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Stucco

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LIVING
February 12, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Two years ago, we moved to a five-year-old townhouse. Last year, the builder initiated a project of inspecting all the stucco exteriors for moisture penetration into the exterior sheathing and studs underneath. Many inspected units, including ours, were found to have damage attributed to improper application of the tar-paper wrap layer under the wire and stucco layers. The builder corrected the situation by removing all the stucco, wire, and paper; repairing any sheathing and stud damage; and then re-stuccoing.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Here are more painting tips, this time about stucco, for which I get many, many questions, especially from Philadelphians living in a row that is a house or two short, with party walls that need repainting. I turn, as usual, to Debbie Zimmer at the Dow Chemical Paint Quality Institute in Spring House. She says stucco can be successfully painted by following certain procedures. As with most painting projects, surface preparation is key. "Start by making sure that the surface of your stucco is sound," Zimmer said.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
First we wrote a piece about painting stucco, using information from the Paint Quality Institute. Then, we ran an e-mail from a contractor in Iowa saying you shouldn't paint stucco. Today, we're going back to the Paint Quality Institute for its take on the Iowa reader's e-mail. But first, we'd like to turn over the rostrum to Al Kelly of Stevens, Pa., with his views on stucco. Kelly's view, or that of his sainted father, is that paint is best applied to stucco with a brush.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Anna Iwanicki hired a contractor to stucco her 19th-century brick-and-stucco buildings in the downtown historic district, she thought she was rescuing two crumbling monuments of a bygone era at a price she could afford. She didn't plan on becoming a test case for the borough's historic preservation law. She hired contractor Robert McCliman, who has done restoration work for 30 years. McCliman gave her two estimates: $10,000 to stucco the two adjoining rowhouses, or at least $20,000 to re-brick their fronts.
REAL_ESTATE
June 15, 1997 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
In June 1995, Wilmington, N.C., forensic engineer Glenn Davis received a phone call from a woman complaining that her two-year-old house was rotting away. One of the front windows had rotted out in less than a year, had been replaced by the builder, and had quickly rotted out again, according to Davis. The culprit was moisture. The exterior of the house was clad in a polymer-based, synthetic stucco-like material known as EIFS (pronounced eefs). Gaps around the window frame had not been properly caulked, so water had seeped behind the EIFS and had become trapped.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
The summerlike weather yesterday was ideal for working outside, as these Eugene Striker Construction employees found in applying stucco to a building at 401 Callowhill St. The crew: Steven Goodman, Robert Moffatt and Mark Stoica.
REAL_ESTATE
February 27, 2000 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The term picturesque is often used to describe the Queen Anne style of architecture, developed by English architect Richard Norman Shaw and popularized in this country in the late 19th century. The term, with its evocation of a sense of quiet, elegant beauty, also describes the Queen Anne-style Reeve-Reid House on Bishop Hollow Road in Newtown Square. Dating to 1897, the house was built on a 350-acre estate owned by Mary Irwin Agnew, the widow of the Philadelphia surgeon portrayed by Thomas Eakins in his famous painting, The Agnew Clinic.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
  Here's help from readers for readers - this time about subway tile. A couple wanted to know what to do about discolored subway tiles in their 1930s-era shower. Was there a way to clean them or could they be replaced with something similar, they asked. Jeanne Gallagher of Philadelphia had a similar situation in the tub surround area of her late-1920s bathroom. One thing that finally helped make the job doable - and not horrendously expensive - was to stop trying to match the tile that needed to be replaced (1920s Ming Green turned out to be a completely different shade than 1980s Ming Green!
NEWS
August 15, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first surprise came in February, as they inspected the stucco on a Haddonfield house before repainting it. They removed pieces around the windows and discovered beautifully preserved red brick. Over the next few months, Mark Welsh and his son Ted knocked off 10 tons of stucco, revealing a side of a historic house that hadn't been seen for centuries. Out of its shell emerged the stately home of Thomas Redman, a prominent Quaker businessman who settled in town in the 1730s and owned a portion of the colonial-era building that houses the Indian King Tavern.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Janice Sachen of Chicago offers what she says is a sure cure for that cat-urine smell. "My older cat started urinating on the basement floor and she would always go back to the same spot because she could smell the urine. "I tried everything to mask the smell to no avail. Finally I tried peroxide, the regular drugstore kind, although there are stronger concentrations available at chemical supply houses. "I sprayed a full-strength solution on the concrete area, and it neutralized the smell.
