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Substance Abuse

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September 8, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Charles White of the Los Angeles Rams, the NFL's leading rusher last season, and a pair of Chicago Bears, star defensive end Richard Dent and running back Calvin Thomas, were suspended by the league for 30 days yesterday for violating its substance-abuse policy. All three must stay out of their teams' training facilities until Oct. 7, a league spokesman said. In all, 17 players have been suspended this year for violating the league's policy. Rams coach John Robinson said the substance found in White's test was alcohol.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Board of Education has decided to begin a Student Assistance Program to provide counseling for students with drug- or alcohol-abuse problems. Starting in September, students will be able to seek help, on a confidential basis for the first time, from counselors at the schools. The high school will have a walk-in office set up specifically to deal with student problems. The board unanimously endorsed the program at a work session last night. Marsha Mark, a school social worker, will become coordinator of the program.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Prevention is the goal of the Rancocas Community Aligned for Substance Awareness (R-CASA) - a municipal alliance that will target various age groups during the coming year in a fight against alcohol and drug abuse, according to Anne Moore, chairwoman of the group. The townships of Mount Holly and Westampton have agreed to join forces and funding in the alliance to "make the group have a bigger impact on these efforts in the area," Moore said. The alliance is hoping to attract participation from other municipalities, Moore said.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The overhaul of New Jersey's child-welfare system includes far-reaching improvements in health care, according to a draft of the state's plan. Under part of the plan, obtained yesterday by The Inquirer, the number of families getting substance-abuse treatment would triple, the number of nurses on staff would more than double, and children living in adoptive and foster homes would be enrolled in HMOs. Funding for programs dealing with substance abuse - suspected to play a role in as many as four of every five Division of Youth and Family Services cases - would triple to almost $90 million a year.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By John McDonough, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill Board of Education on Monday approved a staff program on drug and alchohol abuse. The five-hour seminar, to be held sometime in March, is designed to heighten district employees' awareness of substance abuse in the schools. Robert W. Ferris, assistant superintendent of schools, said the session was part of a program started in 1984. "In the summer of 1984 we developed a pilot project to assist with the development of substance-abuse services," Ferris said.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking the stance that any degree of substance abuse is unacceptable, the Upper Dublin Select Joint Committee on Teenage Alcohol Abuse has outlined a series of recommendations to combat the growing problem. The committee presented the results of its summer-long study of teen substance abuse in Upper Dublin to the township commissioners and school board Thursday night. About 30 members of the public attended. "There is a serious and growing problem, and it is not only teen alcohol abuse, but substance abuse," said Leonard Ross, chairman of the committee.
NEWS
October 27, 2004 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Incidents of violence, vandalism and substance abuse are down in Cherry Hill's public schools, according to a report released by the district yesterday. For the 2003-04 school year, there were 87 reported episodes, a 16 percent drop from the previous year's 104. "The report is somewhat encouraging," said Michael Nuzzo, the district's director of security. The drop in violence and vandalism comes despite a steadily growing student population. Cherry Hill has about 11,700 students this school year.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Six months into the Affordable Care Act, local mental-health and substance-abuse professionals have yet to see an uptick in clients using their new benefits. The seeming lack of interest has been disappointing for caregivers, but is not completely unexpected. "It's very early," said Patricia Kleven, director of outpatient mental health services at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment. "I don't know what it will look like in six months or a year. But at the moment, not so much.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday, Philadelphia public school students will have a day off while their teachers, principals and parents discuss one of the most disheartening and pervasive problems facing students and schools - substance abuse. The all-day program is the third annual "instructional review day," inaugurated in 1987 for teachers and administrators in each school to get together and brainstorm for a day on a crucial issue. This year, for the first time, parents have been invited as well.
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NEWS
February 4, 2016
By Cynthia Reilly In a political climate in which the two major parties don't always see eye to eye, one issue is bringing them together: Republicans and Democrats agree that we must address the tragedy of prescription drug abuse. With 44 people dying every day from overdoses of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and similar opioid pain relievers, there is growing awareness that misuse of these drugs can affect almost anyone. Presidential hopefuls on both sides of the aisle have told personal stories about the terrible toll this epidemic has taken on family, friends, and colleagues, and some have proposed detailed policies to address prevention and treatment of abuse.
