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Student Groups

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NEWS
February 7, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Black Student Union. African American Student League. Black Culture Club. African American Student Union. Black Students United. Their names are as varied as the hues of their membership, but the mission of black student organizations today essentially is the same as it was years ago - to serve as cultural, educational, academic and social support systems for students of color. Although part of a generation that theoretically espouses a "Hey, drop the color thing and let's all just be human beings" mentality, leaders insist that reality makes it necessary for such groups to continue to exist.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of more than 50 students at the University of Pennsylvania stormed out of a packed meeting of the school's University Council yesterday after the advisory body failed to adopt a student proposal for mandatory classes in racial awareness. The council - an 87-member group of faculty members, administrators and students that is an adivsory body to Penn President Sheldon Hackney - agreed to take up the student proposal for racial-awareness classes at its next meeting, which is scheduled for December.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - The state attorney general assured a group of Muslim leaders Wednesday that a New York City police unit that conducted surveillance of Muslim businesses, religious leaders, and student groups was no longer operating in New Jersey. Jeffrey Chiesa made the remarks during the first meeting of an outreach committee he formed to repair relations between law enforcement and Muslims in the wake of revelations about the New York Police Department's surveillance tactics. Paul Loriquet, a spokesman for the attorney general, confirmed that Chiesa said during the closed-door meeting that the NYPD's Demographics Unit was no longer working in New Jersey.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - New York's mayor served notice Friday that his police department would do everything in its power to root out terrorists in the United States, even if that means sending officers outside the city limits or placing law-abiding Muslims under scrutiny. "We just cannot let our guard down again," Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned. He laid out his doctrine for keeping the city safe during his weekly radio show after a week of criticism of a secret New York Police Department effort to monitor mosques in several cities and keep files on Muslim student groups at colleges in Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Upstate New York.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A longtime merchant on the University of Pennsylvania campus has agreed to apologize for poor service after a recent claim of racial discrimination and a scuffle in his store. Stanley Shapiro, founding owner of Campus Copy Center at 39th and Walnut Streets, said he had also agreed to undergo sensitivity training. His apology follows a student-organized meeting attended by representatives of Penn and several student groups and moderated by officials from the city Human Relations Commission.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Yesterday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing religious groups to rent space in public schools has sent Philadelphia School District officials scurrying to find out how they will be affected. According to Harry Tischler, assistant general counsel for the district, the Board of Education is "reviewing the position we're going to take on the ruling. " "We'll either have to allow (religious groups to rent space) or determine what restrictions of a non-religious nature could be placed on certain groups" that are not necessarily religious, Tischler said.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University students streamed back to school by the thousands yesterday, the first day of the spring semester, despite a call for a one-day boycott of classes. The boycott was called by the Temple student government and other student groups to protest the administration's refusal to cancel classes in honor of the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The administration had agreed to consider canceling classes in future years, but not this year. At Temple's main campus on North Broad Street, many students said they disagreed with the administration's decision to hold classes on Dr. King's birthday.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Joseph Yaskin, Special to The Inquirer
A request for permission to form a Bible-study group - advanced by two Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School students in October - was denied unanimously Thursday night by the Colonial school board. The board declined to approve the proposal after board solicitor Francis P. O'Hara said approval would cost the school district its right to deny certain other student groups access to its facilities. The students had sought to meet at the high school during school hours under the supervision of a faculty advisor.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The Glassboro State College Board of Trustees agreed yesterday to allow the formation of a campus chapter of the Ralph Nader-sponsored New Jersey Public Interest Research Group, but rejected an automatic funding system the group had sought. Student organizers for the group, which is active on environmental and public policy issues, wanted permission to charge a 40-cent fee per credit hour on tuition bills, with students having the option of checking a box if they did not wish to belong to NJPIRG.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | by Shantee' Woodards, Daily News Staff Writer
Future entrepreneurs of Philadelphia need your help. After three weeks of learning how to create their own businesses, student groups from the Summer Youth Work Experience will demonstrate their skills by selling products at today's Black Family Reunion at Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park. But they need your money to succeed. "We want to encourage them to learn the skills to start a business and use them positively," said Curtis Jones Jr., president and CEO of the Philadelphia Commercial Development Corp.
