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TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, Maine - The studio where painter Winslow Homer derived inspiration on Maine's craggy coast and produced some of his most notable seascapes isn't heated with wood or illuminated by oil lamps as it was in Homer's day. But in most other ways, the studio has now been restored to what it was like when Homer lived there, from 1883 until his death in 1910, following a multiyear, $2.8 million restoration by the Portland Museum of Art. ...
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
After 23 years of calming crying babies, settling itchy kids and cajoling nervous adults to smile in his Drexel Hill portrait studio, Rich Pruett has moved his operation to Springfield, where he continues to calm babies, settle kids and cajole adults. The setting may change, but the business remains the same. A photographer - no matter where he works - "has to be a psychologist," Pruett said. Since last month, Pruett, 48, has been practicing his way with people in a renovated Tudor stone house at State and Sproul Roads.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A photographer's plan to use a house on Kromer Avenue in Berwyn as his studio was opposed by several neighbors at a hearing this week before the Tredyffrin Township Zoning Hearing Board. The photographer, Paul Emma, who lives in Devon, was seeking a variance from the residential zoning of the vacant twin house in the 600 block of Kromer that he owns. The zoning board heard testimony on the case Monday. Because of an error in advertising the hearing, the board will reopen the case at its Jan. 22 meeting.
LIVING
June 26, 2009 | By Paul Jablow FOR THE INQUIRER
It's not that the art of glassblowing doesn't get any respect. It's just that it never hurts to remind people that even if it's a bowl or an ashtray, it's still art. This explains why Emily Kimelman Gilvey and her husband, Sean, had planned to turn their Hudson Beach Glass studio into a small gallery ever since it opened in October. They wanted to show paintings and photography as well as exhibit their own line of glassware and others. "We're a small, family business that's making something," said Gilvey, a photographer turned mystery writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011
SIGMA SOUND Studios' chief engineer and former co-owner Joe Tarsia remembers Billy Joel's radio concert debut being quite the event. Tarsia had been behind the board for a bunch of the record label-sponsored, "WMMR @ Sigma" shows, a series he recalls as "the first of its kind in the nation" and "a great way to promote a new act. " The series also brought wider attention to Sigma, then noted primarily as home to the sophisti-soul Philadelphia International...
LIVING
September 6, 1987 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
The word studio conjures up images of large spaces, sophisticated lighting and ideal photographic conditions. But a studio is simply a place where a photographer can master light and background, while having some control over technique. The amount of space can vary, as long as there is enough for the photographer, the subject and the equipment. Good sunlight can be helpful but isn't essential. A studio can be permanent or temporary, but the key ingredient is creativity. Many of the spectacular shots appearing in magazines were created in plain and even shabby surroundings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1998 | By Phyllis Furman, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
It all comes down to a pig. Seagram chief Edgar Bronfman Jr. is banking on Babe: Pig in the City, the sequel to the 1995 hit Babe, and three other fourth-quarter films to drag his Hollywood studio out of a long, painful slump. The year has been a disaster for Universal Pictures, the film division of liquor and entertainment giant Seagram. Thanks to flops ranging from BASEketball to Primary Colors, Universal has fallen behind every major Hollywood player but MGM, with a paltry 4.1 percent market share, according to box-office tracking firm Exhibitor Relations.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
A week ago, the Woodland Avenue Medical Clinic celebrated the grand opening of "Studio 55," a special teen clinic at the medical center in Southwest Philadelphia. About 200 teen-agers showed up for a tour of the facilities, on Woodland Avenue near 55th Street, where they can learn about venereal disease and drug abuse or get free pregnancy tests and contraceptives. The clinic, through a prenatal program for pregnant students at nearby John Bartram High School, has established a link to other students at the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
With the release of Troll, Terrorvision and Eliminators this year, Charles Band and his Empire Entertainment mini-studio have made up in quantity what his films demonstrably lack in quality. Band makes no apologies for living in the basement of the movie world with straightforward exploitation films that have global prospects. He is a director (Metalstorm, Parasite) who has turned into a very successful studio executive and who invites obvious comparison with Roger Corman. In the '60s, Corman made his name and a great deal of money by hiring new directing talent cheaply.
NEWS
May 18, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
In terms of quality, one of the most successful of the theatrical ventures launched in Philadelphia in the last few years is the Walnut Street Theater Company's studio theater program. In its first two seasons, this second-stage experiment has given us four productions of exceptional character. Nasty Little Secrets, Lanie Robertson's imaginative treatment of the life and death of playwright Joe Orton, recently closed the second season to sellout audiences. The Normal Heart, Larry Kramer's passionate protest about the AIDS crisis, sold out earlier this season and will resume its timely run on June 14 after two days of previews.
