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Substance Abuse

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September 8, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Charles White of the Los Angeles Rams, the NFL's leading rusher last season, and a pair of Chicago Bears, star defensive end Richard Dent and running back Calvin Thomas, were suspended by the league for 30 days yesterday for violating its substance-abuse policy. All three must stay out of their teams' training facilities until Oct. 7, a league spokesman said. In all, 17 players have been suspended this year for violating the league's policy. Rams coach John Robinson said the substance found in White's test was alcohol.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Board of Education has decided to begin a Student Assistance Program to provide counseling for students with drug- or alcohol-abuse problems. Starting in September, students will be able to seek help, on a confidential basis for the first time, from counselors at the schools. The high school will have a walk-in office set up specifically to deal with student problems. The board unanimously endorsed the program at a work session last night. Marsha Mark, a school social worker, will become coordinator of the program.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Prevention is the goal of the Rancocas Community Aligned for Substance Awareness (R-CASA) - a municipal alliance that will target various age groups during the coming year in a fight against alcohol and drug abuse, according to Anne Moore, chairwoman of the group. The townships of Mount Holly and Westampton have agreed to join forces and funding in the alliance to "make the group have a bigger impact on these efforts in the area," Moore said. The alliance is hoping to attract participation from other municipalities, Moore said.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The overhaul of New Jersey's child-welfare system includes far-reaching improvements in health care, according to a draft of the state's plan. Under part of the plan, obtained yesterday by The Inquirer, the number of families getting substance-abuse treatment would triple, the number of nurses on staff would more than double, and children living in adoptive and foster homes would be enrolled in HMOs. Funding for programs dealing with substance abuse - suspected to play a role in as many as four of every five Division of Youth and Family Services cases - would triple to almost $90 million a year.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Six months into the Affordable Care Act, local mental-health and substance-abuse professionals have yet to see an uptick in clients using their new benefits. The seeming lack of interest has been disappointing for caregivers, but is not completely unexpected. "It's very early," said Patricia Kleven, director of outpatient mental health services at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment. "I don't know what it will look like in six months or a year. But at the moment, not so much.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By John McDonough, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill Board of Education on Monday approved a staff program on drug and alchohol abuse. The five-hour seminar, to be held sometime in March, is designed to heighten district employees' awareness of substance abuse in the schools. Robert W. Ferris, assistant superintendent of schools, said the session was part of a program started in 1984. "In the summer of 1984 we developed a pilot project to assist with the development of substance-abuse services," Ferris said.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking the stance that any degree of substance abuse is unacceptable, the Upper Dublin Select Joint Committee on Teenage Alcohol Abuse has outlined a series of recommendations to combat the growing problem. The committee presented the results of its summer-long study of teen substance abuse in Upper Dublin to the township commissioners and school board Thursday night. About 30 members of the public attended. "There is a serious and growing problem, and it is not only teen alcohol abuse, but substance abuse," said Leonard Ross, chairman of the committee.
NEWS
October 27, 2004 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Incidents of violence, vandalism and substance abuse are down in Cherry Hill's public schools, according to a report released by the district yesterday. For the 2003-04 school year, there were 87 reported episodes, a 16 percent drop from the previous year's 104. "The report is somewhat encouraging," said Michael Nuzzo, the district's director of security. The drop in violence and vandalism comes despite a steadily growing student population. Cherry Hill has about 11,700 students this school year.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday, Philadelphia public school students will have a day off while their teachers, principals and parents discuss one of the most disheartening and pervasive problems facing students and schools - substance abuse. The all-day program is the third annual "instructional review day," inaugurated in 1987 for teachers and administrators in each school to get together and brainstorm for a day on a crucial issue. This year, for the first time, parents have been invited as well.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Austen's beauty Jane Austen did not look like a runway model. No Heidi Klum- ia   n legs or Marilyn Monroe -esque bust adorned the author of Emma . No heavenly, Ingrid Bergman- ian visage. According to a new wax figure unveiled this week at the Jane Austen Centre in the British city of Bath, Ms. Austen looked rather average. This is the closest "anyone has come to the real Jane Austen for 200 years," a Centre rep says, according to People. The wax effigy was created thanks to detailed studies conducted by FBI forensic artist Melissa Dring , who says she's not a big fan of the only other image of the author that has survived, an 1810 sketch made by Austen's sis Cassandra . "[It]
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Six months into the Affordable Care Act, local mental-health and substance-abuse professionals have yet to see an uptick in clients using their new benefits. The seeming lack of interest has been disappointing for caregivers, but is not completely unexpected. "It's very early," said Patricia Kleven, director of outpatient mental health services at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment. "I don't know what it will look like in six months or a year. But at the moment, not so much.