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NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania student group called on the school Wednesday to begin donating about $6 million a year to Philadelphia, with the money designated for its cash-starved public schools and other "essential services. " The Student Labor Action Project asked Penn president Amy Gutmann to set aside the money for a payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT). Penn, like other nonprofits, gets a break on property taxes. The $6 million represents a small portion of the property tax it would pay as a for-profit entity.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a brief but poignant gesture, students at the University of Pennsylvania Law School made a silent statement of protest Tuesday over the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. At noon, more than 60 law students, black and white, gathered in the law school's Great Hall and lay on the marble floor for 41/2 minutes of silence in what they described as a "die-in. " The quick, quiet protest was a reference to the 41/2 hours that Brown's body lay on the street on Aug. 9 after he was fatally shot by Officer Darren Wilson.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE FALLOUT from an alleged assault at a Temple University activities fair continued yesterday. Abdel Aziz Jalil, 22, was charged with simple assault and reckless endangerment after he allegedly punched another student during a heated argument Aug. 20, said Tasha Jamerson, a spokeswoman for the District Attorney's Office. The victim - whom law-enforcement sources identified as Daniel Vessal - initially claimed that Jalil had used anti-Semitic slurs during the confrontation. However, Vessal later told the D.A.'s Office that "he does not believe that he was assaulted because of religion, race or ethnicity," said Jamerson, who also noted that witnesses to the incident echoed that belief.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of Temple University assured Jewish students and others Monday that the university was conducting an investigation after a student was allegedly attacked and called anti-Semitic names last week. Neil D. Theobald addressed the issue while answering written questions from students at the Student Center during the school year's first meeting of student government. "There is no place on a university campus for violence," Theobald said when asked what the university was doing to prevent similar incidents and why no one had been arrested.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The stereotypical Curtis Institute of Music professor heroically survived the Russian Revolution and continues teaching proper Tchaikovsky performance while smoking Gauloises at the age of 103. At least in years past. These days, the six members of the cutting-edge Chicago ensemble eighth blackbird are barely distinguishable from the students during their periodic residencies here. Their presence augments the traditional Curtis landscape, yielding concerts of new music that make students do it the hard way: from memory and without a conductor.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Nearly three dozen downtown bars, restaurants, and bottle shops have agreed to halt alcohol sales to counter an early St. Patrick's Day celebration created by Pennsylvania State University students, the most aggressive effort yet to curb drinking for the unofficial "State Patty's Day" holiday. In exchange, each business will receive a $5,000 subsidy to help account for lost revenue. State Patty's Day was created in 2007 to celebrate St. Patrick's Day when it fell during spring break that year.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Miriam Hill and Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Massachusetts authorities reported Saturday night that a Philadelphia-area charter bus carrying 42 passengers struck a bridge overpass in Boston, injuring 34 people. The passengers were high school students and chaperones visiting Harvard University, state police said. Boston Emergency Medical Services reported that one person suffered life-threatening injuried and that three were seriously injured. The students were in Boston with the Destined for a Dream Foundation, NBC 10 reported late Saturday night.
NEWS
September 12, 2012
A Chester County law student has been elected president of the International Law Student Association for the coming school year. Kevin Krauss of West Chester, a student at Widener University Law School, will preside over student-led projects for the Chicago-based organization. The group runs educational programs in areas including international law and comparative legal systems, coordinates 500 student chapters in more than 80 countries, and runs an international moot court competition.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - The state attorney general assured a group of Muslim leaders Wednesday that a New York City police unit that conducted surveillance of Muslim businesses, religious leaders, and student groups was no longer operating in New Jersey. Jeffrey Chiesa made the remarks during the first meeting of an outreach committee he formed to repair relations between law enforcement and Muslims in the wake of revelations about the New York Police Department's surveillance tactics. Paul Loriquet, a spokesman for the attorney general, confirmed that Chiesa said during the closed-door meeting that the NYPD's Demographics Unit was no longer working in New Jersey.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer
This story has been updated. THE YOUNG fifth-grader wanted to show his friend the plastic pellet gun he brought into school earlier this year. The principal, who knew the student had no history of violent outbreaks or suspensions, had no choice but to follow the district's Code of Student Conduct and call the police. Four days' suspension. Now it appears a charter school wants to keep him out because of his record, said David Lapp, staff attorney with the Education Law Center.
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