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Subcontractors

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NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a City Charter change that would extend the "living wage" requirements to city subcontractors. The living-wage standard, which requires that city contractors pay their employees $10.88 an hour, or 150 percent of the federal minimum wage, currently applies to contractors, but not their subcontractors. A city Law Department ruling earlier this year said the charter does not give Council the authority to force the standard on subcontractors.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
A NEW LEASE agreement between Philadelphia International Airport and the airlines that use it will serve as more than just an economic stimulus. The lease, approved by City Council yesterday, ensures that airport subcontractors will pay workers $12 per hour as required in the living-wage standard passed by Mayor Nutter in January. The lease will take effect July 1. The agreement follows extensive discussion among the airport's chief executive officer, Mark Gale; SEIU Local 32BJ's vice president, Gabe Morgan; and American Airlines vice president of government and airport affairs Michael Minerva.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city Law Department says the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter does not allow City Council to enforce minimum "living wage" requirements on Philadelphia International Airport subcontractors - only on businesses with direct city contracts. Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. said Tuesday he would introduce a charter-change amendment in Council on Thursday to clarify and extend the city's wage and benefits standard to employees of city subcontractors. The provision would enable Council to "require those who contract with the city or are recipients of city financial assistance to pass along the requirements of such an ordinance to subcontractors (at any tier)
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER will sign an executive order today raising the city's minimum-wage requirements for contractors working on public projects and extending them to subcontractors, according to an administration memo obtained by the Daily News . "The Executive Order will raise the minimum wage required in City contracts and subcontracts, and implement annual adjustments for inflation," the memo said. "The Executive Order will also direct contracting departments and other agencies to implement the requirements as to subcontractors, consistent with recent legislative actions.
NEWS
October 13, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Subcontractors who helped build Lincoln Financial Field decided yesterday not to picket Sunday's Eagles game but moved to crank up the pressure in their quest to have their financial disputes resolved. The subcontractors, who did everything from paving the football stadium's parking lot to building the luxury suites, claim they are still collectively owed $20 million to $30 million for their work, more than a year after the $380 million stadium opened. As many as 40 companies may be affected.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2005 | By Vernon Clark and Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Kelly Drive was snarled with traffic yesterday as thousands of union workers converged on the construction site of an East Falls apartment complex to protest the builder's use of nonunion subcontractors. Union leaders said the subcontractors were paying substandard wages and benefits, employing illegal immigrants, and importing workers from out of state instead of using workers from the area. "This is not about union vs. nonunion. It's about union vs. nonhuman," said John Dougherty, business manager of International Brotherhood of Electricians Local 98. The developer acknowledged using nonunion subcontractors, but said it was the only way to make the project financially viable.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | By Anne L. Boles and Lem Lloyd, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
To some of the workers who built it, the largest public works project in Chester County's history is becoming a monument to bad faith. The $36 million office complex is nearly complete, and county employees are already moving in. But many of the firms that helped build it complain that Biehn Construction Inc. of Quakertown, the project's general contractor, has failed to pay them. Seven subcontractors and suppliers contacted yesterday said Biehn still owed them more than $400,000 for work they have completed.
