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NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANGHORNE What started as a journalistic exercise at Neshaminy High School may end in a courtroom. A law firm representing student newspaper editors has told school officials that the editors plan to resume their ban on printing the word redskin - and that any attempt to stop them would be unconstitutional. "The students will proceed in accordance with their published policy and, if disciplined for doing so, will take action to defend their rights," said the seven-page letter sent Friday by lawyers at Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
After a year of irregular production and near-dormancy, the Burlington County College student newspaper has been resurrected. Although the paper does not have a faculty adviser, a full staff or even a name, the first issue of the academic year came out Nov. 7. That day, about 2:30 p.m., editor Rob Piekarski - a 23-year-old student from Pennsauken wearing an "American Dreamer" sweatshirt - stood in the paper's dinky office and prepared to...
SPORTS
December 30, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
Penn's student newspaper reported Friday that five Quakers men's basketball players were suspended for a game last week for failing random drug tests. After the 83-60 loss at Delaware on Dec. 21, coach Jerome Allen said the players - Miles Cartwright, Steve Rennard, Tony Hicks, Henry Brooks, and Darien Nelson-Henry - were suspended for violating team rules. The Daily Pennsylvanian, however, citing an anonymous source, said that the players were disciplined for failing drug tests.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1996 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Temple News, Temple University's student newspaper, is plunging headfirst into the world of cyberspace, propelled by many of the same economic forces affecting the newspaper industry as a whole. When students return from spring break, the campus paper will be the campus virtual paper, available online Tuesday through Friday. The paper paper - the one with ink that can be read on the subway or used to swat flies - will appear only twice a week. By the end of the semester, the Temple News, circulation 10,000, will appear in print just once a week - although it should run slightly more than its usual eight pages, perhaps 16. "The cost of newsprint has put us well over budget," said Dawn Williams, Temple News editor, sitting in the typically trashy office of a student newspaper.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Administrators at Villanova University confiscated all copies of the campus' newest student newspaper, the Conservative Column, last week, saying the paper had failed to meet university requirements that it have a faculty adviser. But its editor, Chris Lilik, 20, who proudly calls his biweekly "the conservative, Catholic, Howard Stern of campus political papers" - without the sleaze - said the action was the administration's attempt to shut him up. "All they're trying to do is censor us and tone us down," Lilik, a sophomore from Clarks Summit, Pa., said last week.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Council Rock High School's student newspaper, The Indianite, will hit the stands a little later than expected this month. Principal David Yates said he held the February issue of the paper from release for two days so he could be assured reporters had tried to contact people representing various viewpoints for stories involving the district's buyout of former Superintendent David Blatt. "There didn't seem to be the balance that I would like to have seen," Yates said. After talking with student editors, Yates said he became comfortable with the information printed because he knew the students had sufficiently tried to contact those representing the viewpoint of the district taxpayer association, but could not get a response from them.
NEWS
October 21, 1998 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Neumann College's student newspaper is back in publication after student editors worked out a compromise agreement with administrators who had demanded to review the paper before publication. Student editors agreed Friday to develop a mission statement for the paper and form an advisory board composed of students and faculty but no administrators, said Anne Marie Ketchum, student editorial board member. In exchange, the school dropped its demand for prior review. The advisory board will not have the right to preview the newspaper, Ketchum said.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | By Cindy Anders, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The former top editor of West Chester University's student newspaper is suing the university and seven students accused of holding her and another editor hostage in the paper's offices a year ago. Amy Angelilli, former editor-in-chief of The Quad, is asking for more than $650,000 in damages plus legal fees - $50,000 from each of the 13 defendants, including faculty advisers and the university's public safety department. The lawsuit cites an incident on March 11, 1993, when several students from the Black Student Union (BSU)
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
More than a month after a bitter censorship dispute arose over a column on flatulence, the Hatboro-Horsham Senior High School newspaper staff distributed a new edition yesterday. The 16-page Hat-Chat includes a front-page story with the headline "Black day in journalism. " Inside, three editorials protest acting principal Connie Malatesta's decision Feb. 15 to take all 1,200 copies of the newspaper's last edition and lock them in a safe. The writers also defend teacher Robin Farr, who lost her position as the paper's adviser.
