CollectionsStudy Group
IN THE NEWS

Study Group

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A bright white light at the end of a tunnel. A feeling of being outside your body. A sense of well-being and total love. Contact with a deceased loved one. A spiritual reawakening. These are just some of the phenomena described by people who have had a near-death experience, or NDE, as it is called by members of Delaware Valley Near-Death Studies Inc. "I think we're the only group on the East Coast," said Doris Patterson, past president of the study group, which was formed about six years ago. "We hold four general meetings a year on the Main Line, which are open to the public, plus we have support group meetings for members that are held on the Main Line, in Northeast Philadelphia, and another group is forming in the Lehigh Valley area.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A study released yesterday on the future of the Philadelphia Gas Works came to this conclusion: Sell it. The report, by the Pennsylvania Economy League, an independent financial- analysis group, said the city could expect at least $200 million from the sale. Gas bills of PGW's 516,000 customers would drop by as much as 6 percent, on average, if the gas were controlled by a private company. However, senior citizens probably would lose the $14.4 million in discounts they now enjoy, which the report notes would be sure to raise objections.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three areas of the township are in critical need of public sewers, a citizens' commission told the supervisors Tuesday. Two other areas were identified as less critical but still in need of public sewers within 10 years. The supervisors appointed the study group six months ago to review work done by the Bucks County Water and Sewer Authority and propose alternatives to installing sewers in all of the 60 percent of the township that still uses private, on-lot septic systems. "The 15 members of our committee were not entirely convinced the entire township needed to be sewered," said Steven Gilmore, chairman of the study group.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore B. Cohen, 92, of Narberth, a psychoanalyst who specialized in treating children and adolescents for more than 60 years, died Wednesday, April 22, of dementia at his home. Dr. Cohen was well known for his active study and practice, both focused on what he called "the vulnerable child. " He was deeply committed to understanding children, how they learned, and how their mental health issues could be overcome. In 1976, he organized the first international meeting centered on children and adolescents.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
A regional study group that is hammering out a water plan for northern Gloucester County communities has told local officials that their communities must decide soon whether they will participate. The state, which has ordered more than 36 communities in South Jersey to substantially cut their use of ground water, has set a March 1988 deadline for each to explain how it will make up the shortage. The state has ordered these communities to reduce water consumption by a total of 55 million gallons a day. But Wenonah Mayor Jack C. Sheppard, who is chairing the regional study group that includes Gloucester County and local officials and area engineers, said last week that local officials must decide on alternate sources of water even sooner.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As they prepare for the deluge of cars that would accompany development of a commercial zone next to Interstate 95, officials from Newtown and Lower Makefield Townships agree on at least one point: Doing nothing could be disastrous. That was the consensus yesterday when representatives of both communities discussed preliminary ideas for road construction and improvements in the area, where about 350 undeveloped acres are zoned for office and research buildings. If the land were fully developed, and no road changes were planned, rush-hour traffic "would be a nightmare," transportation engineer David A. Stroud told township supervisors and engineers who belong to a study group considering the issue.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | By Tina Kelley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Arlene Spector uses her needle to create sacramental embroidery, to give her family a sense of Jewish tradition. "We call it mikdash maot, making the home a small sanctuary, keeping a sense of Judaism in the home," said Spector, of Cherry Hill. As president of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Needlework, which meets at the Jewish Community Center in Cherry Hill, Spector leads monthly meetings, some devoted to study, some devoted to hands- on work.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
A planning group studying ways to expand the Downingtown Area Regional Authority's (DARA) sewage-treatment capacity by 5 million gallons a day has been asked informally to consider increasing that capacity by 800,000 more gallons a day. Representatives of Rouse and Associates, developer of the 1,300-acre Church Farm School site, told DARA's Phase III study group at a meeting Thursday that they eventually want to transfer 800,000 gallons of...
