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NEWS
September 11, 2014
C ARL WHITE, 46, of Bristol Borough, is CEO of Think Brownstone, an experience design firm he co-founded in 2007 with Brian McIntire, 38, of Downingtown. The Conshohocken firm opened an office in July on 15th Street near Sansom, in Center City. Fifteen of the firm's 50 employees relocated there. Q: Why'd you decide to put an office in Center City? A: We needed new space to attract talent as well as retain the talent we had. We also had more clients in Philadelphia that we didn't have before.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE WORLD has not forgotten about the plight of Philadelphia artist James Dupree, whose vast Mantua studio has been condemned by the city under eminent domain. So far, four filmmakers are producing documentaries on Dupree and his fight against the city, and his supporters are reaching out to Oscar-nominated director Spike Lee, the artist said. On April 26, the 63-year-old artist will open his Dupree Studios, the massive property at the center of the fight, to the world in an event called "Save Dupree Studios: The Dupree Dream.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
ARTIST James Dupree says that despite the city's "You're gonna love the arts in Philly" slogan, Philadelphia hasn't been showing him any love. Instead, Dupree said, he has been confronted with pain and despair over a continuing legal struggle with the city to keep his studio space in Mantua. The city Redevelopment Authority wants to take his massive, 8,600 square-foot studio building, on Haverford Avenue near 36th Street, to make room for a supermarket and parking lot. His studio is filled with 5,000 works of art - including wildly colorful pieces, mixed-media jewelry boxes with feathers, and a wall installation showing how the city helps developers take property from low-income homeowners.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
An enchanting play about enchantment. With Aaron Cromie working his theatrical magic, Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium's production of Ondine , by the French modernist Jean Giraudoux, is a charmer. The tiny stage at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 5 is the perfect venue. Lisi Stoessel's set looks like an illustration from an old book of fairy tales, a little house in the midst of a dark forest. This, combined with Matt Sharp's evocative lighting and Adriano Shaplin's sensational sound design in which storms rage and the air is filled with voices, creates a world where Hans (Andrew Carroll)
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
SOME OF THE artwork in the basement art studio that Vicki Landers and Ray Deca run in Center City brims with the perspective of the disabled artists who created it. On one canvas, "PISS on pity" is the slogan beside the symbol of a person in a wheelchair. Another work pictures a woman sitting, head bowed, in a wheelchair, beside an image of the same woman standing, head held high, in a slinky, sexy gown. Artists Landers and Deca opened Independence EDGE Studio last weekend in the same space where the disability-advocacy group Liberty Resources has run an art studio since 2000.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Dupree says city officials are trying to pave paradise and put up a supermarket. Dupree, a renowned Philadelphia artist, is embroiled in a bitter back-and-forth with the city over the fate of his art studio, an 8,600-square-foot building that takes up nearly a block along Haverford Avenue in the Mantua section of West Philadelphia. The property was seized in December 2012 by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority. The authority condemned a two-block stretch through eminent domain, a legal process that allows government to take private property, pay the owner, and develop the land for public use. When the authority seized the Mantua property, it said the surrounding neighborhood was in desperate need of a supermarket.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN LOGAN DRY looks at Vernon Park, he sees potential. Dry and his partners, architecture and landscape-architecture students at Philadelphia University, have a big vision for the green space, on Germantown Avenue near Chelten, including building up the park's path system and revitalizing the business and housing corridor along its borders. "It has great bones, and is rooted in great history," said Dry, 22. "We wanted to bring life back to it while keeping its distinctive identity.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The Kimmel Center is shining a light on its black box. The center's Innovation Studio has long been a forgotten space, a rehearsal room turned into a no-frills performance space that hosted second-rank touring productions. All that is changing. On Thursday, the Kimmel will unveil an inviting glass entrance on Spruce Street for a re-branded SEI Innovation Studio, and show off improvements made to the 200-seat black-box theater with funding support from SEI, the financial-services firm based in Oaks.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A half-century ago, pop music's most popular, most important band had its first of seven straight anni mirabiles . In 1963, the Beatles became an international sensation. A very good year it was. (In a much-discussed June article in the Atlantic, Colin Fleming declared 1963 the quintessential Beatles year.) They released two albums, Please Please Me in March, Meet the Beatles in the fall. In their groundbreaking hit, "Please Please Me," they discovered what they could do in a studio; it got to No. 1 in England.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORRISTOWN – What started as a klieg-lit dream to put a movie studio in Norristown ended Wednesday with the old Logan Square Shopping Center being bought at a sheriff's auction by its main investor. Now that the foreclosure suit that spurred the sheriff's sale is over, Montgomery County officials can pursue "whatever remedies are open" to the county to recoup some of the $24.5 million in public funds it put into the project, said the county's chief financial officer, Uri Z. Monson.
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