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Substance Abuse

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September 8, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Charles White of the Los Angeles Rams, the NFL's leading rusher last season, and a pair of Chicago Bears, star defensive end Richard Dent and running back Calvin Thomas, were suspended by the league for 30 days yesterday for violating its substance-abuse policy. All three must stay out of their teams' training facilities until Oct. 7, a league spokesman said. In all, 17 players have been suspended this year for violating the league's policy. Rams coach John Robinson said the substance found in White's test was alcohol.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Board of Education has decided to begin a Student Assistance Program to provide counseling for students with drug- or alcohol-abuse problems. Starting in September, students will be able to seek help, on a confidential basis for the first time, from counselors at the schools. The high school will have a walk-in office set up specifically to deal with student problems. The board unanimously endorsed the program at a work session last night. Marsha Mark, a school social worker, will become coordinator of the program.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Prevention is the goal of the Rancocas Community Aligned for Substance Awareness (R-CASA) - a municipal alliance that will target various age groups during the coming year in a fight against alcohol and drug abuse, according to Anne Moore, chairwoman of the group. The townships of Mount Holly and Westampton have agreed to join forces and funding in the alliance to "make the group have a bigger impact on these efforts in the area," Moore said. The alliance is hoping to attract participation from other municipalities, Moore said.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The overhaul of New Jersey's child-welfare system includes far-reaching improvements in health care, according to a draft of the state's plan. Under part of the plan, obtained yesterday by The Inquirer, the number of families getting substance-abuse treatment would triple, the number of nurses on staff would more than double, and children living in adoptive and foster homes would be enrolled in HMOs. Funding for programs dealing with substance abuse - suspected to play a role in as many as four of every five Division of Youth and Family Services cases - would triple to almost $90 million a year.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By John McDonough, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill Board of Education on Monday approved a staff program on drug and alchohol abuse. The five-hour seminar, to be held sometime in March, is designed to heighten district employees' awareness of substance abuse in the schools. Robert W. Ferris, assistant superintendent of schools, said the session was part of a program started in 1984. "In the summer of 1984 we developed a pilot project to assist with the development of substance-abuse services," Ferris said.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking the stance that any degree of substance abuse is unacceptable, the Upper Dublin Select Joint Committee on Teenage Alcohol Abuse has outlined a series of recommendations to combat the growing problem. The committee presented the results of its summer-long study of teen substance abuse in Upper Dublin to the township commissioners and school board Thursday night. About 30 members of the public attended. "There is a serious and growing problem, and it is not only teen alcohol abuse, but substance abuse," said Leonard Ross, chairman of the committee.
NEWS
October 27, 2004 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Incidents of violence, vandalism and substance abuse are down in Cherry Hill's public schools, according to a report released by the district yesterday. For the 2003-04 school year, there were 87 reported episodes, a 16 percent drop from the previous year's 104. "The report is somewhat encouraging," said Michael Nuzzo, the district's director of security. The drop in violence and vandalism comes despite a steadily growing student population. Cherry Hill has about 11,700 students this school year.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Six months into the Affordable Care Act, local mental-health and substance-abuse professionals have yet to see an uptick in clients using their new benefits. The seeming lack of interest has been disappointing for caregivers, but is not completely unexpected. "It's very early," said Patricia Kleven, director of outpatient mental health services at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment. "I don't know what it will look like in six months or a year. But at the moment, not so much.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday, Philadelphia public school students will have a day off while their teachers, principals and parents discuss one of the most disheartening and pervasive problems facing students and schools - substance abuse. The all-day program is the third annual "instructional review day," inaugurated in 1987 for teachers and administrators in each school to get together and brainstorm for a day on a crucial issue. This year, for the first time, parents have been invited as well.
