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Subsidy

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NEWS
July 16, 1997 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The city may not be plowing money into the proposed Hilton Garden Inn atop the Gallery II parking garage, but taxpayers have already shelled out more than $24 million on the garage itself. Since the garage was finished in 1984, the city has made annual payments to its owner, Parametric Associates, to offset the firm's losses and to enable it to repay money it borrowed to finance the structure at 11th and Arch streets. City Council approved the complex deal for the construction of the Gallery II mall, the garage, and adjacent One Reading Center office building in 1982 at the urging of Mayor Bill Green.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
The Goode administration, in an apparent attempt to force better service out of SEPTA, has taken a step that may risk a shutdown of rail and transit service in July. Public Property Commissioner Dudley R. Sykes, who negotiates city subsidies to SEPTA, has notified the agency that the city will not renew its existing subsidy agreement after it expires at the end of June. Without an agreement, SEPTA board chairman Lewis R. Gould said today, the agency would face "a very distinct possibility" of a systemwide shutdown.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1990 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of mass-transit riders in the Philadelphia area soon may get an unexpected bonus at work - a $15-per-month, tax-free subsidy to offset their cost of using public transportation. Area companies will be asked to provide the subsidy under a program being developed by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. The so-called Commuter Benefit Plan could be operating by January or February, commission officials said yesterday. The program would take advantage of little-known provisions of the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984 and the Tax Reform Act of 1986.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when the unemployment rate tops 10 percent, many unemployed Americans will no longer qualify for federally subsidized health insurance. That's because a nine-month health-insurance subsidy that was part of the federal stimulus legislation began to end yesterday for many who have relied on it. As many as seven million people were eligible for the subsidy in 2009, according to government statistics. People who have not used up their nine-month subsidy will be able to finish it. But no one laid off after the end of the year will be able to start using the subsidy.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joined by an influential Republican state senator, the state-owned South Jersey Port Corp. went public yesterday in its hardball political campaign to avoid being privatized by tax cutters in the legislature and governor's office. The senator, John Matheusen of Gloucester County, toured the agency's Beckett Street terminal in Camden, then heaped praise on its chief executive, Joseph A. Balzano. "What we've seen here today," he said, "certainly solidifies the South Jersey Port Corp.
SPORTS
December 13, 1998 | By Tim Panaccio This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
The American bailout of Canadian clubs continues - and rightly so. Among the news items coming out of last week's NHL board of governors meetings in Phoenix was that the league had approved continued funding for three distressed Canadian franchises. This season, $3.5 million each was made available to Calgary, Edmonton and Ottawa. At least that much will be given next season. If you're the Flyers, with a $42.3 million payroll - second highest in the league - $3.5 million is chump change.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Curtis Eichelberger and Oliver Staley, Bloomberg News
Rutgers University forgave $100,000 of its football coach's interest-free home loan last year. Its women's basketball coach got monthly golf and car allowances. Both collected bonuses without winning a championship. Meanwhile, the history department took away professors' desk phones to save money and shrank its doctoral program by 25 percent. After funding cuts by the deficit-strapped Legislature, the state university froze professors' salaries, cut the use of photocopies and jacked up tuition, housing, and fees.
NEWS
February 11, 1986 | By MICHAEL DAYS, Daily News Staff Writer
People who qualify for the federally funded Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will receive an unexpected 20 percent increase in yearly grants to help heat their homes this winter, Gov. Thornburgh said yesterday. But even with the increase, most recipients still will be getting a significantly lower subsidy than they received last year. The state said it doesn't keep figures on the average subsidy granted statewide this year because of the formula's complexity. The Philadelphia Gas Works said its records indicate PGW customers who qualified for the subsidy have received an average grant of $139.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Kate Shatzkin, Special to The Inquirer
Seven Main Line school districts received the basic-education subsidy funds they expected to keep their secure financial positions in the coming year, the Pennsylvania Department of Education announced last week. The awards make the districts luckier than some Delaware County counterparts, which will receive less money from the state than they had anticipated. The Delaware County districts - Southeast Delco, Upper Darby and William Penn - were disappointed to learn that they would receive from $156,000 to $220,000 less than they had budgeted for the 1987-88 year.
NEWS
April 25, 1987 | By MICHAEL DAYS, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Ramona Smith contributed to this report.)
In an attempt to force SEPTA to provide better service, the Goode administration is trying to tie the city's $40.8 million subsidy to the transit system to more participation in policy-making. "We want to make sure that we have the necessary checks and balances, the necessary oversight involvement in major policy decisions," Mayor Goode said yesterday. "I have experienced dissatisfaction all along with (SEPTA's) overall management, with overall safety policy, with their responsiveness to the city in various areas," Goode said.