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NEWS
May 29, 2015 | BY ALLIE VOLPE, philly.com AVolpe@philly.com
IT'S A SUNNY Friday. Producer and composer RJD2 (real name, Ramble Jon Krohn) is in the midst of packing up. He's leaving Philadelphia, the city he's called home for over a decade, and moving back to his native Ohio. He and his wife have a young son and he wants him to grow up around family. It's bittersweet for the acclaimed musician, notable for composing "A Beautiful Mine," the opening-credit theme for the recently wrapped AMC series "Mad Men. " The move comes on the heels of the May 5 release of "STS x RJD2," his collaborative album with Atlanta-bred, Philly-based rapper STS (a/k/a Sugar Tongue Slim; born Doncarlos Price)
SPORTS
May 7, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
WITH "Avengers: Age Of Ultron" crushing everything in its path and obliterating box-office records along the way, the question, as always, is: "What does the future of the Marvel cinematic universe have in store?" Thankfully, Comics Guy was able to chat with Marvel Studios head honcho Kevin Feige to get some answers! (Warning: Mild spoilers if you haven't seen "Ultron" yet!) In the wake of the premiere screening of "Age of Ultron," Feige was already excitedly talking about the next film on Marvel's slate.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
With "Avengers: Age of Ultron" projected to do at least $200 million domestically - after opening to over $200 million overseas last weekend - it is clear that Marvel Studios remains hotter than ever, years after some movie pundits declared the comic-book movie craze over. "We are under incredibly crushing expectations," Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige said in an exclusive interview. Indeed, it says something that if "Avengers: Age of Ultron" does "only" $500 million domestically and $1.3 billion worldwide, it would be considered something of a disappointment.
FOOD
April 17, 2015 | By Victoria Mier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything in Laurel restaurant is chosen with precise care by chef and owner Nick Elmi. The wall sconces, of mottled brown iron and imperfect glass, were made by sous chef Eddie Konrad. Elmi built each piece of the rustic furniture and painted all the walls a creamy almond. One of the servers provides the fresh flowers that adorn each table. While the porcelain dinner plates weren't made by the staff, they were made especially for the Passyunk Avenue restaurant to Elmi's exacting specifications by a local ceramics studio, Felt+Fat . There's something about knowing the wares were made "just for us," Elmi said, turning a plate over and running his fingers across the Laurel engraved in the porcelain.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In March, Sigma Sound Studios was approved by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission for a historical marker. The North 12th Street studio is one of the birthplaces of The Sound of Philadelphia, and it's where pop classics such as David Bowie's "Young Americans" and Elton John's "Philadelphia Freedom" were recorded. That building recently was bought for $1.55 million for, of course, new apartments and condos. Famed recording engineer Joe Tarsia opened Sigma in 1968 and sold it in 2003 (to contractor Mario Santoro)
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILLVILLE, N.J. - There is a cycle of inevitability in nature - of birth, growth, evolution, and, eventually, death - that hasn't escaped the eye of Pat Witt. Renowned for capturing the beauty of the changing seasons in the swampy bogs of South Jersey, Witt, 88, is beloved for teaching four generations of children and adults to look deep beyond the mechanics of painting and drawing. Thousands of students have passed through the doors of her Barn Studio of Art since she opened it in 1962, a place that has been called a sanctuary for creativity on the bottom floor of a converted hay barn and florist shop in a wooded glen off Whitaker Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Brion Shreffler, For The Inquirer
The DIY music scene is thriving in Philadelphia. And the do-it-yourself ethos extends to how emerging bands get their music recorded. Take PUDH, a former DIY venue/house in Lansdowne, whose basement seems better suited for an Evil Dead remake than a makeshift recording studio. Members of the band Snoozer now call its basement home. Vocalist and guitarist Tom Kelly, who lives there with his two bandmates, says he has recorded demos for his band there. "We put the mics in the ventilation ducts," he said.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
ONE DAY in 1991, when Byron Walker-Bey was 11, he went to Strawberry Mansion Middle School with a paring knife in his pocket. Now 36, he can't remember why. "It was a knife you peel apples with," Walker-Bey said with the smiling openness that is his trademark. "I wasn't bringing it there to harm anybody. " The knife fell out of his pocket. He was ordered to perform community service. His ceramics teacher steered him to the Clay Studio in Old City. "I was a kid around grown-ups whose lives were dedicated to art," said Walker-Bey, who works as a security guard.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It all seems normal and matter-of-fact to Jamie Wyeth. He enters his grandfather's old studio, a National Historic Landmark owned and operated by the Brandywine River Museum, and there is the familiar birch bark canoe suspended from the ceiling, high in the barnlike space. There is the stuffed river otter, as fierce as ever; there, the model schooner; there, the carved bull's head, the horse head, the old camera, calipers, brushes, palette. And on an easel, left exactly as it was when N.C. Wyeth died in 1945, is an unfinished portrait of George Washington on horseback.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 25 or so people squeezed into a small television studio deep inside the Tredyffrin Township municipal building were told to relax, to accept not being ready for prime time. "The worst problem I have is, people beat themselves up because they're not Steven Spielberg," Gene Donahue, studio manager and a township employee, said to his class of aspiring producers. "Well, guess what? Steven Spielberg wasn't always Steven Spielberg. " Most students don't have experience shooting with a professional camera.
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