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Substitute Teacher

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NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Lang Jr. may have been dishelved, unkempt, poorly organized and unable to control or discipline the fifth-grade class he was called in to teach in Camden in February 1988, but those are not crimes, his defense attorney said yesterday. Lang, 39, of Lansdale, Montgomery County, is charged with aggravated sexual assualt on a child, which carries a maximum sentence of 10 years, and 27 counts of endangering the welfare of a child, each of which carries a maximum sentence of five years.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Monica Peters, FOR THE INQUIRER
Walnut Street Theatre presents the stage production of Miss Nelson Is Missing, a musical based on the children's book by author Harry Allard. The disobedient students of Room 207, the worst-behaved class in the school, take advantage of their teacher, Miss Nelson. However, when witchy teacher Viola Swamp comes in as a substitute the students regret their behavior and wish for Miss Nelson to return. Will these unruly kids be stuck with their horrible substitute forever? Miss Nelson Is Missing, 10:30 a.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m., 1 and 3:30 p.m. Saturday through April 20 at Walnut Street Theatre, 825 Walnut St. Tickets: $10-$20.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
A substitute teacher has been charged with sexually assaulting a 9-year-old special-education student in a bathroom at Union Terrace Elementary School in Allentown, Lehigh County District Attorney Jim Martin said. Michael James Agrippine, 47, of Upper Saucon Township, was charged with aggravated indecent assault, institutional sexual assault, and indecent assault. According to the arrest affidavit, filed Wednesday, Agrippine acknowledged being in a bathroom stall with the victim, a boy, caressing him from behind, and penetrating him with a finger.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Mascaro Ferri, 78, a former teacher of public school and church classes, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure in the health-care facility of the Twining Village Retirement Community, Holland. Mrs. Ferri had been a substitute teacher for the Bensalem School District for seven years. She taught Bible studies for 10 years for the women's circle of Northampton Presbyterian Church in Holland, and before that taught at the Bristol Assembly of God, where she served as Sunday school superintendent.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Christopher B. Daly, Washington Post Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A man who burned himself to death on the Amherst town common in an apparent protest against the Persian Gulf war was identified yesterday as Gregory D. Levey, 30, a substitute teacher. Authorities said Levey acted alone when he doused himself with two gallons of paint thinner and set himself ablaze Monday afternoon in a protest that horrified onlookers in the center of Amherst, a university town of about 35,000 residents about 75 miles west of Boston. Levey was the son of Robert Levey, Boston Globe restaurant critic, and the stepson of Ellen Goodman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Globe.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia substitute teacher Mohammed Abdo said two girls retaliated against his scoldings by making up claims that he kissed and fondled them. "I swear to Allah that I'm innocent," he said through a translator in court yesterday. "I would never have done such a thing. " Family Court Judge Tama Myers Clark found him guilty anyway. Abdo, 53, was convicted of two counts each of corrupting the morals of a minor, indecent assault and simple assault. He faces a maximum prison term ranging from one to five years when he is sentenced July 31. The mother of Heather Ackurman, the 10-year-old girl who accused Abdo of hugging her and rubbing her genitals, said she was relieved by the verdict.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | By Dianne Herrin, Special to The Inquirer
Armed only with her experience and wit, substitute teacher Jane Varnes must encounter unknown challenges each day at Octorara Intermediate School. "My friend John tried to sit with me today, and Mrs. Varnes wouldn't let him," said 12-year-old Bobby Hilton, one of the seventh graders she taught for a day on Sept. 25. "He tried to make up an excuse that he forgot his glasses, and he said he had to (sit there so he could) see the blackboard. " It didn't work. "She's strict," said Bobby's classmate Mike Byczkowski, 12. On every schoolday, substitute teachers are working in Chester County public schools, usually earning $50 to $60 per day. Daily substitutes working in the Octorara and Unionville-Chadds Ford school districts have the opportunity to earn more because those districts offer a graduated pay scale.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A PHILADELPHIA substitute teacher was awarded back pay and interest after filing a complaint that he was discriminated against because he is from Kenya, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission said yesterday. The commission ordered K-12 Staffing of Philadelphia to pay Paul Musumba $1,573. Musumba alleged that the company failed to pay him for 17 of the 27 days he worked as a substitute teacher for the vendor in September and October 2011, the commission said in a news release.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge has acquitted a Philadelphia substitute teacher on drug charges in a case authorities said marked the first appearance of "brown heroin" in the city in years. After hearing the prosecution's evidence, Judge James T. Giles on Wednesday acquitted Patrick Nweze, preventing the case from going to the jury. However, the jury did continue hearing evidence on Nweze's nephew, Sunday Obialo, and yesterday convicted him of conspiracy to distribute heroin. Sentencing for Obialo, of Griscom Street near Orthodox in Frankford, was set for June 16. Nweze was arrested in a raid on his house on Hawthorne Street near Wakeling in Frankford Aug. 5. Police said that in Nweze's basement, they found brown heroin, worth more than $500,000, in the covers of four textbooks.