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TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, Maine - The studio where painter Winslow Homer derived inspiration on Maine's craggy coast and produced some of his most notable seascapes isn't heated with wood or illuminated by oil lamps as it was in Homer's day. But in most other ways, the studio has now been restored to what it was like when Homer lived there, from 1883 until his death in 1910, following a multiyear, $2.8 million restoration by the Portland Museum of Art. ...
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Thirteen years ago, arthritis began creeping into Jeffry Lohr's spine, bit by bit stiffening it until he was unable to bend over. That would be a life-changer for anyone, but for a master woodworker, it augured the end of the art and craft that had defined him and brought him national renown. The disease progressed to the point that if a nail tumbled from his worktable, he could not pick it up. If there was any saving grace, it was that his hands were spared. So, with medication to keep the pain at bay, the 63-year-old Limerick craftsman has continued creating the traditional furniture that is his signature, as well as free-form pieces that incorporate a tree's edges.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
After 23 years of calming crying babies, settling itchy kids and cajoling nervous adults to smile in his Drexel Hill portrait studio, Rich Pruett has moved his operation to Springfield, where he continues to calm babies, settle kids and cajole adults. The setting may change, but the business remains the same. A photographer - no matter where he works - "has to be a psychologist," Pruett said. Since last month, Pruett, 48, has been practicing his way with people in a renovated Tudor stone house at State and Sproul Roads.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A photographer's plan to use a house on Kromer Avenue in Berwyn as his studio was opposed by several neighbors at a hearing this week before the Tredyffrin Township Zoning Hearing Board. The photographer, Paul Emma, who lives in Devon, was seeking a variance from the residential zoning of the vacant twin house in the 600 block of Kromer that he owns. The zoning board heard testimony on the case Monday. Because of an error in advertising the hearing, the board will reopen the case at its Jan. 22 meeting.
LIVING
June 26, 2009 | By Paul Jablow FOR THE INQUIRER
It's not that the art of glassblowing doesn't get any respect. It's just that it never hurts to remind people that even if it's a bowl or an ashtray, it's still art. This explains why Emily Kimelman Gilvey and her husband, Sean, had planned to turn their Hudson Beach Glass studio into a small gallery ever since it opened in October. They wanted to show paintings and photography as well as exhibit their own line of glassware and others. "We're a small, family business that's making something," said Gilvey, a photographer turned mystery writer.
LIVING
September 6, 1987 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
The word studio conjures up images of large spaces, sophisticated lighting and ideal photographic conditions. But a studio is simply a place where a photographer can master light and background, while having some control over technique. The amount of space can vary, as long as there is enough for the photographer, the subject and the equipment. Good sunlight can be helpful but isn't essential. A studio can be permanent or temporary, but the key ingredient is creativity. Many of the spectacular shots appearing in magazines were created in plain and even shabby surroundings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1998 | By Phyllis Furman, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
It all comes down to a pig. Seagram chief Edgar Bronfman Jr. is banking on Babe: Pig in the City, the sequel to the 1995 hit Babe, and three other fourth-quarter films to drag his Hollywood studio out of a long, painful slump. The year has been a disaster for Universal Pictures, the film division of liquor and entertainment giant Seagram. Thanks to flops ranging from BASEketball to Primary Colors, Universal has fallen behind every major Hollywood player but MGM, with a paltry 4.1 percent market share, according to box-office tracking firm Exhibitor Relations.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
A week ago, the Woodland Avenue Medical Clinic celebrated the grand opening of "Studio 55," a special teen clinic at the medical center in Southwest Philadelphia. About 200 teen-agers showed up for a tour of the facilities, on Woodland Avenue near 55th Street, where they can learn about venereal disease and drug abuse or get free pregnancy tests and contraceptives. The clinic, through a prenatal program for pregnant students at nearby John Bartram High School, has established a link to other students at the school.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | BY PAIGE GROSS, Daily News Staff Writer grossp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
WHEN THE NORTH Philly-based design studio, Creative Tech Works, scouted spaces to host its fashion-meets-tech event, it had one very specific requirement: drones permitted. Today the group's students, who range from elementary school to college, will host their event, Fashion Hack, from 2 to 6 p.m. at Temple University's College of Engineering, on 12th Street near Norris in North Philadelphia. Zuliesuivie Ball, the studio's head of communication development, said the group focuses on finding talent and giving students the ability to go out into the world with knowledge of STEM - science, technology, engineering and math.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
With the release of Troll, Terrorvision and Eliminators this year, Charles Band and his Empire Entertainment mini-studio have made up in quantity what his films demonstrably lack in quality. Band makes no apologies for living in the basement of the movie world with straightforward exploitation films that have global prospects. He is a director (Metalstorm, Parasite) who has turned into a very successful studio executive and who invites obvious comparison with Roger Corman. In the '60s, Corman made his name and a great deal of money by hiring new directing talent cheaply.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Thirteen years ago, arthritis began creeping into Jeffry Lohr's spine, bit by bit stiffening it until he was unable to bend over. That would be a life-changer for anyone, but for a master woodworker, it augured the end of the art and craft that had defined him and brought him national renown. The disease progressed to the point that if a nail tumbled from his worktable, he could not pick it up. If there was any saving grace, it was that his hands were spared. So, with medication to keep the pain at bay, the 63-year-old Limerick craftsman has continued creating the traditional furniture that is his signature, as well as free-form pieces that incorporate a tree's edges.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Danielle Williams has the eye of a tigress. A regular at a CKO Kickboxing studio in North Brunswick, N.J., and one that opened just over a year ago in Yardley, Pa., she's lost 40 pounds punching a bag. "I come here after work to de-stress," said the 32-year-old college financial-aid adviser from Florence, N.J. Williams has lots of muscle-flexing company. Mini-fitness centers, such as CKO (Club Knock Out), SoulCycle, and Orange Theory, among others, are popping up throughout the suburbs and often at your local shopping center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Students unfurling their mats before a recent class at Studio 34 Yoga in West Philadelphia paused for a minute, puzzling over a bowl filled with glossy yellow cards. "I think you're supposed to take one if you want a hands-on adjustment?" someone suggested. A few people tentatively selected cards, as if awaiting a magic trick. Then the teacher arrived, with an explanation: They're "consent cards. " Place one by your mat if you're open to physical guidance from the yoga instructor.
