. Instead, the South Carolina Republican, still weak and fatigued from a recent prostate operation, went directly to his Senate office. The oldest and longest-serving senator in American history still lives alone. He goes to work nearly every day, and at an age when many would be content to take it easy, he rarely misses a vote.
NEWS
January 22, 2004
I'M WRITING to complain about the utter insensitivity of the article you printed about Charlotte, N.C., and the Panthers. (It appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer.) I am a former resident of suburban Philadelphia, and have lived in Pinehurst, N.C., for five years. I am still a fan of the Philadelphia teams, Eagles, Phillies, Flyers and 76ers. And I am absolutely appalled at the audacity of your reporter to write what appeared in his article. I'm also a bit flabbergasted that your editors would print such nonsense.
NEWS
February 7, 2013
Essie Mae Washington-Williams, 87, the mixed-race daughter of onetime segregationist Sen. Strom Thurmond who kept her parentage secret for more than 70 years, died Sunday of natural causes in Columbia, S.C. She was the daughter of Thurmond and his family's 16-year-old black maid. The identity of her famous father had been rumored for decades in political circles and the black community. She later said she kept his secret because "he trusted me, and I respected him. " She was born in 1925 and was raised in Coatesville by her mother's sister and the sister's husband, Mary and John Washington.
NEWS
December 27, 2003 | By Diane McWhorter
Editor's Note: The following was published in Slate, the online magazine, shortly after the death of Strom Thurmond this past summer. The Daily News is republishing the piece following Essie Mae Washington Williams' recent announcement that she is Thurmond's daughter. In all the words spent on Strom Thurmond's life and times since his death, I saw no acknowledgment of the most interesting of his sundry racial legacies. She is Essie Mae Washington Williams, a widowed former school teacher in her 70s, living in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | By Lee Bandy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ordinarily, a person of his advanced years would be considered too old to run for public office, acknowledges South Carolina Republican Sen. Strom Thurmond. But, as he asserts - and state voters seem to agree - Thurmond, at 87, is no ordinary octogenarian. "Physically, I'm probably in my 50s," he boasts. He spends nearly an hour every morning jogging, exercising and lifting weights. "Feel those muscles," he said, flexing his right arm in front of a visitor. Thurmond, the oldest member of Congress, officially announced his candidacy for re-election yesterday, 36 years after he was elected to the Senate on a write-in ballot in 1954.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | By Matt Stearns INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As he turns 100 years old today, Sen. Strom Thurmond - onetime presidential candidate, former segregationist, famed connoisseur of beautiful women - may be best known just for hanging on. But both his supporters and detractors say that is not fair to Thurmond, a South Carolina Republican. For while his legislative achievements are scant, his impact on American politics was enormous, and reverberates to this day. Thurmond - older than the airplane, older than the World Series - is the oldest person ever to serve in the Senate.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | BY DONALD KAUL
Unfurl the flags, and run them up the flagpoles. Let the church bells peal, and the choirs sing hosannas. And while you're at it, give me a drum roll. I have an astonishing announcement. Strom Thurmond did a witty thing. What? You're not surprised? You don't think that's a big deal? You don't know Strom Thurmond then. Strom Thurmond is the Republican senator from South Carolina (He used to be a Democratic senator, but he lost his heart to Barry Goldwater). He is famous for two things: running for president against Harry Truman in 1948 as a fourth party candidate, and not being witty.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 7, 2013
Essie Mae Washington-Williams, 87, the mixed-race daughter of onetime segregationist Sen. Strom Thurmond who kept her parentage secret for more than 70 years, died Sunday of natural causes in Columbia, S.C. She was the daughter of Thurmond and his family's 16-year-old black maid. The identity of her famous father had been rumored for decades in political circles and the black community. She later said she kept his secret because "he trusted me, and I respected him. " She was born in 1925 and was raised in Coatesville by her mother's sister and the sister's husband, Mary and John Washington.