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REAL_ESTATE
July 27, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Chester County contractor Jeff Morrison looked at the forgettable facade of Jennifer and Michael Mankowski's home, a stuccoed, farmhouse-style exterior. But what he actually saw was a circa-1900 house begging to emerge. His partner, designer Courtney Kish, saw it, too. They envisioned using different textures (stone, cedar shake, faux-wood siding, and some stucco) to delineate the house's existing separate sections - a style that defined the classic Chester County farmhouse look.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Janice Sachen of Chicago offers what she says is a sure cure for that cat-urine smell. "My older cat started urinating on the basement floor and she would always go back to the same spot because she could smell the urine. "I tried everything to mask the smell to no avail. Finally I tried peroxide, the regular drugstore kind, although there are stronger concentrations available at chemical supply houses. "I sprayed a full-strength solution on the concrete area, and it neutralized the smell.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
First we wrote a piece about painting stucco, using information from the Paint Quality Institute. Then, we ran an e-mail from a contractor in Iowa saying you shouldn't paint stucco. Today, we're going back to the Paint Quality Institute for its take on the Iowa reader's e-mail. But first, we'd like to turn over the rostrum to Al Kelly of Stevens, Pa., with his views on stucco. Kelly's view, or that of his sainted father, is that paint is best applied to stucco with a brush.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
  Here's help from readers for readers - this time about subway tile. A couple wanted to know what to do about discolored subway tiles in their 1930s-era shower. Was there a way to clean them or could they be replaced with something similar, they asked. Jeanne Gallagher of Philadelphia had a similar situation in the tub surround area of her late-1920s bathroom. One thing that finally helped make the job doable - and not horrendously expensive - was to stop trying to match the tile that needed to be replaced (1920s Ming Green turned out to be a completely different shade than 1980s Ming Green!
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Here are more painting tips, this time about stucco, for which I get many, many questions, especially from Philadelphians living in a row that is a house or two short, with party walls that need repainting. I turn, as usual, to Debbie Zimmer at the Dow Chemical Paint Quality Institute in Spring House. She says stucco can be successfully painted by following certain procedures. As with most painting projects, surface preparation is key. "Start by making sure that the surface of your stucco is sound," Zimmer said.
LIVING
February 12, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Two years ago, we moved to a five-year-old townhouse. Last year, the builder initiated a project of inspecting all the stucco exteriors for moisture penetration into the exterior sheathing and studs underneath. Many inspected units, including ours, were found to have damage attributed to improper application of the tar-paper wrap layer under the wire and stucco layers. The builder corrected the situation by removing all the stucco, wire, and paper; repairing any sheathing and stud damage; and then re-stuccoing.
NEWS
December 3, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every five years, Kevin and Corinne Cody celebrate their wedding anniversary by boarding an airplane to distant destinations. When the emerald year, No. 55, arrived two years ago, the Doylestown couple dreamed up a 10-day journey to Italy, the birthplace of Corinne's grandmother. And they decided to invite the extended clan - no small enterprise. "Our kids live all over the country," Corinne says of her brood of five. "We go to Italy to get together. " Spouses, significant others, and grandchildren swelled the traveling party to 24, ages 5 to 77. Accommodations were the tricky part - what hotel or resort could fit them on one floor?
NEWS
August 15, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first surprise came in February, as they inspected the stucco on a Haddonfield house before repainting it. They removed pieces around the windows and discovered beautifully preserved red brick. Over the next few months, Mark Welsh and his son Ted knocked off 10 tons of stucco, revealing a side of a historic house that hadn't been seen for centuries. Out of its shell emerged the stately home of Thomas Redman, a prominent Quaker businessman who settled in town in the 1730s and owned a portion of the colonial-era building that houses the Indian King Tavern.
NEWS
July 7, 2006 | By Sally Friedman
Once upon a time - just a few weeks ago, in fact - I was perfectly sane. I didn't clutch tiny little squares of paint-chip cards in my hand, squinting endlessly at colors with names that either made me hungry or made me laugh. Once upon a time, I didn't spend the better part of countless days studying the 650 varieties of off-whites on color charts, asking perfect strangers what they thought of "buff" or "desert oasis" or perhaps "shifting sands. " Before the search for several paint colors began, I read books.
NEWS
September 7, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Robin, 86, a builder who along with his father helped save the architectural extravaganza of Hollywood, Montgomery County, died of cardiac arrhythmia Aug. 16 at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Robin was a longtime resident of Richboro, Bucks County. Nestled in the western tip of Abington Township, Hollywood - actually 120 homes that evoke Los Angeles during a more glamorous era - was born in the mid-1920s under developer Gustav Weber. Weber, however, abandoned the project, and it went into bankruptcy during the Depression.
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