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NEWS
July 27, 2000 | By Jonathan Gelb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Betty Dudas is 81 years old, and she's covered in powdered sugar. She scratches at her skin, because the sugary coat makes her itch. As she wipes her hands on her blue apron, she leaves a trail of white. She looks down and flicks away the sticky stuff under her fingernails. It's hard to tell where her gray hair ends and the sugar begins. That's what happens when you powder more than 70,000 doughnuts in six days for the Kimberton Community Fair, where the Firemen's Auxiliary is churning out doughnuts as if they were dollar bills.
NEWS
July 29, 2004
Announcements of new medical findings or miracle drugs often leave us fighting bouts of skepticism. Seems something deemed healthy for us one day becomes the bane of our existence the next. Which brings us to caffeine and diabetes. Researchers at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center this week said having caffeine with meals has a negative effect on the blood sugar and insulin levels of Type 2 diabetics. In a country with an estimated 17 million Type 2 diabetics you might think this is big news.
LIVING
February 15, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Call it the disorder of the decade. You've certainly read about it. You've probably discussed it with friends. And chances are, amid the hoopla, you have wondered if you, too, have hypoglycemia. Why the hype about hypoglycemia? Because it has become a catch-all diagnosis for myriad problems related to low blood sugar. For the last decade, the public has been deluged with reports listing the symptoms associated with the condition. Before you could say, "Get me to a doctor, quick," plenty of people who occasionally felt even the slightest sign of dizziness, nausea or fatigue were convinced that they were victims of hypoglycemia.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Come the holidays, Walter Deuschle would carve an ice sculpture or make a gingerbread house. For special occasions, he might create an elaborate centerpiece or table decoration. But for most of his career as a chef, food-service supervisor, and later general manager at such local country clubs as Ashbourne, Whitemarsh, and Huntingdon Valley, Mr. D, as he was known, let his creative and artistic abilities lie fallow, devoting himself instead to pleasing the palates of diners and serving the needs of club members.
FOOD
February 18, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Sweet-and-sour sauces are popular in many cuisines. Unfortunately for waistline-watchers, the "sweet" part of the sauce usually derives from empty-caloried sugar or syrups. Health-food aficionados who substitute honey or molasses for the sugar aren't really saving any calories; these sweets are simply other kinds of refined carbohydrate. A better idea is to use fruit as part of the sweet-and-sour sauce - no sugar needed. Not only do you get natural sweetness, fruit comes "packaged" by Mother Nature with natural fiber - appetite-satisfying bulk - that can help thicken the sauce without adding refined flour or cornstarch.
FOOD
December 13, 2000 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
What: Splenda No Calorie Sweetener Maker: McNeil Specialty Products Co. Where: Supermarkets nationwide and at www.splenda.com Size: 1.9 ounces (55 grams), equivalent to 1 pound of sugar Price: $2.59-$2.99 Splenda is branded sucralose, a modified form of sucrose or table sugar. In use in Europe and Canada since 1991, it received FDA approval as a food ingredient here in 1998. The molecular structure is changed to keep the body from absorbing it as a carbohydrate, creating a product that can be labeled no-calorie and no-carbohydrate.
FOOD
May 8, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Please let me know what the ingredient is that's added to sugar to make powdered sugar? - Alice You can easily make your own powdered sugar at home by whirling regular white sugar in a blender or food processor (the food processor works best) until it is fine and powdery. It becomes even more like the commercial powdered sugar when you add 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch to each cup of granulated sugar before processing it. Store the homemade powdered sugar in an airtight covered container.
