CollectionsSubject
IN THE NEWS

Subject

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 31, 2012
Flyers winger Wayne Simmonds was the subject of racial slurs after getting in a fight during a game in the Czech Republic on Sunday, Yahoo! Sports reported. Fans chanted "opice," which means monkey, according to reports. The marketing director of Chomutov, which faced Simmonds' team, issued an apology. "We are disgusted with the behavior of small groups of spectators who significantly damaged the reputation of the whole. . . . club. We would like to deeply apologize to Mr. Simmonds and the Liberec players," David Dinda said in a statement.
NEWS
September 14, 2009
DO YOU have anything else to put on this page other than Michael Vick letters? The subject has been so worn out that I'm getting disgusted. The subject has been going on for weeks and it's run its course. It's time to stop the letters. I have no respect for the Eagles and Andy Reid for hiring him and will be rooting for the Eagles to lose. Richard J. Stamets Pennsauken, N.J.
SPORTS
October 10, 2010
Subject: The goetta city So the NLDS heads back to Cincinnati. You guys ever been there? For a Bengals game? College hoops? A Pete Rose gambling seminar? Subject: The goetta city No. But I had a nightmare about it once.  What's this goetta stuff I keep hearing about? Did they steal our scrapple idea and just rename it? Subject: The goetta city I made an annual college hoops visit to Cincinnati and never heard of goetta, unless that's what they call their signature chili over spaghetti.
NEWS
November 28, 1989
COURTS HAVE A FAMILIAR LOOK It is a subject of regret, that the well known necessity of furnishing better accommodations for the several courts . . . has remained thus far unprovided for by those to whose control the matter is committed. The subject has been repeatedly presented by former grand juries, and it is one in which the community are deeply interested. The courtrooms are so manifestly inadequate to the wants of the county, and have fallen so much behind the accommodations provided in almost every county in the commonwealth, that they are a reproach to us as a community . . . Both the public interests and necessities demand attention to the subject.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
A look at the environment was the subject of a nature 'stomp' Saturday at Bristol Township's Silver Lake Nature Center. At left, the group wades through Black Ditch Creek. Above, Chris Tenaglia (left) and Mike Cherkowski examine their finds.
SPORTS
March 22, 2011
From: Gonzalez, John To: Fox, Ashley; Fitzpatrick, Frank Subject: Considering Castillo   The Phils signed Luis Castillo to a minor-league deal. If the 35-year-old makes the club, the oldest team in baseball will get even older. No word on whether the Phils now qualify for an early-bird special discount at Perkins. Tea leaves time: Seems like a low-risk move for the Phils, but what, if anything, does this latest addition suggest about Chase Utley's situation?
SPORTS
March 8, 2011
From: Gonzalez, John To: Fox, Ashley; Fitzpatrick, Frank Subject: Go Westbrook, young man?   Brian Westbrook said he talks to Andy Reid almost every week and he'd "love to be back in Philly. " Do you think the Eagles would be - or should be - interested in bringing him back? From: Fitzpatrick, Frank To: Fox, Ashley; Gonzalez, John Subject: Go Westbrook, young man?   Perhaps as a coach. I don't see a great need for him - or his salary - on the field.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two city educators have lost their administrative credentials in the first public actions taken in a widespread Philadelphia standardized test-cheating scandal. Former Philadelphia School District principals Barbara McCreery of Communications Technology High School and Lolamarie Davis-O'Rourke of Locke Elementary both voluntarily surrendered their administrative certificates in lieu of discipline last month, the Pennsylvania Department of Education said Wednesday. Both confessed to cheating, an official with firsthand knowledge of the investigations said.