BUSINESS
June 15, 1991 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials of Arco Chemical Co. and the federal government are dismissing a new industry study that suggests the Clean Air Act's formula for reducing smog does not work. The study, a joint effort released this week by the three major U.S. automakers and 14 oil companies, concluded that reducing aromatics - octane boosters that react with the sun to form smog - and adding oxygen to gasoline had "no clear effect on ozone formation. " Reducing aromatics and adding an oxygenate - a compound that adds oxygen to gasoline, such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE)
NEWS
December 5, 1986 | By James J. Kilpatrick
What has become of the old values in American life today? In a mid-November report that deserves a wider reading than it has received, a White House study group looked at traditional values and found them in sorry shape. Somewhere along the way, in the "me first" generation of the 1960s and 1970s, old concepts of virtue and right conduct took a beating. The study group's primary concern was the value of family, the core unit of father and mother, caring for their children and guiding them toward constructive adulthood.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore B. Cohen, 92, of Narberth, a psychoanalyst who specialized in treating children and adolescents for more than 60 years, died Wednesday, April 22, of dementia at his home. Dr. Cohen was well known for his active study and practice, both focused on what he called "the vulnerable child. " He was deeply committed to understanding children, how they learned, and how their mental health issues could be overcome. In 1976, he organized the first international meeting centered on children and adolescents.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Rachael and John's friendship started in fall 2008, during their first year of nursing school at Thomas Jefferson University. They often studied in the same group, and sometimes drank coffee or beers on their own after class. Rachael felt as comfortable around John as she did her girlfriends. She could tell him anything. Both were unavailable then. Their second year, John and Rachael were assigned to some of the same clinical groups - about 10 students assigned to work with professionals and patients in pediatrics, psychiatric and other nursing disciplines.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Barrett of Philadelphia works two jobs, but he doesn't want that to be his life. In February, battling stress, he withdrew from Towson University in Maryland, but he hopes to return to college. Marcy Allen of Salem, N.J., graduated from college in 2010 with degrees in theater and French, but the only employment she could find was as a part-time mail carrier - the job she held the summer after her freshman year at Rider University. The two, both in their 20s and navigating unexpected bumps in life, have found solace and strength in a Wednesday night Bible study group in Camden led by a man whose own youthful charisma, they say, is part of the attraction.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | BY GERALD K. McOSCAR
ASK THE average person to describe the typical young drug addict or alcoholic, and odds are he will describe a poor, inner-city high-school dropout from a single-parent household, usually a racial minority. Not so fast. A new study identifies a link between high IQ in childhood and illegal drug use at ages 16 and 30. Writing in the British Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , researchers James White and G. David Batty used data from a study that tracked over 30 years 8,000 Britons born in 1970.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
Hospitals make unsupported claims for robotic surgery Don't believe everything you read about the superiority of robotic surgery, even if the claims are on a hospital website. A new study of 400 randomly selected hospital websites found that 89 percent claimed robotic surgery is better than conventional surgery (for example, less pain, shorter recovery, less blood loss, improved cancer outcomes), even though there are no rigorous studies showing such benefits. Promotional materials provided by device manufacturers were used on 73 percent of the websites.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Mastery Charter Schools in Philadelphia are among 21 charters across the country that have won national honors for dramatic academic gains among low-income students. A study by New Leaders for New Schools highlighted student performance in the 2007-08 academic year at Mastery's Shoemaker campus in West Philadelphia and its Lenfest campus in Center City. The New York nonprofit praised Mastery yesterday for "tackling the issue of educational equity head-on. By placing an emphasis on effective management and proven practices, Mastery is growing into a leader in urban education.
NEWS
December 11, 2007 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
LIKE clockwork, the well-dressed couple always sat in the back of Pearl Room 101 during the twice-weekly international- trade course at Drexel University. Before the start of every class this fall - held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12 to 1:50 p.m. - Edward K. Anderton brought lunch to his honey, Jocelyn S. Kirsch, usually a fruit-and-cheese selection from Starbucks, one student who saw the couple told the Daily News. During class, Kirsch, a Drexel senior, took copious notes on her computer and asked her fair share of questions.
NEWS
December 18, 2006 | By Charles Krauthammer
As a result of the Iraq Study Group, President Bush has been given one last chance to alter course on Iraq. This did not, however, come about the way James Baker intended. It came about because the long-anticipated report turned out to be such a widely agreed-upon farce. From its wildly hyped, multiple magazine-cover rollout (Annie Leibovitz in Men's Vogue, no less) to its mishmash of 79 (no less) recommendations, the report has fallen so flat that the field is now clear for the president to recommend to a war-weary country something new and bold.
NEWS
December 8, 2006
IT TURNS OUT THAT THE IRAQ Study Group is almost as untethered from reality as President Bush is. Sure, its long-awaited report, released Wednesday, finally confirms what critics have been saying for four years ? and for which their patriotism has been questioned: Iraq is a disaster that quickly is moving toward a full-blown humanitarian catastrophe. It is a war that cannot be won militarily. To have a chance of saving the situation, the United States must ask enemies Iran and Syria to help.
NEWS
May 3, 2006 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey should develop a test windmill project off its coast to gauge the economic and environmental impacts of the alternative energy source, a state panel recommended in a study released yesterday. The nine-member panel said that wind could help meet demand that is spiking electricity rates in New Jersey, but that more data were needed to determine how wind turbines in coastal waters might affect migratory birds and mammals. Such information could be gleaned from a carefully monitored and controlled project of fewer than 80 turbines, most likely with private help, the report said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|