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Student Financial Aid

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NEWS
April 24, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The May 1 deadline is approaching for students planning to renew applications for financial aid with the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency. Students seeking grant aid for the first time or who plan to enroll in business or trade schools, hospital schools of nursing, or two-year vocational programs at community or junior colleges have until Aug. 1 to submit their applications, according to State Sen. Jim Gerlach (R., Chester). CARING WINNERS Two high school students in the West Chester Area School District have been named "champions of caring" for making substantial contributions to the community through their volunteer efforts.
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A for-profit career college agreed to settle federal allegations yesterday that it failed to provide its students with the educational program it promised. CHI Institute, of Broomall, will pay $1.6 million to resolve allegations that it had misled students and the federal government about the availability of externships in its surgical-technology program, U.S. attorneys announced. The so-called surg-tech program included both classroom time and field training in a clinical setting, at a hospital or surgery center.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
'TIS THE season for stockings, car commercials, wish lists, egg nog and scammers. With the student financial-aid application season beginning soon, state officials are reminding students and families that they may be contacted by individuals or companies via email, social media or traditional mail, offering assistance in securing scholarship money for a fee. Some of the organizations are legitimate; others are not. Families can avoid scams...
NEWS
March 22, 1993
Byron White, who announced his retirement Friday after three decades on the United States Supreme Court, was an example of an historical truth some presidents learn the hard way: Supreme Court justices don't always turn out as expected. Earl Warren, the Eisenhower appointee expected to be a conservative, eventually personified the court's onetime liberal tilt. White was just the opposite; he started out a moderate liberal like his president, John F. Kennedy, and ended up an almost-certain vote for the court's conservative wing.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six West Africans living in the Philadelphia area were indicted by a federal grand jury yesterday on charges that they paid U.S. citizens to marry them, thus enabling them to qualify as permanent resident aliens and apply for federal student financial aid. Although the five indictments were not related, Assistant U.S. Attorney David M. Howard said they showed how "incredibly widespread this practice is among the student alien community. " "It's a tremendous problem," Howard added.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer khans@phillynews.com, 215-854-5713
GET READY FOR a media blitz about Philadelphia Catholic schools. Choose My Future, a new archdiocesan marketing campaign, aims to boost enrollment in the 17 Catholic high schools of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia through online and radio advertisements. A newly retooled website also informs potential students. The program is "part of a larger effort to reinvigorate Catholic education and reengage our enthusiastic and devoted alumni by highlighting the individual excellence and collective greatness of the Catholic high schools," said Samuel Casey Carter, chief executive officer of the Faith in the Future Foundation, which provides strategic management for the city's Catholic schools.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. John M. Driscoll, whose 12-year tenure as president of Villanova University is longer than any other in the school's 145-year-history, yesterday announced that he would retire at the end of August. During his presidency, Father Driscoll oversaw the successful completion of two major fund-raising campaigns and the school received national academic and athletic recognition. Father Driscoll, 64, said health was a factor in his decision to step down. Last spring, he underwent quintuple bypass surgery and was fitted with a pacemaker.