FOOD
December 17, 2009 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
There's no more apt ingredient for December than confectioners' sugar, the sweetener that, like snow, transforms whatever it touches - be that lightly or in heaps. Its wintry aesthetics and seemingly magical properties make it symbolic of the small joys of Christmas and all manner of year-end celebrations. It is impossibly white, more so than freshly fallen snow or an angel's wing. It is so silky and light that if a baker isn't careful shoveling it into a mixing bowl, tiny blizzards cloud the kitchen.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
What's a mother (or father) to do? A report published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine - the people who brought us the ThighMaster scare - concluded that sugar doesn't make kids bounce off the walls. Many kids, we're told, are just naturally bouncy. Sugar may even have a slightly calming effect on some. So what now? Are we supposed to run out now and stock up on Snickers? Has Halloween come early for millions of children? Don't count on it. Whether you're a wheat-germ-and-brown-rice fanatic or you believe a Twinkie a day keeps the blues away, one study isn't likely to change your mind about sugar.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2004 | By Craig Laban INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
They perfected the art of making cake without the "c. " But can the pastry wizards at Tasty Baking Co. preserve the love in their confections with fewer carbs and no sugar? After a sneak preview tasting of the new line of Sensables treats, I'd say that depends on how desperately you need that Tastykake fix. There is no way a devotee of the company's standard iced fudge bar will consider the Sensables chocolate-chip cookie bar an equal substitute. The rich shmear of icing on the original is replaced by a brittle snap of tiny sugar-free chocolate pebbles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Simpatico Theatre Project presents Obie Award-winning Milk Like Sugar by Kirsten Greenidge, an engrossing drama that is both a cautionary tale and a societal indictment, with a superb cast. Greenidge can write what sounded to me to be pitch-perfect dialogue, and Alan Radway directs the ensemble with respect and a clever use of the Adrienne Theatre's Skybox space. Three teenage African American girls, living in a ghettoized community in any American city, are sworn friends: Annie (Nastassja Baset)
NEWS
December 19, 2014
EGGNOG fan Donal McCoy of Sassafras in Old City (48 S. 2nd St.) will be serving this version of the classic holiday drink through Jan. 6, the Feast of the Epiphany. It's $8 a glass. EGGNOG 16 eggs, yolks and whites separated 1 1/3 cups sugar, plus an additional 1/8 cup 1/2 gallon milk 1 quart heavy cream Cinnamon and nutmeg, for seasoning Using a stand mixer, whip egg yolks (keep whites in separate container) on high until color lightens, about 3 minutes. Once yolks change color, slowly incorporate the 1 1/3 cups sugar.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE UNDERAGE GIRLS who attended booze-and-drug-fueled parties at Tawfik Nakishbendi's Manayunk home called him "Doc" and "Sugar Daddy," but the state has determined that "sexually violent predator" is a better moniker. Nakishbendi, 65, a small, balding man, pleaded guilty in two sexual-assault cases in Common Pleas Court yesterday and was sentenced to five to 12 years in state prison and 10 years' probation. He was determined to be a sexually violent predator and will be required to register as such for the rest of his life, under Megan's Law. Nakishbendi tried to give reason to his creepy actions by telling Judge Gwendolyn Bright that he was distraught after his wife's suicide in 2006 and sought "refuge in anything.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In rejecting SugarHouse Casino's "impassioned argument" that the Philadelphia area cannot bear another casino, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board relied partially on SugarHouse's own performance. The Gaming Board cited data showing that each of SugarHouse's 1,600 slot machines raked in an average of $299 per day in the year ended Sept. 30, or 25 percent more than the statewide average. Furthermore, in a 174-page document explaining its reasons for awarding Philadelphia's second casino license to Live!
NEWS
October 10, 2014
SPICED CANDIED PECANS 4 cups sugar, divided 3 cups water 1 pound raw pecan halves 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger 1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg 3/4 teaspoon ground allspice Heat the oven to 275 degrees. In a large saucepan, combine 3 cups sugar, water and pecans. Bring to a simmer over high heat, then reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook pecans until softened, about 10 minutes. While the pecans are simmering, combine spices in a small bowl, along with the remaining 1 cup sugar.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia has gone to court in a bid to recoup more than $520,000 from 63 gamblers who have failed to repay markers - casino loans - issued in the last four years. The action offers a peek into the opaque world of casino credit, an unusual form of commerce in that the money that is lent usually goes right back to the lender in the form of gambling losses. That makes it a transaction fundamentally different than a retailer selling a sofa on credit. "There's an incentive for liberal lending because the odds are that the money is not leaving the building," said Paul Boni, a lawyer in Philadelphia and a board member of Stop Predatory Gambling, a national advocacy group.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MAYBE IT was just an innocent mistake in the food-testing lab. Or maybe it's a big, fat Greek yogurt conspiracy designed to give the health-conscious grocer Whole Foods the edge in an ultracompetitive market. Don't worry, though. This is nothing that a couple of class-action lawsuits can't fix. Yesterday, the lawyers who made headlines for suing Subway over the length of its so-called footlong sandwiches filed a lawsuit in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court claiming that Whole Foods is selling Greek yogurt with nearly six times the sugar listed on the label.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
SHOVELS ARE finally in the ground for the long-planned expansion of SugarHouse Casino. SugarHouse officials, politicians and other big shots were on hand yesterday morning for a groundbreaking ceremony as Philadelphia's first legal casino launched a $164 million construction project. When completed next year, the Fishtown waterfront complex will boast a multiuse event space with river views, new restaurants, a seven-story, 1,500-space parking garage and a poker room with 30 tables.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
SugarHouse Casino executives and owners, along with several politicians, officially broke ground Tuesday on a long-planned $164 million expansion of the Fishtown property. When SugarHouse opened in September 2010 - after delays caused by community opposition and financing struggles rooted in the 2007-08 economic collapse - it was considered an interim facility. The anticipated expansion was then delayed by a lawsuit to block the expansion by partners with a minority share of ownership, and by the slow process of obtaining permits from the Army Corps of Engineers and others.
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