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NEWS
June 9, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER AND BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ANTHONY RILEY could make almost anyone feel good. You. The girl you're trying to impress. A national TV audience. Our whole grouchy city. The 28-year-old Philadelphia street performer got his big break this year on NBC's "The Voice" by belting out James Brown's "I Got You (I Feel Good). " Within seconds, all four judges were feeling good, too, slamming the red buttons that spin their chairs around and signal their approval. Riley instantly became a crowd favorite. He was being coached by Pharrell Williams and poised to take the next step.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Riley, 28, a Philadelphia street performer who left NBC's singing-competition show The Voice in January to deal with substance-abuse issues, was found dead Friday. Over the last decade, Mr. Riley had been a fixture in Center City, crooning Motown and pop songs for tips on the bustling streets outside Reading Terminal Market, Penn's Landing, and Independence Hall. Since leaving the TV show, he had been working on an album but continued to struggle with addiction, his friends and family said Saturday.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly street performer Anthony Riley made history on The Voice when he received the TV show's fastest four-chair turn-around ever from the judges after an impassioned performance of James Brown's "I Got You (I Feel Good). " But on Monday's show, judge Pharrell Williams announced that Riley had left The Voice for personal reasons. Philly.com reported that Riley's departure was due to substance-abuse issues. Now, Riley is opening up about the problems that have plagued him. The 28-year-old said he struggled with drug addiction for two years, but since leaving The Voice has completed a rehabilitation program.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
HE SAT for hours, handcuffed with his head hanging low, at the defense table. When he finally spoke, he told the judge he was ashamed, owned his wrongdoing and vowed to make restitution, even if it took him decades. But when deputies led disgraced ex-sportscaster Don Tollefson away to begin a two- to four-year sentence in state prison for fleecing $342,643 from 200 people (most of whom were donors to his charities), many of his victims in attendance trudged out of court scowling with disgust.
NEWS
March 8, 2015
A story and headline Thursday on Pennsylvania Medicaid expansion plans incorrectly said that Ted Dallas, acting secretary of the state Department of Human Services, expected to complete the transition from Gov. Tom Corbett's version to Gov. Wolf's version by the end of April. Kait Gillis, a spokeswoman for the department, said Dallas was referring only to the first phase of the transition, involving coverage for substance abuse and mental health treatment. She said the full transition was expected to be finished by Sept.
NEWS
February 4, 2015
HAVE YOU EVER bought anything just because of a Super Bowl commercial? (Me neither.) Someone must. Advertisers pay more than $4 million for a 30-second spot and feel they're getting their money's worth if it gets people talking - even if they're bad-mouthing it. "If you haven't got anything nice to say about anybody," said Alice Roosevelt Longworth, "come sit next to me. " No one sits to bad mouth any more. They tweet and Facebook. In Sunday's Downer Bowl - with commercials about domestic abuse, bullying and death - viewers were not on the side of Nationwide.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
PEOPLE battling drug and alcohol addiction in Philadelphia are watching Hollywood movies in outpatient group therapy - on your dime.   The tab can exceed $50 a person for each movie, paid by Medicaid. Clients said that some of the movies they saw - like "Caddyshack" and "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" - had nothing to do with recovery. The films that did depict addiction, including "The Basketball Diaries," starring Leonardo DiCaprio as a heroin addict, and "28 Days," with Sandra Bullock in the throes of alcoholism, made them crave the very substance they are trying to kick, they said.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Around lunchtime on a warm day last week, a gray van pulled to the side of a wooded road in Browns Mills and honked three times. The silent woods seemed empty. Then, a figure in a hooded black sweatshirt peered out from the autumn foliage. To the right, a man in a canvas jacket seemed to rise out of the ground. His quizzical scowl softened when he saw the van, and he turned and shouted something behind him. In moments, shabbily dressed men in groups of two and three were filing up a narrow path barely visible from the road.
SPORTS
October 27, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Since football, or more precisely football-viewing, is overwhelmingly the favorite pastime of 21st-century Americans, it's no surprise that it too has become a polarizing subject. Those who love the sport subscribe to a heroic narrative: It's a colorful, compelling, athletic spectacle, one whose participants embody the virtues of teamwork, strength, and dedication. Others see football as a militaristic farce. Its coaches are egomaniacal martinets. Its players are incurious lemmings.
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