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Substance Abuse

NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Frank Reeves, Special to The Inquirer
After a three-month investigation, Haverford officials met behind closed doors Tuesday to discuss whether disciplinary action should be taken against Charles T. Held, director of the Department of Codes Enforcement, who has been accused of being drunk when he participated in a Planning Commission meeting in February. "A decision was made. That's my statement. Nothing more," township manager Thomas J. Banner said after the meeting of the Board of Commissioners. Neither Banner nor other officials would say what the decision was. Held could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Brian McVan registered for a workshop at yesterday's Youth Leadership Conference titled "Everyone's Not Doing It," he expected to hear a hackneyed lesson about how destructive drug and alcohol abuse are. Instead, the 11th grader at Archbishop Wood High School in Warminster got an eye-opening firsthand account by three area teenagers of how their recreational drug use had led to dependency before they entered rehabilitation. The teens, residents of Today Inc., a Newtown substance-abuse rehabilitation center, described the sometimes-harrowing road of substance abuse.
SPORTS
November 17, 1990 | By Mike Freeman, The Washington Post Inquirer staff writer Dave Caldwell contributed to this article
Dexter Manley, the suspended Washington Redskins defensive lineman, met for more than an hour yesterday with NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue to plead his case for rejoining the league, and sources said afterward that he probably will be reinstated on Monday. NFL sources indicated that Manley - who tested positive for cocaine use last November and subsequently was barred "for life" as a three-time offender under the league's substance-abuse policy - had a positive conversation with Tagliabue.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brian, a spindly 17-year-old Middletown, N.J., youth with steely blue eyes, shook his head, expelled a deep sigh and stared at the polished pine conference table where he sat recalling how crack cocaine wiped out a year of his life. His deepest regret? Completely losing control of himself. Once, he even stole his parents' gold wedding bands and pawned them in New York for $40 and a 10-minute high. Shawn, 29, an Upper Darby union carpenter and the son of a police officer, had a $300-per-day habit.
NEWS
November 21, 1999
Tell us of your family's experience with drug or alcohol abuse. Where did you go for help - the medical community, religious or social organizations, government programs? What was the result? What would you like to see available for others in a similar situation? Send essays of 300 words by Dec. 6 to Community Voices/Substance Abuse, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia 19101. Send faxes to 215-854-4483, and e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-4543.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Substance abuse among older adults is sometimes called the "hidden epidemic," even though it's not so easy to hide and is never contagious. But it is spreading, according to Kim P. Bowman, director of the Chester County Department of Drug and Alcohol Services. Bowman said a federal survey of drug abuse in 2001 estimated that as the baby boomer generation matures, the number of older adults needing substance abuse treatment will triple from 1.7 million to 4.4 million by 2020.
SPORTS
January 23, 1989 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
The Bengals' day began with a terrible jolt. Running back Stanley Wilson, who has been to drug rehab five different times in his life and has missed two entire seasons (1985 and '87) because of drug suspensions, was suspended again by the NFL for a violation of the NFL's substance-abuse policy and missed Super Bowl XXIII. The bombshell came in the form of a morning press release from the league. It read, in its entirety: "Stanley Wilson of the Cincinnati Bengals will be ineligible to play in Super Bowl XXIII due to a violation of the NFL's substance-abuse policy.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The efforts of Paoli Memorial Hospital and Great Valley School District to spearhead community-wide action to combat drug and alcohol use in the school district have prompted a four-part series titled "Drugs and Alcohol - Who Will Help Me?" Produced by Harron Cable, the series will be aired on Harron at 8 p.m. Tuesdays from now until June 3 (the first part aired this past Tuesday) and again on Suburban Cable, at 6:30 p.m. Thursdays from June 19 to July 10. The series features interviews with addiction counselors and treatment providers, teenagers recovering from addiction, police officers, and Great Valley students discussing community-wide solutions to substance abuse.
SPORTS
December 30, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Anaheim Mighty Ducks defenseman Sandis Ozolinsh has voluntarily entered a substance abuse program, the NHL and the players union announced yesterday. Ozolinsh, 33, has been out since Nov. 27 with a knee injury. He has one goal and three assists in 13 games. Doctors Brian Shaw, of the NHLPA, and Dave Lewis, of the NHL, will oversee Ozolinsh's care in the substance abuse and behavioral health program administered by the league and the union. "The Mighty Ducks ownership, management, coaches and players are wholeheartedly behind Sandis and his family during this time and support his decision to seek professional help," Anaheim general manager Brian Burke said.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
By Jennifer Coburn This holiday season, let's not overstuff ourselves with toys, trinkets, and gifts. The gluttony of consumerism adversely affects our health and our children's health. The average American spends more than $1,000 during the holiday season, according to Buy Nothing Christmas, an organization that advocates simplifying the holiday. Although the United States represents only 4.5 percent of the world's population, we consume 40 percent of its toys. The typical first grader is able to recognize 200 brands and acquires 70 new toys a year.
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