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Substitute Teacher

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NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Lang Jr. may have been dishelved, unkempt, poorly organized and unable to control or discipline the fifth-grade class he was called in to teach in Camden in February 1988, but those are not crimes, his defense attorney said yesterday. Lang, 39, of Lansdale, Montgomery County, is charged with aggravated sexual assualt on a child, which carries a maximum sentence of 10 years, and 27 counts of endangering the welfare of a child, each of which carries a maximum sentence of five years.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Monica Peters, FOR THE INQUIRER
Walnut Street Theatre presents the stage production of Miss Nelson Is Missing, a musical based on the children's book by author Harry Allard. The disobedient students of Room 207, the worst-behaved class in the school, take advantage of their teacher, Miss Nelson. However, when witchy teacher Viola Swamp comes in as a substitute the students regret their behavior and wish for Miss Nelson to return. Will these unruly kids be stuck with their horrible substitute forever? Miss Nelson Is Missing, 10:30 a.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m., 1 and 3:30 p.m. Saturday through April 20 at Walnut Street Theatre, 825 Walnut St. Tickets: $10-$20.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
A substitute teacher has been charged with sexually assaulting a 9-year-old special-education student in a bathroom at Union Terrace Elementary School in Allentown, Lehigh County District Attorney Jim Martin said. Michael James Agrippine, 47, of Upper Saucon Township, was charged with aggravated indecent assault, institutional sexual assault, and indecent assault. According to the arrest affidavit, filed Wednesday, Agrippine acknowledged being in a bathroom stall with the victim, a boy, caressing him from behind, and penetrating him with a finger.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Mascaro Ferri, 78, a former teacher of public school and church classes, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure in the health-care facility of the Twining Village Retirement Community, Holland. Mrs. Ferri had been a substitute teacher for the Bensalem School District for seven years. She taught Bible studies for 10 years for the women's circle of Northampton Presbyterian Church in Holland, and before that taught at the Bristol Assembly of God, where she served as Sunday school superintendent.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Christopher B. Daly, Washington Post Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A man who burned himself to death on the Amherst town common in an apparent protest against the Persian Gulf war was identified yesterday as Gregory D. Levey, 30, a substitute teacher. Authorities said Levey acted alone when he doused himself with two gallons of paint thinner and set himself ablaze Monday afternoon in a protest that horrified onlookers in the center of Amherst, a university town of about 35,000 residents about 75 miles west of Boston. Levey was the son of Robert Levey, Boston Globe restaurant critic, and the stepson of Ellen Goodman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Globe.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia substitute teacher Mohammed Abdo said two girls retaliated against his scoldings by making up claims that he kissed and fondled them. "I swear to Allah that I'm innocent," he said through a translator in court yesterday. "I would never have done such a thing. " Family Court Judge Tama Myers Clark found him guilty anyway. Abdo, 53, was convicted of two counts each of corrupting the morals of a minor, indecent assault and simple assault. He faces a maximum prison term ranging from one to five years when he is sentenced July 31. The mother of Heather Ackurman, the 10-year-old girl who accused Abdo of hugging her and rubbing her genitals, said she was relieved by the verdict.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | By Dianne Herrin, Special to The Inquirer
Armed only with her experience and wit, substitute teacher Jane Varnes must encounter unknown challenges each day at Octorara Intermediate School. "My friend John tried to sit with me today, and Mrs. Varnes wouldn't let him," said 12-year-old Bobby Hilton, one of the seventh graders she taught for a day on Sept. 25. "He tried to make up an excuse that he forgot his glasses, and he said he had to (sit there so he could) see the blackboard. " It didn't work. "She's strict," said Bobby's classmate Mike Byczkowski, 12. On every schoolday, substitute teachers are working in Chester County public schools, usually earning $50 to $60 per day. Daily substitutes working in the Octorara and Unionville-Chadds Ford school districts have the opportunity to earn more because those districts offer a graduated pay scale.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A PHILADELPHIA substitute teacher was awarded back pay and interest after filing a complaint that he was discriminated against because he is from Kenya, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission said yesterday. The commission ordered K-12 Staffing of Philadelphia to pay Paul Musumba $1,573. Musumba alleged that the company failed to pay him for 17 of the 27 days he worked as a substitute teacher for the vendor in September and October 2011, the commission said in a news release.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge has acquitted a Philadelphia substitute teacher on drug charges in a case authorities said marked the first appearance of "brown heroin" in the city in years. After hearing the prosecution's evidence, Judge James T. Giles on Wednesday acquitted Patrick Nweze, preventing the case from going to the jury. However, the jury did continue hearing evidence on Nweze's nephew, Sunday Obialo, and yesterday convicted him of conspiracy to distribute heroin. Sentencing for Obialo, of Griscom Street near Orthodox in Frankford, was set for June 16. Nweze was arrested in a raid on his house on Hawthorne Street near Wakeling in Frankford Aug. 5. Police said that in Nweze's basement, they found brown heroin, worth more than $500,000, in the covers of four textbooks.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Those perfect spring Fridays - cerulean skies, temperatures in the 70s - are exactly the kind of days that Dan Nerelli has come to dread. That's because Nerelli, assistant superintendent for personnel in the Upper Darby School District, knows he'll be scrambling to put substitutes in dozens of teacher-less classrooms. The Delaware County district's ability to cover faculty absences has plunged from 95 percent just a few years ago to roughly 60 percent. Philadelphia-area school administrators such as Nerelli now struggle to find ways to cope with a shortage of substitutes unlike anything they have ever faced.