NEWS
January 12, 2010
I SPENT A disquieting weekend trying to figure out why I wasn't as outraged as Michael Steele is by Harry Reid's supposedly "racist" remarks. Hard to dispute Steele's credibility. He is, after all, both light-skinned and articulate. So I leaned a little closer to the tube as he fulminated on the talk-show circuit Sunday. Steele was telling America that Reid had committed the unpardonable sin of noticing that Barack Obama was light-skinned and did not speak in a black dialect.
NEWS
February 1, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 62 years, she kept the secret. It was the kind of burdensome, mind-numbing secret that, if revealed, could have brought down one of the South's favorite sons and changed the course of political history. But none of that happened because Essie Mae Washington-Williams kept her mouth shut, and Strom Thurmond lived to be 100. And when the venerable politician died in 2003, Washington-Williams finally felt free to tell the world that she was the segregationist senator's black daughter.
NEWS
January 22, 2004
I'M WRITING to complain about the utter insensitivity of the article you printed about Charlotte, N.C., and the Panthers. (It appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer.) I am a former resident of suburban Philadelphia, and have lived in Pinehurst, N.C., for five years. I am still a fan of the Philadelphia teams, Eagles, Phillies, Flyers and 76ers. And I am absolutely appalled at the audacity of your reporter to write what appeared in his article. I'm also a bit flabbergasted that your editors would print such nonsense.
NEWS
December 27, 2003 | By Diane McWhorter
Editor's Note: The following was published in Slate, the online magazine, shortly after the death of Strom Thurmond this past summer. The Daily News is republishing the piece following Essie Mae Washington Williams' recent announcement that she is Thurmond's daughter. In all the words spent on Strom Thurmond's life and times since his death, I saw no acknowledgment of the most interesting of his sundry racial legacies. She is Essie Mae Washington Williams, a widowed former school teacher in her 70s, living in Los Angeles.
NEWS
December 19, 2003 | By ELMER SMITH
HE WAS a man of his times. That is the familiar refrain that gets repeated when one of these indiscretions is exhumed from the crypt where men of their times bury the past. We heard it when DNA tests proved Thomas Jefferson had fathered Eston Hemmings with a slave girl named Sally Hemmings. It wasn't the first note sounded. First comes the emphatic denial, attended by an air of "how dare they besmirch the memory of the great man. " After that overture, we hear the second movement, where the ring of truth swells to an undeniable crescendo.
NEWS
December 18, 2003 | By WILLIAM BUNCH bunchw@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
AMERICA MAY be shocked to finally learn that political legend and segregationist Strom Thurmond, had a biracial daughter out of wedlock. But then, Essie Mae Washington-Williams revealed last night that she was fairly stunned, too, when she found out about her father in 1941, at age 16. Her mother "did not mention anything about color," Williams said last night in her first-ever TV interview, on CBS's "60 Minutes II. " She added, with a laugh, "and...
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | By Tom Infield and Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
She was smart, attractive, a student leader, an accomplished public speaker. Essie Mae Washington was among the bright lights in the Class of 1945 at S. Horace Scott High School in the Chester County steel town of Coatesville. She was also the secret daughter of Strom Thurmond - the product of a sexual union between the 22-year-old son of the most prominent family in Edgefield, S.C., and the 16-year-old black girl who cleaned the family's house. Thurmond's relatives stepped forward yesterday, six months after his death at age 100, to acknowledge that Washington, now 78 and using the married name of Williams, was, indeed, the senator's child.
NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a mixed message. At a time when Republicans hope to make the party more attractive to black voters, their own Senate leader has publicly voiced nostalgia for the Jim Crow segregation era. This is not the first time Mississippi Sen. Trent Lott has undercut the GOP's "minority outreach" aspirations, but his remarks last Thursday, immortalized on C-Span, are bound to complicate President Bush's efforts to sell the party to wary African Americans....
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | By Matt Stearns INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As he turns 100 years old today, Sen. Strom Thurmond - onetime presidential candidate, former segregationist, famed connoisseur of beautiful women - may be best known just for hanging on. But both his supporters and detractors say that is not fair to Thurmond, a South Carolina Republican. For while his legislative achievements are scant, his impact on American politics was enormous, and reverberates to this day. Thurmond - older than the airplane, older than the World Series - is the oldest person ever to serve in the Senate.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|