NEWS
October 6, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple and St. Joseph's Universities began ambitious fund-raising campaigns this week aimed at expanding and improving facilities, hiring more faculty, and offering increased student financial aid. At Temple, the comprehensive campaign is the first in the university's history, with a goal of $350 million for a wide range of projects by 2009, the university's 125th anniversary. It has raised $253 million. Gifts to the campaign will affect almost every corner of the university, from restoring the Baptist Temple on North Broad Street and completing facilities to building the endowment and funding academic, research and community programs, as well as scholarships for many of the 36,000 students.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Undergraduates attending St. Joseph's University will pay about 16 percent more next fall as a result of recently announced tuition increases. Business and science majors will see their tuition bills for the 1989-90 academic year rise by 15.6 percent, from $7,700 to $8,900. Tuition for social science and humanities students will jump by 16 percent, from $7,400 to $8,600. The higher rate for business and science majors covers laboratory fees and computer costs. The tuition increases, the largest at St. Joseph's since 1981, represent the steepest percentage jump among the handful of area colleges and universities that have announced their rates for the 1989-90 school year.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | BY JOSEPH F. BURKE
Regarding Dan Geringer's columns about the reported expulsion from La Salle University of a student, Jennifer Curran, I would like to clear up some misconceptions. In his first column, Geringer stated that Assistant Director of Resident Life Alan Wendell refused to discuss with him or Ms. Curran's parents the reported disciplinary decision. This is nothing more than what the law requires. The university is prohibited by federal law from even acknowledging whether Ms. Curran has been the subject of disciplinary proceedings (Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974)
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NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University undergraduates will pay $600 more in tuition in the fall. In-state students will pay $14,006 in tuition, up from $13,406, and those from out of state will pay $24,032, up from $23,432. Mandatory student-activity fees, assessed on top of tuition, will remain at $690. The university's trustees approved the new tuition schedule at their meeting on Thursday. They also increased funding for student financial aid by more than $9.6 million. The amount set aside to aid students now totals approximately $100 million.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
To address the soaring cost of higher education, President Obama pledged Thursday to develop a college rating system that would tie federal financial aid to performance in areas such as tuition, graduation rates, percentage of low-income students, and debt load of graduates. Students attending better-performing colleges would receive larger federal Pell grants and more affordable student loans - a proposal that would require congressional approval. The nation awards more than $150 billion annually in student financial aid. "Not enough colleges have been working to figure out how do we control costs," Obama said Thursday morning at the University at Buffalo, the first stop on a two-day bus tour in New York state and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
'TIS THE season for stockings, car commercials, wish lists, egg nog and scammers. With the student financial-aid application season beginning soon, state officials are reminding students and families that they may be contacted by individuals or companies via email, social media or traditional mail, offering assistance in securing scholarship money for a fee. Some of the organizations are legitimate; others are not. Families can avoid scams...
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer khans@phillynews.com, 215-854-5713
GET READY FOR a media blitz about Philadelphia Catholic schools. Choose My Future, a new archdiocesan marketing campaign, aims to boost enrollment in the 17 Catholic high schools of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia through online and radio advertisements. A newly retooled website also informs potential students. The program is "part of a larger effort to reinvigorate Catholic education and reengage our enthusiastic and devoted alumni by highlighting the individual excellence and collective greatness of the Catholic high schools," said Samuel Casey Carter, chief executive officer of the Faith in the Future Foundation, which provides strategic management for the city's Catholic schools.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Rutgers University will raise tuition and fees 2.5 percent for in-state undergraduate students, its board of governors decided Wednesday. Students protesting outside the board's meeting in New Brunswick had called for a tuition freeze. Tuition and fees for a typical in-state undergraduate living on the university's main New Brunswick campus in the next academic year will rise $318, to $13,073. Room and board charges will go up $206, to $10,970. The total cost for the typical student adds up to $24,043, an overall increase of about 2.2 percent.
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A for-profit career college agreed to settle federal allegations yesterday that it failed to provide its students with the educational program it promised. CHI Institute, of Broomall, will pay $1.6 million to resolve allegations that it had misled students and the federal government about the availability of externships in its surgical-technology program, U.S. attorneys announced. The so-called surg-tech program included both classroom time and field training in a clinical setting, at a hospital or surgery center.
NEWS
November 19, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann has donated $100,000 to help fund undergraduate student research, the university announced yesterday. It's the second gift that Gutmann and her husband, Michael Doyle, have made to the university since she became president in June 2004, bringing their total donation to $250,000. "It's one of the experiences that makes students at Penn really excited about their undergraduate time here and I thought that it would be important to make a gift that supported students having the kind of undergraduate experiences I had," she said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
January 9, 2008
College-bound seniors and their parents can get help completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form at 50 workshops throughout the state on Feb. 9. The FAFSA is a federal form that all families need to submit to determine if they qualify for almost all forms of need-based financial assistance, including the Pennsylvania State Grant, Federal Pell Grant, many scholarships and institutional awards, and low-cost student loans....
NEWS
October 6, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple and St. Joseph's Universities began ambitious fund-raising campaigns this week aimed at expanding and improving facilities, hiring more faculty, and offering increased student financial aid. At Temple, the comprehensive campaign is the first in the university's history, with a goal of $350 million for a wide range of projects by 2009, the university's 125th anniversary. It has raised $253 million. Gifts to the campaign will affect almost every corner of the university, from restoring the Baptist Temple on North Broad Street and completing facilities to building the endowment and funding academic, research and community programs, as well as scholarships for many of the 36,000 students.
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