CollectionsSubstance Abuse
IN THE NEWS

Substance Abuse

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
September 8, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Charles White of the Los Angeles Rams, the NFL's leading rusher last season, and a pair of Chicago Bears, star defensive end Richard Dent and running back Calvin Thomas, were suspended by the league for 30 days yesterday for violating its substance-abuse policy. All three must stay out of their teams' training facilities until Oct. 7, a league spokesman said. In all, 17 players have been suspended this year for violating the league's policy. Rams coach John Robinson said the substance found in White's test was alcohol.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Board of Education has decided to begin a Student Assistance Program to provide counseling for students with drug- or alcohol-abuse problems. Starting in September, students will be able to seek help, on a confidential basis for the first time, from counselors at the schools. The high school will have a walk-in office set up specifically to deal with student problems. The board unanimously endorsed the program at a work session last night. Marsha Mark, a school social worker, will become coordinator of the program.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Prevention is the goal of the Rancocas Community Aligned for Substance Awareness (R-CASA) - a municipal alliance that will target various age groups during the coming year in a fight against alcohol and drug abuse, according to Anne Moore, chairwoman of the group. The townships of Mount Holly and Westampton have agreed to join forces and funding in the alliance to "make the group have a bigger impact on these efforts in the area," Moore said. The alliance is hoping to attract participation from other municipalities, Moore said.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The overhaul of New Jersey's child-welfare system includes far-reaching improvements in health care, according to a draft of the state's plan. Under part of the plan, obtained yesterday by The Inquirer, the number of families getting substance-abuse treatment would triple, the number of nurses on staff would more than double, and children living in adoptive and foster homes would be enrolled in HMOs. Funding for programs dealing with substance abuse - suspected to play a role in as many as four of every five Division of Youth and Family Services cases - would triple to almost $90 million a year.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By John McDonough, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill Board of Education on Monday approved a staff program on drug and alchohol abuse. The five-hour seminar, to be held sometime in March, is designed to heighten district employees' awareness of substance abuse in the schools. Robert W. Ferris, assistant superintendent of schools, said the session was part of a program started in 1984. "In the summer of 1984 we developed a pilot project to assist with the development of substance-abuse services," Ferris said.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking the stance that any degree of substance abuse is unacceptable, the Upper Dublin Select Joint Committee on Teenage Alcohol Abuse has outlined a series of recommendations to combat the growing problem. The committee presented the results of its summer-long study of teen substance abuse in Upper Dublin to the township commissioners and school board Thursday night. About 30 members of the public attended. "There is a serious and growing problem, and it is not only teen alcohol abuse, but substance abuse," said Leonard Ross, chairman of the committee.
NEWS
October 27, 2004 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Incidents of violence, vandalism and substance abuse are down in Cherry Hill's public schools, according to a report released by the district yesterday. For the 2003-04 school year, there were 87 reported episodes, a 16 percent drop from the previous year's 104. "The report is somewhat encouraging," said Michael Nuzzo, the district's director of security. The drop in violence and vandalism comes despite a steadily growing student population. Cherry Hill has about 11,700 students this school year.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Six months into the Affordable Care Act, local mental-health and substance-abuse professionals have yet to see an uptick in clients using their new benefits. The seeming lack of interest has been disappointing for caregivers, but is not completely unexpected. "It's very early," said Patricia Kleven, director of outpatient mental health services at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment. "I don't know what it will look like in six months or a year. But at the moment, not so much.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday, Philadelphia public school students will have a day off while their teachers, principals and parents discuss one of the most disheartening and pervasive problems facing students and schools - substance abuse. The all-day program is the third annual "instructional review day," inaugurated in 1987 for teachers and administrators in each school to get together and brainstorm for a day on a crucial issue. This year, for the first time, parents have been invited as well.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2016
By Mical Raz Cynthia Figueroa has begun her tenure as commissioner of Philadelphia's Department of Human Services (DHS). She assumes responsibility for a department that is often thrust into the spotlight because of dysfunction and tragedies, such as the 2006 death of Danieal Kelly, a 14-year-old girl with cerebral palsy who had been under the supervision of DHS and a contractor company. In the past decade, DHS has taken numerous steps to improve its care of children. These reforms have further relied on outsourcing care to private contractor companies in the communities, with the goal of supporting families and caring for children in their homes.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Former U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy, a leading advocate for mental health and addiction treatment, joined providers, families that have struggled with drug abuse, and state officials Wednesday in Philadelphia for the first of six hearings around Pennsylvania on barriers to care. Kennedy, a Democrat from Rhode Island who has been public about his struggles with substance abuse, including prescription drugs, urged creating a registry for consumers to lodge complaints about problems accessing treatment, including insurance company denials, lack of availability or long waits for care, and other issues discussed at Wednesday's session.
