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Studio

NEWS
January 29, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Robert C. Froehlich, 78, of Buckingham Township, who operated a photography studio for many years and was prominent in Masonic activities, died Wednesday of cancer-related problems at Warminster Hospital. Mr. Froehlich was a chemical operator for several years at Merck & Co.'s Merck Sharp & Dohme Division in West Point, then spent 13 years as a cameraman for WCAU-TV in the 1950s and early '60s. From 1958 until his 1994 retirement, he owned and operated a photography studio bearing his name in Doylestown Township.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011
SIGMA SOUND Studios' chief engineer and former co-owner Joe Tarsia remembers Billy Joel's radio concert debut being quite the event. Tarsia had been behind the board for a bunch of the record label-sponsored, "WMMR @ Sigma" shows, a series he recalls as "the first of its kind in the nation" and "a great way to promote a new act. " The series also brought wider attention to Sigma, then noted primarily as home to the sophisti-soul Philadelphia International...
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
A log cabin, newly built on a bank of Brandywine Creek, is wildlife artist Tony Obara's studio - and his handiwork. "This log cabin really reflects the person I am," said Obara, 42, who regards himself an artist, a hunter, a conservationist. "I have put a lot of myself into designing this studio. " If ever there were a studio for a wildlife artist, his log cabin is it. Zebra and bearskin rugs lay stretched across hardwood floors. On one wall are other treasures from African safaris - the mounted heads of a wildebeest and an impala; on another arches the torso of a 159-pound Atlantic salmon that took the Unionville artist almost two hours to reel in. Elk and deer antlers have been crafted into chandeliers, for the cabin and his residence.
NEWS
May 29, 1998 | by Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News
They said disco died, but nobody put it in writing. This summer at the movies we get Studio 54 redux and redux again. Two movies, "The Last Days of Disco," and "54," get us past the doorman. Our moment has finally come, and it only took 20 years. Director Whit Stillman doesn't call the club in "The Last Days of Disco" Studio 54, but it is - though he means also to evoke other "velvet rope" venues like Xenon and El Morocco. Still, the infamous Studio 54 bust - in which scads of cash were found below stairs, and co-owners Ian Schrager and the late Steve Rubell went to jail - is a pivotal plot point in "Disco," which hits theaters today.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
A musician is a musician is a musician. That's what a Fort Dix recording studio believes - with or without drumsticks, a drummer's soul remains intact, poised to beat a cadence. The studio gives musicians, serious and otherwise, the opportunity to borrow instruments or to use their own to record both harmony and melody with eight-track professional recording equipment. The studio, at the Music & Theater Branch at Pointville Community Center on Pointville Road, is open to the public as well as to the military personnel on the base.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
For most of this century, one of the marks of being rich and famous in Philadelphia was to have had your photograph taken by Bachrach. But a tradition that began here in 1915 is ending. Bachrach said yesterday it is closing its studio at 1611 Walnut St., along with studios in Chicago and San Francisco. Five studios will remain - Boston; Alexandria, Va., New York City, and two suburban New York locations, Morristown, N.J., and Greenwich, Ct. Why? "Because of terrible business conditions," says Louis "Chip" Bachrach, a fourth-generation descendant of the company's founder, and current chairman of the board.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORRISTOWN – What started as a klieg-lit dream to put a movie studio in Norristown ended Wednesday with the old Logan Square Shopping Center being bought at a sheriff's auction by its main investor. Now that the foreclosure suit that spurred the sheriff's sale is over, Montgomery County officials can pursue "whatever remedies are open" to the county to recoup some of the $24.5 million in public funds it put into the project, said the county's chief financial officer, Uri Z. Monson.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The budgets for this summer's big action-adventures have rocketed into the stratosphere. And while their price tags vary, the number that keeps coming up is 22 - as in Catch-22. Nervous studio chiefs, pondering bottom lines that look like the tab for a savings-and-loan bailout, would love to find a way to keep talent costs down. But they need the marquee magnetism of stars on a first-name basis with the moviegoing public. And the cost of insurance called "Arnold," "Tom" or "Sly" can be staggering.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Walk through the entrance of Studio 4, and it's the first thing you see. Up on the wall, enshrined under glass, are gold and platinum records of the Hooters' Nervous Night album. Even more intriguing is the space on the wall next to them: It's already reserved for the gold record of One Way Home, the Hooters' latest release. The Hooters, who have been recording at the studio at 444 N. Third St. since their early days, dedicated these symbols of success to the studio as a kind of thank-you.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Inspired by the natural world that surrounded his studio in the woods, Wharton Esherick transformed wood into fluid sculpture and shapely furniture that merged utility with beauty. Over the years, his studio - a building that defies conventional architecture - became a showcase for his art, from the spiral staircase that was displayed at the 1939-40 World's Fair in New York to his first red oak desk, right down to the carved latches on the doors. When Esherick, known as the dean of American craftsmen, died in 1970, he left this legacy.
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