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Student Teaching

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NEWS
April 6, 1993 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers senior Kim Nichols - for so many years a student - is almost ready to re-enter the classroom as a teacher. There's just one final step: a semester of student teaching. Last week, Nichols learned she might not be able to take that step. According to a letter sent last Tuesday to the education students at Rutgers' Camden campus, recent budget cuts mean the school can't hire enough people to supervise the student teachers. "The number of students the department can support in student teaching will be severely curtailed," said the letter from Roberta Devlin-Scherer, education department chairwoman.
NEWS
April 8, 2007 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One is a vice principal in charge of discipline. Three teach special education. One is a guidance counselor, another a physical education teacher. These six educators have something more in common than their profession. They all also happen to be DJs. There's Ron Strauss, a vice principal at Highland Regional High School. Jonathan Strout is a guidance counselor at Cherry Hill East. Joe Smith teaches special education at Toms River South after spending 12 years at Delsea Regional High School.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whenever A. Glenn McClure glanced at the tiny black elephant statue in his office at Valley Forge Christian College, he'd say a little prayer for Jessica Buchanan. He knew his former student, now an aid worker in Somalia, had been held captive by pirates there since October. Buchanan graduated in 2007 from Valley Forge Christian, where McClure heads the education department. The elephant, he said, was "her way of saying thank you" for his help in setting up a student teaching gig for her in Africa that would help cement her enduring commitment to that continent.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Appel sat with a cup of coffee, a textbook and some notes in the teachers' lounge at the Penn Wood East Middle School in Yeadon. In a few minutes, he would be standing in front of about 25 students, mostly 14- and 15-year-olds, in what he feared might be a vain attempt to interest them in Romeo and Juliet. It would be the first time he would stand before a public school class as a teacher. Two years ago, he taught English to Spanish-speaking students at a private school in Los Angeles, but that, he said, was different.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the old good news, bad news routine. The good: Most of the 56 education students at Rutgers University's Camden campus who expect to student-teach next school year probably will get to do so after all. The bad: There's no such guarantee for the students who come after them. In fact, finances might force the campus to cut back on its education program. "I can honestly say the education department in Camden is the most underfunded education department I've ever seen," said Robert Catlin, dean of arts and sciences.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Keri Snedden, who teaches multiply handicapped youngsters at the Burlington County Special Services School District, has added another job title: adjunct professor at Trenton State College. The title is unofficial, but under an agreement with the state college and the school district, Snedden is teaching a new generation of teachers, as well as their professors. Under the program, Trenton State not only sends its seniors to the Burlington County facility for student teaching and its underclassmen to observe activities, but also sends its faculty, to lead teacher-training workshops.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For nine years, she worked for IBM. Her second full-time job - raising two children - also lasted nine years. Now 40, Joanne Springrose has embarked on a third career - teaching. "Once my youngest was in first grade, in 1991, I decided to go back to college," Springrose said. "I needed to do something with my time. My family is very important to me, and I wanted to do something that still gave me vacations with them. " So Springrose, a graduate of Purdue University in 1975 with a degree in interior design, decided to pursue the one career that would put her schedule in sync with her children: teaching.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Rosemary B. Smith Fesi, 45, who decided later in life to become a kindergarten teacher, died Monday at her Collegeville home after a year-long battle with ovarian cancer. After many years as a homemaker, Mrs. Fesi went back to school and in 1989 earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from West Chester University. In 1994, she earned a master's degree in education from the same school. She completed her student teaching at Arrowhead Elementary School in the Methacton School District.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emily Spencer Shook, 69, of Ardmore, an educator who taught disabled children for 42 years, died of a heart attack Jan. 14 at home. Mrs. Shook earned a bachelor's degree, with a dual major in elementary and special education, from Pennsylvania State University and completed her student teaching at Widener Memorial School in Philadelphia. After graduating in 1962, she returned to Widener, a public school for children with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and other neuromuscular diseases and disabilities.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whenever A. Glenn McClure glanced at the tiny black elephant statue in his office at Valley Forge Christian College, he'd say a little prayer for Jessica Buchanan. He knew his former student, now an aid worker in Somalia, had been held captive by pirates there since October. Buchanan graduated in 2007 from Valley Forge Christian, where McClure heads the education department. The elephant, he said, was "her way of saying thank you" for his help in setting up a student teaching gig for her in Africa that would help cement her enduring commitment to that continent.
