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NEWS
July 7, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Delaware County woman who had sex with a student from the private school where she was a teaching assistant pleaded guilty yesterday in county court to corrupting the morals of a child. Judge Charles C. Keeler sentenced Celia Crowley, 41, of the 100 block of Fairview Road, Woodlyn, to two years of probation for having sex with the teenage boy for two years. The boy attended Woodlyn Christian School in Ridley Township, where Crowley taught at the time. Her plea was part of an arrangement worked out because the boy's family - who considered Crowley a friend - did not want her to go to jail and wanted to spare the boy from testifying, said Deputy District Attorney A. Sheldon Kovach.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | By Sabrina Walters, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Some black alumni of Camden County College, angry that an African American dean did not make the final list in the search for a new college president, have asked college officials to reconsider. Jacquelyn McLaughlin, dean of student affairs for 17 years and a member of the administration for 23 years, was not on a list of seven finalists released last week. Two African Americans and a female administrator from Philadelphia were on the list. Bob Barringer, interim college president and a consultant to the search committee, said the board of trustees had asked him not to consider candidates employed at the college.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Listen up, college freshmen. Soon you will be staring at banners festooned across your campus, bearing this message: Welcome, Class of 1996. Ignore them. There's a good chance that you, or the person sitting next to you in orientation, isn't going to make it out in four years. But that's OK. It doesn't mean you're dumb. Or lazy. You're just part of the trend. In the last decade, the number of college students who take longer than four years to graduate has risen dramatically.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Cheryl Squadrito, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Jarrell, the newly named deputy director of communications in the U.S. Department of the Interior and a former Ridley Township resident, had a little trouble communicating to a Hollywood film crew that he was not a moving man. Dressed casually, and ready to get some extra work done over a recent weekend, Jarrell walked into his office overlooking the Washington Monument and was greeted by a woman who said, "Good, you're here. Now move these boxes. " The crew, which was filming a movie about a lawyer in Washington soon after President John F. Kennedy's death, had selected his office for a scene because of its pleasant view, and unbeknown to Jarrell had invaded his work space.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
The Marple Newtown High School English department has dedicated a courtyard garden to the memory of Terry Fridericks and Betty Giordano. Ceremonies were held May 22. Fridericks, who died in 1987, was an English teacher and department head at the school. Giordano, who died in 1988, was the English department secretary. "They guided us on how to be teachers and caring professionals," said Debbie Bonder, a teacher in the English department. "The department was deeply saddened by their deaths and really wanted to do something to honor them.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Monica L. Williams, Special to The Inquirer
Amanda Blair, a junior at North Penn High School, will be heading for Washington April 28. Blair is part of a group of students being sponsored by Union Carbide's facilities to attend a special weeklong congressional seminar. The program is organized by the Washington Workshops Foundation, a nonprofit educational organization. Students spend the week meeting with senators, representatives and other government leaders and attend legislative and committee meetings. Informal classroom sessions provide students with basic instruction on the governmental process.
NEWS
June 25, 1986 | By Nicole Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
It was uncommon for him to remain as long as he did, surmised Harmon Pierce, who, for seven years, has served as president of Burlington County College. On June 11, Pierce announced that he was resigning to take a position as chief executive officer of Pennsylvania State University's Hazleton campus in Luzerne County. "It is unusual for someone to stay 10 years in a presidency," said Pierce, 52. "Looking back on it, I had opportunities to make a change in the past, but this one was different.
NEWS
April 2, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Temple University president Peter J. Liacouras said yesterday he favors a "controlled" introduction of liquor to the campus but wants to keep the five blocks of N. Broad Street near the school "liquor-free. " Liacouras told members of the Temple board of trustees that he would agree to one of four proposals made last month by a committee of students and administrators studying whether to end the 102-year-old tradition prohibiting liquor on the North Philadelphia campus. He said the present policy should be "restated" to allow school officials to "explore" the possibility of putting a restaurant serving beer and wine within campus boundaries.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Black students at Drexel University are rallying in support of a popular administrator who was among 24 non-faculty staff fired last month in a cost- cutting move. The students are angered because they regarded Denauvo M. Robinson, former special programs director for Drexel's Division of Student Affairs, as the only high-ranking staff member able adequately to meet the needs of Drexel's minority student population. "He was always there to field our questions and hear our concerns," said George Hanson, spokesman for Drexel's Black Student Union.
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