NEWS
February 3, 2016
ISSUE | BLIZZARD OF 2016 Turnpike should have been closed Behind the chaos of 500 motorists stranded on the Pennsylvania Turnpike for 24 hours in last month's blizzard is a fundamental question: Why did otherwise intelligent people put their lives at risk ("On turnpike, a blizzard of questions," Sunday)? Why did universities and businesses send their students and employees into the dangerous storm? And why did the Turnpike Commission not close the highway? Washington closed its Metro system from Friday evening through Sunday night.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Don't blame suicide and substance abuse entirely for rising death rates among middle-aged white Americans, asserts a new study out Friday. They're both factors, but the bigger culprit is almost two decades of stalled progress in fighting leading causes of death - such as heart disease, diabetes, and respiratory disease - according to a Commonwealth Fund analysis of data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The fund studied actual and expected death rates, and causes of death, for working-age adults from 1968 through 2014.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Brian O'Neill's plate was already full in 2011 when an assistant interrupted a meeting to ask whether he'd take a phone call from the wife of a high school friend. The King of Prussia-based developer was enmeshed in the financial crisis, trying to work himself out of a hole that included being ordered to repay $64 million in loans for a pair of local projects. But he didn't hesitate to take the call. That's when he learned that "Francis" had just bottomed out. His 52-year-old friend had been on an alcohol- and drug-induced downward spiral for several years.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Officially, Friday was a holiday for state employees. But for Loren Robinson, Pennsylvania's deputy secretary for health promotion and disease prevention, that just meant working a double shift. Robinson, 34, moonlights as an overnight physician at Abington-Lansdale Hospital. And, as has been her tradition for a decade, it was a hospital Christmas: She worked from 7 a.m. to 7 a.m., with a six-hour break for a nap and a plate of cafeteria turkey and mashed potatoes. The way the South Philadelphia resident sees it, it's the best and highest use of her holiday.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Katie McGinty
I have seen firsthand the destruction of addiction. Alcoholism has hit my family, close friends, and relatives, causing heartbreak and snatching away lives, relationships, and careers. My family and I aren't alone. An addiction epidemic is taking hold throughout Pennsylvania and the country as more people are turning from prescribed painkillers to the cheaper alternative of heroin. Pennsylvania has moved from 14th to ninth among the states in drug overdose deaths per capita. Recent headlines highlighted the horrific reality that young men in Bucks County are dying from overdoses at a greater rate than anywhere in the country.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By H. Jean Wright II, For The Inquirer
Knowing the difference between typical adolescent behavior and behavior that should be cause for concern can be difficult to assess for parents, other family members, and those who care for our youth. If you are a parent or youth caregiver, you are likely all too familiar with the ups and downs of adolescents - frequent changes in emotions, withdrawing from family, testing limits, and the need for more privacy. Most youths pass through adolescence with relatively little difficulty.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER AND BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ANTHONY RILEY could make almost anyone feel good. You. The girl you're trying to impress. A national TV audience. Our whole grouchy city. The 28-year-old Philadelphia street performer got his big break this year on NBC's "The Voice" by belting out James Brown's "I Got You (I Feel Good). " Within seconds, all four judges were feeling good, too, slamming the red buttons that spin their chairs around and signal their approval. Riley instantly became a crowd favorite. He was being coached by Pharrell Williams and poised to take the next step.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Riley, 28, a Philadelphia street performer who left NBC's singing-competition show The Voice in January to deal with substance-abuse issues, was found dead Friday. Over the last decade, Mr. Riley had been a fixture in Center City, crooning Motown and pop songs for tips on the bustling streets outside Reading Terminal Market, Penn's Landing, and Independence Hall. Since leaving the TV show, he had been working on an album but continued to struggle with addiction, his friends and family said Saturday.
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