SPORTS
March 8, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Brock Stassi - prospective Phillies first baseman, 2015 Eastern League most valuable player, former substitute teacher - took batting practice Sunday morning and made everyone in the ballpark stop to watch. Once, twice, and then a third time, bench coach Larry Bowa grooved a pitch to Stassi hours before the Phillies' 6-5 victory over the Yankees at Bright House Field, and Stassi lined each one over the right-field fence. That he hit three home runs on three consecutive pitches demanded that, at least for a moment, people pay him attention.
NEWS
February 11, 2016
A substitute teacher at Gloucester City High School has been charged with sexual assault of a student at the school, prosecutors said Tuesday. David H. Light, 32, of Gloucester City, is also a softball coach at the school, according to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. He faces four counts of sexual assault for allegedly having "a sexual relationship" with a 17-year-old girl from May to December 2008, the prosecutor's office said in a statement. He was arrested Friday and bail was set at $200,000.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AS PRESSURE MOUNTS on Philadelphia School District officials to dump the firm responsible for hiring substitute teachers, details of the agreement have been revealed. Source4Teachers, the Cherry Hill, N.J.-based firm contracted in June, was required to staff 75 percent of vacant classrooms by the first day of school, but the firm has fallen well short of that, hovering around 20 percent daily over the first seven weeks. According to the contract, a copy of which was obtained and published online by the Public School Notebook , the district can terminate the deal with or without cause with 14 days' prior written notice to the company and not incur any penalty.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The firm hired to staff Philadelphia classrooms with substitute teachers has been put on notice: "Continued poor performance puts this partnership in jeopardy," Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said Thursday night. Source4Teachers was awarded a $34 million contract to provide substitutes, promising it would fill 75 percent of vacancies on the first day of school. It has done no better than about 15 percent to date. School Reform Commission Chair Marjorie Neff also said the Cherry Hill company's work "has been unacceptable," and said the SRC took full responsibility for its vote to approve the contract.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ONLY SIX DAYS into the school year, the School District of Philadelphia is re-evaluating its decision to overhaul the management of substitute teachers. Superintendent William Hite last night said he was disappointed with the performance of Source4Teachers, the company hired in June to recruit and manage subs, since schools opened Sept. 8. The firm has filled fewer than 25 percent of empty classrooms so far, leaving many kids and teachers in the lurch. Hite said the district is working with the Cherry Hill-based firm to increase the so-called fill rate by increasing pay, adding more recruiters and streamlining the hiring process.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Lincoln High never had trouble finding subs. Even though it is a large, comprehensive high school, temporary teachers wanted to work there. That changed last week, when a private firm took over managing the Philadelphia School District's substitute services. Source4Teachers, based in Cherry Hill, received a $34 million contract and promised it would fill 75 percent of vacancies initially, ramping up to 90 percent by January. But Source4Teachers achieved its highest "fill rate" of the week on Friday, when just 12 percent of the 456 city classrooms that needed substitute services had them.
NEWS
September 1, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The firm hired to staff Philadelphia School District substitute-teaching jobs has a pressing need: hiring 5,000 qualified people, as soon as possible. To achieve that goal, prepare for an onslaught of advertising - billboards on I-95, posters in train stations and other high-visibility areas - trolling for people looking for "flexible and fulfilling part-time work in education. " When a Cherry Hill-based firm recently hired by the district won the $34 million contract to fill sub jobs, it promised it would staff 90 percent of all openings by January.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Morton Botel, 90, of Philadelphia, an educator in the field of literacy who profoundly changed how reading and writing are taught to children in America, died Monday, July 6, of pneumonia and other causes at St. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. At the time of his death, he was visiting relatives in Ireland, a country he had grown to love, according to a death notice in the Irish Times. Dr. Botel was affiliated for many years with the University of Pennsylvania, first as an undergraduate student in 1942, then as a master's and doctoral student, and later as professor and professor emeritus of education at Penn's Graduate School of Education.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inez Sullivan Jackson, 82, a longtime Philadelphia schoolteacher and advocate for children, died at her North Philadelphia home Friday, June 19, of natural causes. Ms. Jackson was highly regarded by students she taught during her decades-long career in the Philadelphia School District. Some of her former students spoke at her funeral, Najah Jackson said, calling her grandmother an example "of what a teacher should be. " After working as a substitute teacher, she received her master of education degree from Temple University in 1977.
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