NEWS
June 24, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
        MELISSA SCHWARTZ, Jenn Metzger, Casey Ostaszewski-Edwards and Tim Marren jokingly refer to themselves as "the three musketeers and the mule they rode in on. " Casey and Tim, best buddies since kindergarten at Lawton Elementary School, started hanging out with Melissa and Jenn when they were all sophomores at Central High. They shared Jenn's roomy, centrally located locker. Goofed their way through science lab and summer weeks in Wildwood, where they were loud enough to disturb even the partyers.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emily Spencer Shook, 69, of Ardmore, an educator who taught disabled children for 42 years, died of a heart attack Jan. 14 at home. Mrs. Shook earned a bachelor's degree, with a dual major in elementary and special education, from Pennsylvania State University and completed her student teaching at Widener Memorial School in Philadelphia. After graduating in 1962, she returned to Widener, a public school for children with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and other neuromuscular diseases and disabilities.
NEWS
April 3, 2009 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Maria Eugenia Gama Olivan immigrated to the United States 10 years ago, language separated her from her profession. She was a nurse in Mexico. Now she cleans dorm rooms at Ursinus College. Gama Olivan was just the kind of person a group of students on the Collegeville campus had in mind when deciding to help others chip away at a wall. "English is power," Ursinus senior Carolina Contreras said. "Being able to share it means a lot. " So the students, mostly Latino and human-rights activists, started a class that puts a twist on the classic student-teacher paradigm.
NEWS
April 8, 2007 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One is a vice principal in charge of discipline. Three teach special education. One is a guidance counselor, another a physical education teacher. These six educators have something more in common than their profession. They all also happen to be DJs. There's Ron Strauss, a vice principal at Highland Regional High School. Jonathan Strout is a guidance counselor at Cherry Hill East. Joe Smith teaches special education at Toms River South after spending 12 years at Delsea Regional High School.
NEWS
April 21, 2006 | By Keith Howell
I have taught social studies and science for 11 years at U.S. Wiggins School in Camden. During those years, I have seen a committed principal, a dedicated staff and parents work together to prepare poor black and Latino students for success. It is racist to say, as a March 3 Inquirer article quoting "experts" did, that high test scores at our elementary school and some other city schools "are statistically unexpected" given the poverty in Camden. Such statements are a smack in the face of Mary McLeod Bethune, the black educator who built a school at the beginning of the last century for poor black students; Marva Collins, the Chicago educator who raised test scores in a poor black urban community; Joe Clark, who raised test scores in a poor black and Latino community in Paterson, N.J., and was the subject of the movie Lean on Me; and Jaime Escalante, who raised math scores in a poor East Los Angeles Latino community and was the subject of the movie Stand and Deliver.
NEWS
August 14, 2005 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ed Pietrzak wants to be an elementary school teacher, providing just a touch of magic in the classroom. The 21-year-old Camden County College graduate, who plans to become an elementary education major at St. Joseph's University later this month, has been a performing magician since he was 10. "I want to use the magic in the classroom to create a unique learning environment," the Pennsauken resident said. "When it seems life is against you, there's something about magic that demonstrates that anything is possible.
NEWS
June 1, 2005 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jessica McKelvey spent much of her childhood in a small, southern Pennsylvania town where her friends and neighbors were white, where holiday parades down Main Street were led by the high school marching band, and where the Loyal Order of Moose Lodge ran basket bingo nights. "Real country," she said. So inner-city Philadelphia was not high on her list of places to pursue a teaching career until her adviser at Indiana University of Pennsylvania suggested it. Now, the 23-year-old can't imagine teaching any place other than Moffet Elementary, a feisty little school surrounded by worn-down factories and vacant lots in Kensington.
NEWS
March 10, 2004 | By DAVIN SAFER & RACHEL MAUSNER
"One of my teachers in eighth grade, the students felt that she was a nice person, she knew and cared about the subject matter, but her teaching methods were boring . . . [so] the kids didn't learn very well. So we compiled a list of 15-20 suggestions of things she could do to make the class more interesting. When she read the list, she thanked us and said that she would try to incorporate the suggestions into her teaching. After that the class got more interesting . . . and the class as a whole was learning better.
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