CollectionsStudent Life
IN THE NEWS

Student Life

NEWS
August 16, 2008 | By Nicole Lister
This is the latest in a series titled "Off Campus," featuring opinion pieces by writers from local colleges and universities. 'I touch the future. I teach.' Those are the words of Christa McAuliffe, educator and astronaut. The weight of these words, and the weight of their truth, are self-evident to teachers across the educational spectrum, from grammar school to grad school. Whether we are still docile students or seasoned adults in the "real" world, we can all recall a teacher who has left an indelible impression on our lives, be it good or bad, and who has shaped who we are today.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
School didn't mean much to Maurice Lindsey. Show your face. Do just enough work to keep teachers off your back. Those were his goals. But that was before a complex change triggered by one simple thing. A person who cared. Now, the quiet young man - once on his way to becoming a dropout - is an accomplished student at Lincoln High School. He is a science whiz, at ease with things like an atomic absorption spectrophotometer and complicated chemical experiments. He is one of 11 Pennsylvania students who this week are participating in an international science symposium in Moscow.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a bitter cold Tuesday morning outside West Philadelphia High School. Bundled in heavy, quilted jackets and leather sneakers, with book bags hugging their shoulders, students climb the school's concrete stairs and file through double doors. I join this bustling stream, wearing a thick, mustard-yellow jacket and toting my own black canvas bag filled with notebooks, pens and paper. This is my first day inside the massive stone building on the corner of 48th and Walnut streets.
NEWS
April 12, 1997
Free-floating anger: It's the worst enemy of middle-school educators. Simply suspending students who act out is no cure for it. The answer, teachers are finding, is to teach conflict-resolution skills. Ask any teacher: The middle-school years are so confusing for hormone-wracked kids (and their parents) that maintaining good order in school is a tough job. How to achieve peace? Nowadays state legislatures, appalled at school violence and discipline breakdowns, seem eager to impose one-size-fits-all solutions such as out-of-school suspensions.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Betsy Blaney, Associated Press
AMARILLO, Texas - A former Texas college student from Saudi Arabia was sentenced to life in prison Tuesday for trying to make a bomb for use in a religious attack, possibly targeting a former U.S. president. Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari was sentenced in Amarillo, where jurors convicted him in June of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction. Prosecutors say he had collected bomb-making material in his apartment and researched possible targets, including the Dallas home of former President George W. Bush.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | by Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
Ahlayshia Holmes. Amire Lowe. Charnae Wise. Raymond Graves. These young Philadelphians all died this year, allegedly at the hands of adult relatives. Though the abuse they suffered is extreme compared to what social workers normally encounter, it is still indicative of the harsh realities that thousands of city preschoolers face day in and day out. According to a new city-commissioned report, an alarmingly large number of young children are exposed to myriad risk factors that keep them from excelling once they begin school.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore H. Welsh, 84, of West Philadelphia, the owner of a South Street barbershop for more than half a century, died Saturday at the Mercy Catholic Medical Center-Misericordia Division. Welsh's Barber Shop, at 1908 South Street, usually smelled of hair tonic. Mr. Welsh, a distinguished-looking man who wore glasses and a white smock, was always ready to discuss world affairs, politics, opera or any other subject that appealed to a customer. He cut hair until two years ago, when he sold his business.
NEWS
January 26, 2006
America has become a "choice" society. Consumers increasingly have to decipher and choose from a throng of competing credit-card offers, 401(k) plans, HMO benefits and the like. But even college graduates may lack the basic skills to make good decisions. The nonprofit American Institutes for Research (AIR) has found a distressing literacy gap among graduating seniors. Surveying 1,827 students at 80 two- and four-year schools in 2003, researchers discovered that only a fraction could handle the most complex tasks, such as comparing interest-rate offers.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They sold wine and cakes for months to get to the United States from France, only to be dazzled by the little things in life: lockers, Gatorade and fake nails, among them. They'll be hitting the obligatory tourist spots in Washington, New York and Philadelphia. But as 22 French students sat in classes last week at Bishop McDevitt High School, they were learning real lessons about what it's like to be an American teenager in suburbia. "When they came home from school, they eat," remarked Nicolas Tourette, 15. "They're always eating.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Ronald C. "Ronny Boy" Owen Jr. felt disrespected by a young man in a City Avenue bar that fatal night in 1993, and waited outside for the man to come out, the prosecutor said. In a parking lot across the street from the Muddy Duck Tavern, Owen dragged David Atlas Jr. out of a car, beat and shot him to death, Assistant District Attorney Richard Carroll told a jury as Owen's murder trial opened yesterday. Atlas, 23, was a second-year medical student at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, finishing up his term and getting ready to go home for Christmas when he was slain early on Dec. 21, 1993.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|