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
'What do you see?" That question drives John Logan's play Red , a two-hander depicting a few years in the life of 20th-century abstract American artist Mark Rothko (David Volin) as he struggles to complete a series of paintings for a prestigious commission. The Walnut Street Theatre's engaging and balanced production invites no easy answers, and a pair of assured performances engage the audience, while testing their preconceptions, their knowledge, and, dare I say, their pretensions.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
It is the real-life portrait of a North Philadelphia family filmed over nearly a decade. The small, everyday moments - and the stakes and drama attached to them. A father working a job delivering circulars in the North Philly dawn. Or being hassled by police outside his home. A conversation between a mother and daughter, as she braids her child's hair. A daughter pressing for a later curfew. It's a family shown in all its complexity and beauty and playfulness - and it's a look into the crushing realities that threaten each of them.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruth Esherick Bascom, 93, the daughter of wood sculptor Wharton Esherick, who worked to preserve his legacy, died Friday, Oct. 23, of congestive heart failure at Paoli Hospital. Mrs. Bascom was born at the family's home on Diamond Rock Hill in Paoli. She was one of three children of Esherick, a painter turned sculptor and wood crafter. As a girl, she was active with the Hedgerow Theatre in Rose Valley, first appearing on stage at age 9 in A.A. Milne's Make Believe and apprenticing at the theater during her senior year at Radnor High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Celeb roller coaster Universal Studios Orlando will open a 3D Jimmy Fallon -theme ride in 2017. It will be called Race Through New York Starring Jimmy Fallon. On his show, the NBC late-night host failed to contain his excitement: "I mean, this is the real deal! It's scary. It's exciting. It's fun. Do you know the Harry Potter rides and all that stuff? It's like that, except instead of Harry Potter, it's me, and instead of Hogwarts, it's New York City. " But can it ever hope to equal Mr. Toad's Wild Ride?
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | BY PAIGE GROSS, Daily News Staff Writer grossp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
WHEN THE NORTH Philly-based design studio, Creative Tech Works, scouted spaces to host its fashion-meets-tech event, it had one very specific requirement: drones permitted. Today the group's students, who range from elementary school to college, will host their event, Fashion Hack, from 2 to 6 p.m. at Temple University's College of Engineering, on 12th Street near Norris in North Philadelphia. Zuliesuivie Ball, the studio's head of communication development, said the group focuses on finding talent and giving students the ability to go out into the world with knowledge of STEM - science, technology, engineering and math.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
Judd on the offense In a talk with  Variety ,  Ashley Judd  said she was once sexually harassed by a famous (but unnamed) Hollywood studio executive. Judd said the harassment occurred in 1997, when she was shooting "Kiss the Girls. " She said the exec "physically lured" her to his hotel room and made various requests, which she declined. When she was asked to watch him shower, she was able to get the heck outta there. Judd said she later found out that the exec had done the same thing to other actresses.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moving trucks were triple-parked outside 915 Spring Garden St. in the rain Thursday morning as artists - some of whom had kept studios in the old Reading Railroad building for 30 years - wrapped sculptures, boxed paintings, and wrangled with file cabinets. The city Department of Licenses and Inspections had evacuated the building after a small fire broke out Sept. 2 in one of the nearly 100 studios. Though it was quickly extinguished, subsequent inspections by L&I and the Fire Department yielded 29 violations that landlord Pintzuk Brown Realty Group of Jenkintown will have to resolve before tenants can get back to work.
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