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Morton Botel, 90, of Philadelphia, an educator in the field of literacy who profoundly changed how reading and writing are taught to children in America, died Monday, July 6, of pneumonia and other causes at St. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. At the time of his death, he was visiting relatives in Ireland, a country he had grown to love, according to a death notice in the Irish Times. Dr. Botel was affiliated for many years with the University of Pennsylvania, first as an undergraduate student in 1942, then as a master's and doctoral student, and later as professor and professor emeritus of education at Penn's Graduate School of Education.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inez Sullivan Jackson, 82, a longtime Philadelphia schoolteacher and advocate for children, died at her North Philadelphia home Friday, June 19, of natural causes. Ms. Jackson was highly regarded by students she taught during her decades-long career in the Philadelphia School District. Some of her former students spoke at her funeral, Najah Jackson said, calling her grandmother an example "of what a teacher should be. " After working as a substitute teacher, she received her master of education degree from Temple University in 1977.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
RETIRED TEACHER Linda MacNeal is no longer a member of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, but yesterday she found herself back in the union's office to vent. The school district's new system of placing substitute teachers had been introduced at a morning informational session, prompting frustration and anger among some teachers over a cut in compensation. The new per-diem rates teachers would earn under Source4Teachers is "just insulting to me. And it says that [the company]
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission voted Thursday night to outsource more than 1,000 substitute-teaching jobs, awarding a $34 million contract to a Cherry Hill firm to recruit, hire, and manage the workers for two years. The unanimous vote came over the protests of the teachers' union, which currently represents subs. Jerry Jordan, president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, vowed legal action, including a possible claim of unfair labor practices, and said the move was part of a plan to "privatize public education one position at a time.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
WHILE STUDENTS headed home for the summer yesterday, the School Reform Commission approved the first of two staff outsourcing plans with the intent to cut costs and staff empty classrooms. The SRC voted unanimously to give Source4Teachers, based in Cherry Hill, N.J., a $34 million contract to manage substitute staffing services for two years. Chairwoman Marjorie Neff and Commissioner Sylvia Simms missed the meeting but cast their votes in a conference call. "The vendor was able to commit to us to provide high quality substitutes at a 90 percent fill rate by January of next year," said Naomi Wyatt, the district's head of human resources.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
CITY COUNCIL this week advanced a package of bills that raises taxes to provide an additional $70 million in aid to the School District of Philadelphia. Only it doesn't. A provision nestled in one of the bills would divert $25 million of the $70 million to Council's own budget to be held hostage, as it were, until the district satisfies Council that it is doing the right thing when it comes to unspecified items. Neither Council President Darrell Clarke nor other members have said publicly what they want.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
SAYING IT is having a hard time staffing classrooms when teachers are absent, the school district yesterday called on private companies to apply to handle a substitute teaching corps of about 1,000 teachers. "We don't have a deep enough substitute teachers' pool to fill the absences," when teachers call out sick or sometime take longtime leaves, said Naomi Wyatt, the district's chief talent officer. In a school system with between 8,000 to 9,000 teachers, Wyatt said that on any given day, the district may need to fill 500 absences.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A LOT OF urban kids resist getting into environmental studies because creeks and woods and the creepy crawly creatures that live in them are alien to them. "They don't want to sit in the dirt; they don't want to sit in the grass; they don't want to hold an earthworm," a teacher once said. But Phyllis Green's students at the Turner Middle School got acclimated fast as they squished in the mud on the banks of Cobbs Creek. In fact, Phyllis's students focused on restoring the creek, a body of sluggish water that has known the ravages of urban civilization, pollution and other disruptions through the years and sorely needed tender loving care.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
IT'S A NEW YEAR, but the fireworks at Bartram High School continue. A substitute teacher suffered a concussion Thursday after being thrown to the floor by a student. It was the third assault on a teacher at the Southwest Philadelphia school in the past month, district officials said yesterday. The teacher, whose name was not released, hit his head on the hallway floor following the assault but remained conscious, district spokesman Fernando Gallard said. The teacher was told to stay on the floor until medical help arrived and was taken to a nearby hospital and treated for a concussion.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A teacher at Bartram High School was attacked by a student and suffered a concussion this week after being thrown to the ground in an incident that was captured on video and widely shared on social media. It was the third such assault in a month at the violence-prone school, which in recent months had made some strides in safety that teachers say seem to be eroding. This week's incident happened Thursday afternoon, when a student attacked a substitute teacher who had asked him to leave a classroom earlier in the day, Philadelphia School District officials confirmed.
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