NEWS
June 23, 2006
Commentator Ann Coulter's criticism of some of the 9/11 widows, the so-called "Jersey Girls," raises this question: Is it unseemly of 9/11 family members to criticize the Bush administration's national security policies or unseemly to criticize the families for speaking up? Let us know your thoughts, in 200 words or fewer, by July 7. Letters are subject to editing. Please e-mail your responses to sjletters@phillynews.com, saying "9/11 families" in the subject line; fax them to the South Jersey Commentary editor at 856-779-3221; or mail them to South Jersey Commentary editor, The Inquirer, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
LIVING
January 2, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
On the subject of what's hot, what ever happened to . . . Paula Abdul Hammer New York Mets Vanilla Ice Willard Rouse W. Wilson Goode Delta Burke Philip Michael Thomas Billy Dee Williams Kitty Carlisle Fab Five Freddy George Bush Milton Street Henry Kissinger Pierre Cardin Anita Bryant Harold Robbins Teena Marie Joan Collins Tony Orlando The Captain...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
FX's The Americans , which returns at 10 p.m. Wednesday for a fourth season, is about many things: deception, divided loyalties, U.S.-Soviet relations in the 1980s, and the maybe slightly less volatile relations between married spies Philip (Matthew Rhys) and Elizabeth Jennings (Keri Russell). But it's also about wigs. "Wigs! Beards! Mustaches! Yes!" executive producer Joel Fields said when I raised the hairy issue of how the Jenningses disguise themselves. Fields, who runs The Americans with creator Joe Weisberg, said he loves spotting a stranger on the set, "getting two paces past them and realizing, 'Wait a second . . . 'That's Matthew,' [or]
NEWS
February 13, 2016
By John Nivala The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has said that any historic designation of any church property without its consent "allows the government to place undue restrictions on religious structures and property, which in effect interferes with the free practice of our religion. " If Philadelphia were Seattle, that position would be spot on. The Washington state Supreme Court, using the state's constitution, has found that even initiating the designation procedure violates a church's right to free exercise of religion.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
It's been a tough year for proponents of gay-conversion therapy: In 2015, 18 state legislatures considered or enacted laws against ex-gay therapy for minors, a program promising to turn gay men straight was deemed a fraud by a New Jersey civil court, and even President Obama condemned the practice. So it's fitting that, in its twilight, the ex-gay movement is now the subject of a new history, by Temple University sociologist Tom Waidzunas. The Straight Line: How the Fringe Science of Ex-Gay Therapy Reoriented Sexuality , released by the University of Minnesota Press, documents the evolution and decline of "reorientation" - which began with early experiments like induced seizures, electroshock, and aversion therapy, and continued in the mainstream psychology community well into the 2000s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
"I'm poorly made. " That's Steve Jobs talking - well, wordsmith Aaron Sorkin channeling Steve Jobs - near the end of the film that bears the name of the Apple cofounder and late, lamented, mythologized, criticized tech icon. Jobs (Michael Fassbender) is talking to his daughter, Lisa (Perla Haney-Jardine), a Harvard freshman whose relationship with dad has been rocky, to say the least. First, Jobs denied that he was her father, and even after DNA tests proved paternity, he refused to acknowledge her. In Steve Jobs , directed with cinematic gusto by Danny Boyle from a theater-piece Sorkin script, Lisa comes and goes (ages 5 and 9, two very good young actresses)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
They were looking for the secret of life - not some romantic, gooey notion of the secret of life, but the real secret. And, astonishingly, they found it. Photograph 51 by Anna Ziegler is about the discovery of DNA. Under Kathryn MacMillan's direction, this play launches the Lantern Theater Company's project titled "Women in Science/Science on Stage. " The subject is Rosalind Franklin (the excellent Geneviève Perrier), who joins a major lab at King's College. Not only is she a Jew in post-World War II Europe, but also, as a woman, she seems to be somewhere between a freak and a joke.
SPORTS
January 9, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
TONY WROTEN went out of his way to say how much he loves every aspect of his professional life in Philadelphia. You didn't have to look very hard to see the tinge of wonderment in his eyes, however, when he was asked about a rumor circulating that he may be part of a deal that would send him to the Los Angeles Clippers. "You hear it. You hear what you hear, but whatever happens, happens," said Wroten, the Sixers' leading scorer at 17.2 a game. "I just control the ball on the court, really.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
By Michael Carroll I confess that I am a little envious of the peculiar and controversial public employee retirement program known as DROP, for Deferred Retirement Option Plan. I like the image, the sound of it, and the opening it provides for imagination. I would also like the money. Few inside Philadelphia government understand DROP completely, and even fewer outside have a clue. As I understand it, city employees declare their intention to retire in a few years, which is supposed to give the city time to plan for their departure.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Doug Wright's over-the-top play is being given an over-the-top production by Luna Theater Company. Quills is about the over-the-top Marquis de Sade, who lent his name to sadism, sexual pleasure derived from inflicting pain, and who wrote novels of shocking, violent pornography. Excess is the name of the game here: sexually, literarily, and theatrically. As Wright explains in his notes on style, "Characters are not good or bad; they are either kissed by God or yoked in Satan's merciless employ.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
His plugged-in friends said he was a fool not to buy health insurance on the federal marketplace. Mark Gaines knew they were right. He was, after all, a 26-year-old law school graduate. But if a judge had asked him for a summation of the Affordable Care Act last fall, it would have been a one-sentence brief. "I didn't know anything about it," said Gaines, who lives in South Philadelphia and was working part-time. "I knew that it was going to make [insurance] open to everyone and make it cheaper.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Descendants of the family of Msgr. Patrick Garvey, once rector of St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, are challenging the seminary's decision to sell Thomas Eakins' 1902 portrait of Garvey, arguing that the seminary does not own it. Robert E. Goldman, a former federal prosecutor who is aiding the descendants, said the portrait, painted during Eakins' visits to the City Avenue seminary at the turn of the 20th century, was put in the seminary's hands for...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|