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NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
In its second ruling in three years upholding President Obama's health-care law, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday turned back challengers' claims that the law barred health insurance subsidies to millions in 34 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The 6-3 opinion, written by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., upheld a central pillar of the Affordable Care Act and allows the administration's five-year-old initiative to get health coverage to more Americans. The decision lifted a cloud that threatened to end coverage for millions of Americans, disrupt state insurance markets, and pressure politicians whose constituents receive the subsidies to find a way to save them.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Myra Kodner has spent most of her career helping people qualify for programs such as food stamps and Social Security benefits. She knows qualifying people for a government program means submitting the right information in the correct format. So when her husband, Don, lost his job in customer service - and with it the couple's health insurance - in March 2014, Kodner swung into work mode. She gathered the couple's information and called the Affordable Care Act's healthcare.gov help line to buy insurance.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she could buy health insurance on healthcare.gov last year, Gina Connor saw her doctor only when it was "unavoidable. " With most of her income going to caring for her child and paying the mortgage and utility bills, Connor relied on over-the-counter remedies for some five years to see her through. But doctor visits became "unavoidable" for colds and other ailments, Connor had to pay out of pocket. "It was expensive, depending on what was done," said the 38-year-old Upper Darby resident.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It took Holly Phares 27 days and 20 hours to enroll in health insurance during 2013's disastrous rollout of the Affordable Care Act website. She doesn't expect a repeat of her slog through last year's cyber hell. But the choral director for Tabernacle United Church in West Philadelphia will be shopping the marketplace for a better deal rather than simply reenrolling in her Independence Blue Cross platinum PPO. "They say there are twice as many choices" in the marketplace, says Phares, 51. "I'm just not going to stick with Blue Cross.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
When the Affordable Care Act marketplace reopens on November 15, Lenora Fedick will "more than likely" reenroll in her current Independence Blue Cross plan. But before she commits, the Phoenixville resident wants to know that she's getting every penny's worth for the premium she's paying. So Fedick is going to do a little shopping. "I want to make sure that I'm getting the best deal," said Fedick, who was among the roughly 50 residents who attended Independence's "Renewal" seminar at the Phoenixville YMCA last week.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Young adults are paying as much or more in premiums for the cheapest bronze plans purchased on the Affordable Care Act marketplace as people ages 54 to 64, according to a University of Tennessee Health Science Center study. The study, published online last week in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that the reverse premium age curve - premiums should be cheaper for younger people, who use less health care - is the result of how tax credit subsidies are calculated under the law. It could mean that paying the penalty for not buying insurance as required by the individual mandate would be less than the monthly premiums for those low-premium policies.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Seven months after coverage began for people who bought health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, more are now insured and most of the nearly 10 million people who have signed up say they are satisfied with their plans. Yet now a new set of challenges looms. Will the plans be affordable, and will users know how to use tiered networks and other innovations without incurring huge bills? "The law has pretty much met the early benchmarks, but if it stopped here, I don't think anyone would declare it a success," says Larry Levitt, senior vice president for special initiatives at the Kaiser Family Foundation, which is tracking the law. The law offers new insurance options for the individual market.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - It may take several years to know for certain whether the $82 million in tax credits New Jersey awarded the 76ers on Tuesday to open a new practice facility in Camden will improve the city's economy. What is clear: Those tax breaks are part of a larger surge in subsidies granted by the state to businesses since Gov. Christie took office in 2010. A new report, to be released Wednesday, says New Jersey has awarded $4 billion in tax subsidies and credits to corporations this decade - up from $1.2 billion in the 2000s, and $160 million in the 1990s.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Michelle Lamb recalls it being "pretty easy" buying health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace last December. But using her Independence Blue Cross plan has been maddening. The 39-year-old West Oak Lane day care teacher has made three monthly premium payments at more than three times her subsidized rate just to make sure she was covered. That's a steep price for insurance that has been canceled three times - for nonpayment. "I paid my first premium payment in January and have not received a statement since," she said.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Update: Tuesday's historical commission adjourned without a vote and another hearing is being considered before mid-February. Earlier Story An analysis by an outside consultant hired by the Philadelphia Historical Commission to assess the viability of the historic and deteriorating Boyd Theater on Chestnut Street concludes that redevelopment "is not economically feasible without significant public subsidies. " The conclusion - that only a large infusion of public cash can save the Boyd - could be critical to forthcoming decisions from historical commission panels.
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