NEWS
October 14, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City and state officials are looking into complaints by subcontractors who contend they have not been paid for their work at Lincoln Financial Field, which opened last year. Subcontractors who did everything from paving the football stadium's parking lot to building the luxury suites contend they are collectively owed $20 million to $30 million for their work, more than a year after the $380 million stadium opened. Dozens of companies say they are affected. Today, Philadelphia City Councilman Richard Mariano (D., Seventh District)
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter signed an executive order Tuesday requiring city contractors and the companies they subcontract with to pay a minimum wage of $10.88 per hour for city work for the rest of the year. Starting in January, the order said, that minimum will rise to $12 an hour and will be adjusted for inflation going forward. Nutter cited the State of the Union message in which President Obama urged mayors and governors not to wait for Congress to act on the minimum wage. "Today, I will in fact answer the president's call," Nutter said.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Anne L. Boles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
County officials are finding that straightening out problems with the county's largest public works project is not as easy as it sounds. Subcontractors and suppliers have complained that they have yet to be paid for much of their work on the county's $36 million government services center in West Goshen. But the county can't simply write them all checks, much as officials might like to. The contractor, the contract language and red tape stand in their way. The county's contract is with Biehn Construction Inc. of Quakertown, which in turn hired the subcontractors and suppliers and was supposed to pay them.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 26, 2016
ISSUE | PHILA. AIRPORT Workers mistreated The fight for livable wages and appropriate working conditions has reached Philadelphia International Airport (" Bumpy skies ," Wednesday). I marched with the airport workers who walked off the job on Tuesday. Their concerns about low wages, no benefits, and mistreatment are real, and they're urgent. The city got behind these wheelchair attendants, sky caps, aircraft cabin cleaners, and bag handlers in 2014 and overwhelmingly passed a ballot measure to raise the wage.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
When Bill Cumby Jr. and his father, Bill Sr., started W.S. Cumby Inc. in 1981, they began it as a union general contracting and project management company. "In 1981, if you wanted to do our kind of work - good-quality commercial work - you were a union contractor," said Cumby Jr., 66, who took over as president in 1998. By the late 1980s and early 1990s, father and son switched to a merit shop (non-union) business, repudiating their contracts with the unions for carpenters and laborers.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Business: Springfield, Delaware County-based general contractor, project management company; $60 million in revenues. Staff: 40 full-time, 30 regular subcontractors. Projects: Buildings at colleges - Haverford, Princeton, Swarthmore; Morris Arboretum; Ardmore Farmers' Market. Point of pride: Evangelist for green building methods.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As travelers pass through airports on their way to visit their families this Thanksgiving, they should take note of the people pushing grandma's wheelchair, loading dad's golf clubs, or quietly mopping the terminal. These are some of the people who have been bypassed by a recovering economy. They suffer disproportionately from stagnant wages that have about 5 percent less buying power than they did five years ago. They are struggling to feed and shelter their families on wages that put them at or near the poverty line.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2015 | Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney said Thursday he favors a $15 an hour minimum wage in Philadelphia, but thinks the "best way" to get that is for workers to organize in labor unions and collectively bargain with employers. Kenney, whose father was a unionized firefighter, told more than 200 cheering nonunion Philadelphia International Airport workers that when he takes office in January "some things are going to change around here. " Private firms that have contracts with airlines to provide skycaps, wheelchair attendants, baggage handlers and aircraft cabin cleaners - the nonunion workers in the protest - will be required to pay their employees $12 an hour.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
A NEW LEASE agreement between Philadelphia International Airport and the airlines that use it will serve as more than just an economic stimulus. The lease, approved by City Council yesterday, ensures that airport subcontractors will pay workers $12 per hour as required in the living-wage standard passed by Mayor Nutter in January. The lease will take effect July 1. The agreement follows extensive discussion among the airport's chief executive officer, Mark Gale; SEIU Local 32BJ's vice president, Gabe Morgan; and American Airlines vice president of government and airport affairs Michael Minerva.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The low-paid airport workers who cheered when Mayor Nutter signed an executive order in May that extended minimum wage benefits to subcontractors such as them are not cheering anymore. Three weeks have passed since the mayor's order, applying the $10.88 minimum wage requirement to subcontractors, went into effect. But the paychecks of many of those airport workers still reflect $7.50 hourly wages. The order applies to any bids or proposals issued after May 20, and starting Jan. 1, all proposals and contracts will include a $12-an-hour minimum wage requirement.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter signed an executive order Tuesday requiring city contractors and the companies they subcontract with to pay a minimum wage of $10.88 per hour for city work for the rest of the year. Starting in January, the order said, that minimum will rise to $12 an hour and will be adjusted for inflation going forward. Nutter cited the State of the Union message in which President Obama urged mayors and governors not to wait for Congress to act on the minimum wage. "Today, I will in fact answer the president's call," Nutter said.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER will sign an executive order today raising the city's minimum-wage requirements for contractors working on public projects and extending them to subcontractors, according to an administration memo obtained by the Daily News . "The Executive Order will raise the minimum wage required in City contracts and subcontracts, and implement annual adjustments for inflation," the memo said. "The Executive Order will also direct contracting departments and other agencies to implement the requirements as to subcontractors, consistent with recent legislative actions.
REAL_ESTATE
November 11, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
For developer Brad Haber, Neighborhoods of Cedar Creek in Egg Harbor City represents both a change from what he's used to and a chance to follow the advice that veteran builders gave him when he started 35 years ago. The change? Instead of being part of a big home-building company - he was, until 2007, a K. Hovnanian vice president for South Jersey - the Cherry Hill native is constructing pretty much on his own what will be 400 homes on 423 acres surrounding the three-year-old, 87-acre Cedar Creek High School complex.
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