NEWS
January 22, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
With same-sex marriage on the rise nationwide and celebrities coming out all over the place, one might suppose that young gay men's lives have become "easy, breezy, and free," says Jerome T. Pipes. This seems particularly true when compared with my own youthful emergence from the closet, back in the day when dinosaurs ruled the Earth. But what if a young gay man coming out in 2014 is African American or Latino and lives in Camden? Out come the stereotypes - particularly, but not exclusively, among outsiders.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
DO ME A FAVOR: After you finish this column, spend the day keeping track of how many homeless people you see. Look at the man huddled in the corner in the concourse between Suburban Station and City Hall. Look at the frail young man rocking back and forth on the cold pavement outside the Dunkin' Donuts on Market Street. Look at the woman with a toddler holding out a paper cup for spare change on Walnut. And then ask yourself: How is it that we, a civilized society with great minds and deep pockets, still have people living and dying on the streets?
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Rita Giordano and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON Incidents of violence, vandalism, weapons possession, and substance abuse in New Jersey's public schools saw an overall decrease in 2012-13 from the previous school year, according to an annual report released Thursday by state education officials. In addition, the number of incidents of harassment, intimidation, and bullying reported by districts decreased last school year by nearly 4,300, or 36 percent. While some of that decline may be due to bullying-prevention programs, state officials said part of the drop is the result of the Department of Education's working with local districts over the last two years to get a better understanding of the criteria for reporting bullying.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
On a single night in January 2011, 67,495 veterans were homeless in the United States. This is unacceptable. Veterans who have honorably served our country should have a safe, secure place to call home. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) aims to end veterans' homelessness by 2015. VA needs our help to meet this ambitious goal. Much is being done. Homeless veterans and those at risk of homelessness should gain access to VA services. Know the facts.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
If the Affordable Care Act is widely implemented, many groups will be affected. Here's a sampling.   Mental health People with mental illness may be among those who benefit the most from the law. These include individuals with severe mental illness, who make up about 6 percent of the population, but also those with milder or temporary issues. All new marketplace plans must offer 10 essential health benefits, and mental health is a core area. Future coverage will include such services as counseling and psychotherapy, and insurers must cover them at levels similar to general medical and surgical care.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
The word pediatrician conjures up Norman Rockwell-like images of a doctor listening to the heart of a child's doll. We tend to be a happy crew: treating newborns with unlimited potential, struggling with teens as they figure out who they are. That's the good stuff. But there's a darker side of pediatrics. It rears up when a child removes his shirt for an exam and has telltale bruises. Or when a child flinches each time a parent moves suddenly. Recently, as I was preparing for patients, I noticed a consult report on an 8-year-old boy whom I have been caring for since birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | Cpompiled by The Inquirer Staff
Once upon a time, there was a time before Wi-Fi - or even the Net. They did have TVs back then. Even sitcoms. And sitcom stars. Robin Williams , 62, was a TV star way back then, when there was no Internet. This fall, he'll return to network TV in David E. Kelley 's The Crazy Ones on CBS. It's been so long, the Mork and Mindy alumnus says, "the last time I was on TV, wired meant a gram and a bottle of Jack Daniel's. " (Williams famously battled substance abuse problems back then, in the olden times.)
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Andrew Kitchenman, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey residents are being wrongly denied insurance for inpatient treatment for substance abuse and mental illnesses, forcing them to choose between paying for expensive care or being put on the streets, a group of patients, family members, and health-care providers told a legislative committee Thursday. The group told the Senate Legislative Oversight Committee that the state should take a more active role in advocating for patients, saying that those with behavioral or substance-abuse issues aren't treated the same as those with physical ailments.
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