NEWS
August 30, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - At 28, Jennifer Storm came face to face with her past. She had just become executive director of the Dauphin County Victim/Witness Assistance Program, and her first case involved the rape of a 12-year-old girl. Storm herself had been raped at 12, by a 28-year-old stranger on the way to a roller rink, and suddenly she saw her ordeal in a new light. "I can't even begin to explain how much that little girl gave me," Storm, 41, said in an interview Tuesday. "I had never felt more confident in my life's mission.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Splitsville for Ozzy, Sharon Ozzy Osbourne , 67, and his second wife Sharon (née Arden ), 63, are splitting up after nearly 34 years of marriage, E! News reports. Breakup rumors have dogged the couple for three years. More recently, there have been gossip the split was by Ozzy's inability to stay sober. The rocker has struggled with substance abuse for decades. "I have been sober for three and a quarter years," the Black Sabbath alum tells E! Sharon was absent Monday from her TV gabshow, The Talk . Cohost Julie Chen said "there are many tabloid headlines" of a breakup.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Giving former inmates with histories of addiction monthly injections of a medication that blocks the effects of opioids cuts relapse rates by a third, according to research at five medical centers. Release from prison is among the riskiest times for former addicts, with the loss in physical tolerance and behavioral control so common that often "they relapse the same day," said Charles P. O'Brien, senior author of the study and founding director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Studies of Addiction.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John T. Magee, 85, of Haverford, a physician who was born at Bryn Mawr Hospital and worked there for 37 years, died Wednesday, March 16, at the institution he considered a second home. As word spread of Dr. Magee's death from respiratory failure, hospital spokeswoman Bridget Therriault released a statement honoring the calm and kindly doctor. "It was at Bryn Mawr Hospital that Dr. Magee came into this world, and it was also here that he took his last breath 85 years later," she wrote.
NEWS
March 19, 2016
By Donte L. Hickman Recently, I had a conversation with a leading pastor about what is necessary to shift the trends and transform the urban centers of America. He shocked me by saying that he believes poverty is not the root cause of gang violence, substance abuse, and lethargy among some in the black community today - lack of faith is. He began to highlight our own individual upbringings in abject poverty and argued that he and I obviously were able to choose positive paths of productivity.
NEWS
March 15, 2016
"I have greatly sinned ... in what I have done and in what I have failed to do. "   - From the Confiteor, a prayer said during the Penitential Act during a Roman Catholic Mass By Thomas P. Murt In Western Pennsylvania, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown knowingly protected priests who were known child molesters, according to a grand jury report. The diocese, the report continued, through church connections and pathetic public officials, protected the child-molesting priests from law enforcement and prosecution.
NEWS
February 4, 2016
By Cynthia Reilly In a political climate in which the two major parties don't always see eye to eye, one issue is bringing them together: Republicans and Democrats agree that we must address the tragedy of prescription drug abuse. With 44 people dying every day from overdoses of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and similar opioid pain relievers, there is growing awareness that misuse of these drugs can affect almost anyone. Presidential hopefuls on both sides of the aisle have told personal stories about the terrible toll this epidemic has taken on family, friends, and colleagues, and some have proposed detailed policies to address prevention and treatment of abuse.
NEWS
February 3, 2016
ISSUE | BLIZZARD OF 2016 Turnpike should have been closed Behind the chaos of 500 motorists stranded on the Pennsylvania Turnpike for 24 hours in last month's blizzard is a fundamental question: Why did otherwise intelligent people put their lives at risk ("On turnpike, a blizzard of questions," Sunday)? Why did universities and businesses send their students and employees into the dangerous storm? And why did the Turnpike Commission not close the highway? Washington closed its Metro system from Friday evening through Sunday night.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|