NEWS
April 4, 2006 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Roxborough High School student newspaper won a first-place journalism award in a statewide competition, even though it had the money to publish only one edition last school year. With the paper's future in jeopardy, Cathy Rex, a veteran English teacher and faculty adviser for the Ridge Record, wrote a letter to the judges of the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association contest, lamenting the school's predicament. "You are receiving entries from what may be our final issue, published last spring," she told the judges.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Even colleges with endowments as large as Haverford's are not immune to the financial challenges hitting universities across the country. Haverford's board of managers this month approved a plan to set an annual cap on the college's mushrooming financial aid budget and increase the size of the freshman class by seven students a year for five years in an effort to balance the budget. The plan has proved controversial because it includes modifying the college's long-held policy of admitting students regardless of ability to pay and giving them enough financial aid to attend.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The week before her column was to appear in the student newspaper at Pennsylvania State University, Caroline Crasnick warned her parents: "Be prepared. " The 20-year-old media-studies major from Langhorne was about to lay bare for the University Park campus - and the Internet world - her battle with mental illness. She described being "curled up on the cold linoleum" floor of her State College apartment one autumn evening her sophomore year and thinking: "The world would be better off if I were dead.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elaine Catherine Pierson Mastroianni, 89, of Bryn Mawr, a physician and the author of Sex Is Never an Emergency , a sexual-health guide for young adults, died Saturday, Oct. 3, of lung cancer at home. Dr. Pierson's slim paperback appeared on campuses a decade before Dr. Ruth Westheimer suggested a frank approach to human sexuality, and three years before Our Bodies, Ourselves , a landmark book on sex, was released. "My primary objective of this little book is to prevent unwanted pregnancies and, secondarily, to help students be more comfortable with their level of sexuality, whatever that level is," she wrote.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the University of Pennsylvania's efforts to educate students about sexual assault, a majority of students surveyed recently said they did not know where to find help on campus if they or a friend became a victim. Penn president Amy Gutmann called that finding and others highlighted in a national survey on sexual assault at some of the nation's most elite colleges "deeply troubling. " "We clearly must do more, beginning immediately, to make all students aware that they have immediate recourse for help," Gutmann said in an email to the Penn community shortly after the national results were released.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Student leaders and parents of students who committed suicide at the University of Pennsylvania are pressing the Ivy League school to do more to address mental health needs - an issue that has been mounting on the campus since the high profile death of a promising scholar athlete last year. "In the past two years, seven Penn students have died by suicide," the group wrote in a letter to Penn president Amy Gutmann earlier this month. "Unfortunately, the university has not taken decisive action to make sure this doesn't happen to current and future students.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Dan Reimold, a journalism professor at St. Joseph's University who founded the influential blog College Media Matters, died unexpectedly this week. Hours after the school announced his death Friday, tributes to Reimold, 34, were growing on nearly every media-industry blog in the country - Poynter.org, Nieman Journalism Lab, MediaShift, the Associated Collegiate Press, and others. "He was undisputedly the foremost scholar on college media today," College Media Association president Rachele Kanigel said in an article.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
LAST WEEK IT was announced that Shonda Rhimes, the award-winning creator of "Grey's Anatomy" and "Scandal" is releasing a book called Year of Yes . Apparently Rhimes was inspired to write it after she was dared in December 2013 to say yes to unexpected invitations for one year. I've always thought saying yes too often is right up there with smiling too much, being too friendly and trying too hard. But sometime around New Year's Eve last year, I was similarly inspired.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The phrase Rape Haven was painted on the front of a Swarthmore College fraternity house this week, and college officials said they were investigating. The vandalism at Delta Upsilon was discovered Tuesday morning, less than two weeks after a member of the fraternity wrote an opinion piece for the student newspaper, the Phoenix, touting the house's positive contributions. In the aftermath of "deplorable behavior" at a University of Oklahoma fraternity in which members were caught chanting racial slurs in a video, Nathaniel Frum wrote, Swarthmore "can take pride" that Delta Upsilon "has set a model that should be followed.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE REV. EDMUND Dobbin always said his first love was teaching. So it had to have been something of a relief when Dobbin left the presidency of Villanova University at the end of the 2005-06 academic year after 18 years. Sure, he said, he loved it, but being an administrator is a far cry from the hands-on experience of the classroom, the shaping of young minds, the interaction with students hanging on your every word - at least in theory. "Teaching was always my first love," he said on leaving the presidency and stepping into a classroom at the Main Line university he served for so long.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James "Jim" Moffatt, 80, of Riverton, N.J., a longtime Inquirer copy editor and much-beloved journalism professor at Rutgers University, died Sunday, Oct. 26, at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, Camden. A close friend said he had battled diabetes and heart problems for many years. Mr. Moffatt retired in January 1997 after more than three decades as a copy editor and slot at The Inquirer, initially for news and later for business copy under a newsroom reorganization. The last to get the story in The Inquirer's editing lineup, the slot's job is to vet the work of other copy editors and make sure mistakes are corrected before the story is released for publication.
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