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Sudden Cardiac Arrest

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NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many children drop dead every year of sudden cardiac arrest? One thousand? Three thousand?   "We don't know," said Victoria Vetter, a pediatric cardiologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "The problem is we don't have a registry in the U.S. " The federal government last week said it will help develop a pediatric registry for sudden deaths. To better determine who is at risk of dying, from which cardiac disorder, a local group is also planning a database with results of electrocardiograms (EKGs)
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
All day Sunday, the cafeteria at Upper Dublin High School was filled with student athletes of every stripe. Soccer or football, gymnastics or field hockey - it didn't matter the sport. All were drawn for the same reason: to make sure their hearts were strong enough for athletics. The free public screening was sponsored by Simon's Fund, a local nonprofit that raises awareness of sudden cardiac arrest. Exercise can reveal underlying heart defects in teens and younger children that can lead to symptoms such as dizziness, fainting, chest pain, heart palpitations, and death.
NEWS
October 30, 2013
A story Sunday incorrectly gave the age at death of Simon Sudman, whose death from sudden cardiac arrest in 2005 led to the creation of Simon's Fund. He was 14 weeks old.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | By Charles Dennis
Important legislation that was approved Monday by the Assembly and Senate and that would require the placement of defibrillators in state buildings could save an untold number of lives from sudden cardiac arrest. The American Heart Association has called sudden cardiac arrest a "major unresolved public health issue. " At least 220,000 Americans die from sudden cardiac arrest annually. We refer to sudden cardiac arrest as a "major unresolved public health issue" because the survival rate is barely 5 percent.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
By Darren and Phyllis Sudman 'It's a rare occurrence. " That's a comforting notion until it happens to your child. Our child, Simon, was 3 months old and taking a nap when he died suddenly. The Lees' son, Jeffrey, was a University of Pennsylvania senior running the Philadelphia Marathon last weekend. Despite these differences, we now share a stark reality: We'll always wonder what our boys would have been when they grew up. Every year, thousands of children and young adults drop dead from sudden cardiac arrest.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Darren and Phyllis Sudman
February is American Heart Month, so naturally, on Feb. 1, the Philadelphia 76ers hosted their annual "Go Red Night. " As we walked into the venue, we were given a "Go Red for Women" sticker and a postcard to record the name of a loved one who has heart problems. Throughout the game, the crowd was educated about the stark reality that sudden cardiac arrest is the No. 1 cause of death in this country. We learned what symptoms women should look for and how they should modify their lifestyles for better heart health.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Darren and Phyllis Sudman channeled love and grief for the son they lost into a children's health crusade, but when they reflect on how quickly they raised $1 million and passed the nation's first law to protect youth athletes' hearts, the Plymouth Meeting couple credit business know-how honed during years at corporations like AOL . After the couple's 12-week-old, Simon, died in his sleep in 2005, the Sudmans discovered that both mother and...
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania House of Representatives has passed a bill designed to protect student athletes with undetected heart ailments from sudden death while playing sports. House Bill 1610 passed unanimously on Monday. Known as the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Prevention Act, it was sponsored by Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery). "I anticipate its moving through the Senate in October, and I'd love to have it to the governor by the end of November," Vereb said by phone from Harrisburg. The bill requires a coach, game official, or school-certified athletic trainer or doctor to be vigilant for signs of sudden cardiac arrest among student athletes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 30, 2013
A story Sunday incorrectly gave the age at death of Simon Sudman, whose death from sudden cardiac arrest in 2005 led to the creation of Simon's Fund. He was 14 weeks old.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many children drop dead every year of sudden cardiac arrest? One thousand? Three thousand?   "We don't know," said Victoria Vetter, a pediatric cardiologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "The problem is we don't have a registry in the U.S. " The federal government last week said it will help develop a pediatric registry for sudden deaths. To better determine who is at risk of dying, from which cardiac disorder, a local group is also planning a database with results of electrocardiograms (EKGs)
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Darren and Phyllis Sudman
February is American Heart Month, so naturally, on Feb. 1, the Philadelphia 76ers hosted their annual "Go Red Night. " As we walked into the venue, we were given a "Go Red for Women" sticker and a postcard to record the name of a loved one who has heart problems. Throughout the game, the crowd was educated about the stark reality that sudden cardiac arrest is the No. 1 cause of death in this country. We learned what symptoms women should look for and how they should modify their lifestyles for better heart health.
NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For competitors in endurance events, the most exhilarating place to be is near the finish line. It is also the riskiest. Last year, a 40-year-old runner in superb condition collapsed and died about a quarter-mile before the end of the Philadelphia Marathon. A 21-year-old student died shortly after completing that year's half-marathon. The pattern plays out across the country, with deaths in long-distance races concentrated in the last few miles or just afterward. "We don't really know what kicks the heart off," said William O. Roberts, a professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School and a founder of the American Road Race Medical Society.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
All day Sunday, the cafeteria at Upper Dublin High School was filled with student athletes of every stripe. Soccer or football, gymnastics or field hockey - it didn't matter the sport. All were drawn for the same reason: to make sure their hearts were strong enough for athletics. The free public screening was sponsored by Simon's Fund, a local nonprofit that raises awareness of sudden cardiac arrest. Exercise can reveal underlying heart defects in teens and younger children that can lead to symptoms such as dizziness, fainting, chest pain, heart palpitations, and death.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
Corbett's concern for students While I certainly see the merits of a bill that allows for a means to prevent sudden cardiac arrest among students, I wonder if I am the only one to see the irony in Gov. Corbett's being positioned as the champion of student safety at a time when the Philadelphia School District is in the process of eliminating school police and medical personnel due to its severe budget situation — caused, at least in part, by...
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Darren and Phyllis Sudman channeled love and grief for the son they lost into a children's health crusade, but when they reflect on how quickly they raised $1 million and passed the nation's first law to protect youth athletes' hearts, the Plymouth Meeting couple credit business know-how honed during years at corporations like AOL . After the couple's 12-week-old, Simon, died in his sleep in 2005, the Sudmans discovered that both mother and...
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Had he lived, Simon Sudman would have been a first grader this year. But his death at 3 months from an undetected heart defect in 2005 spurred his parents, Darren and Phyllis, to press for state laws that would help prevent sadness like theirs from darkening the lives of other families. On Wednesday, the Plymouth Meeting couple's efforts bore fruit: Gov. Corbett signed into law House Bill 1610, making Pennsylvania the first state to set standards for preventing sudden cardiac arrest and death in student athletes and children.
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