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NEWS
July 27, 2000 | By Jonathan Gelb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Betty Dudas is 81 years old, and she's covered in powdered sugar. She scratches at her skin, because the sugary coat makes her itch. As she wipes her hands on her blue apron, she leaves a trail of white. She looks down and flicks away the sticky stuff under her fingernails. It's hard to tell where her gray hair ends and the sugar begins. That's what happens when you powder more than 70,000 doughnuts in six days for the Kimberton Community Fair, where the Firemen's Auxiliary is churning out doughnuts as if they were dollar bills.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What they are: Doughnuts are a popular sweet treat. Who doesn't love a delicious lump of deep-fried dough, simply glazed with sugar or icing, or filled with sweet creme or fruit preserves? Entire franchises and chain restaurants have been built on the concept of selling pretty much nothing but the doughnut – and perhaps a good cup of coffee to go with it. But at the Jersey Shore, beloved outlets for doughnuts are usually of the smaller, more homespun genre. Like on the Ocean City boardwalk, where, rain or shine, hundreds of people will line up every summer morning - between 7 and 11 a.m. the queue often has more than 100 people in it - for doughnuts at Browns Restaurant between St. Charles Place and First Street.
NEWS
July 29, 2004
Announcements of new medical findings or miracle drugs often leave us fighting bouts of skepticism. Seems something deemed healthy for us one day becomes the bane of our existence the next. Which brings us to caffeine and diabetes. Researchers at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center this week said having caffeine with meals has a negative effect on the blood sugar and insulin levels of Type 2 diabetics. In a country with an estimated 17 million Type 2 diabetics you might think this is big news.
LIVING
February 15, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Call it the disorder of the decade. You've certainly read about it. You've probably discussed it with friends. And chances are, amid the hoopla, you have wondered if you, too, have hypoglycemia. Why the hype about hypoglycemia? Because it has become a catch-all diagnosis for myriad problems related to low blood sugar. For the last decade, the public has been deluged with reports listing the symptoms associated with the condition. Before you could say, "Get me to a doctor, quick," plenty of people who occasionally felt even the slightest sign of dizziness, nausea or fatigue were convinced that they were victims of hypoglycemia.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Come the holidays, Walter Deuschle would carve an ice sculpture or make a gingerbread house. For special occasions, he might create an elaborate centerpiece or table decoration. But for most of his career as a chef, food-service supervisor, and later general manager at such local country clubs as Ashbourne, Whitemarsh, and Huntingdon Valley, Mr. D, as he was known, let his creative and artistic abilities lie fallow, devoting himself instead to pleasing the palates of diners and serving the needs of club members.
FOOD
February 18, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Sweet-and-sour sauces are popular in many cuisines. Unfortunately for waistline-watchers, the "sweet" part of the sauce usually derives from empty-caloried sugar or syrups. Health-food aficionados who substitute honey or molasses for the sugar aren't really saving any calories; these sweets are simply other kinds of refined carbohydrate. A better idea is to use fruit as part of the sweet-and-sour sauce - no sugar needed. Not only do you get natural sweetness, fruit comes "packaged" by Mother Nature with natural fiber - appetite-satisfying bulk - that can help thicken the sauce without adding refined flour or cornstarch.
FOOD
December 13, 2000 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
What: Splenda No Calorie Sweetener Maker: McNeil Specialty Products Co. Where: Supermarkets nationwide and at www.splenda.com Size: 1.9 ounces (55 grams), equivalent to 1 pound of sugar Price: $2.59-$2.99 Splenda is branded sucralose, a modified form of sucrose or table sugar. In use in Europe and Canada since 1991, it received FDA approval as a food ingredient here in 1998. The molecular structure is changed to keep the body from absorbing it as a carbohydrate, creating a product that can be labeled no-calorie and no-carbohydrate.
FOOD
May 8, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Please let me know what the ingredient is that's added to sugar to make powdered sugar? - Alice You can easily make your own powdered sugar at home by whirling regular white sugar in a blender or food processor (the food processor works best) until it is fine and powdery. It becomes even more like the commercial powdered sugar when you add 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch to each cup of granulated sugar before processing it. Store the homemade powdered sugar in an airtight covered container.
FOOD
December 17, 2009 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
There's no more apt ingredient for December than confectioners' sugar, the sweetener that, like snow, transforms whatever it touches - be that lightly or in heaps. Its wintry aesthetics and seemingly magical properties make it symbolic of the small joys of Christmas and all manner of year-end celebrations. It is impossibly white, more so than freshly fallen snow or an angel's wing. It is so silky and light that if a baker isn't careful shoveling it into a mixing bowl, tiny blizzards cloud the kitchen.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
What's a mother (or father) to do? A report published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine - the people who brought us the ThighMaster scare - concluded that sugar doesn't make kids bounce off the walls. Many kids, we're told, are just naturally bouncy. Sugar may even have a slightly calming effect on some. So what now? Are we supposed to run out now and stock up on Snickers? Has Halloween come early for millions of children? Don't count on it. Whether you're a wheat-germ-and-brown-rice fanatic or you believe a Twinkie a day keeps the blues away, one study isn't likely to change your mind about sugar.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 11, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 1 quart, or 8 servings 2 cups fresh or frozen/defrosted blackberries, coarsely chopped 11/2 cups water 11/4 cups pure bottled pomegranate-blueberry juice, plus more as needed 6 tablespoons sugar 1/2 cup clover honey, plus more as needed 1 tablespoon chopped fresh culinary lavender spikes (bloom heads) or 1 tablespoon dried culinary lavender buds (see recipe for Candied Lavender Pecans) 1/3 cup fresh lime juice 1. Thoroughly stir together the blackberries, water, pomegranate-blueberry juice, sugar, and honey in a medium nonreactive saucepan.
FOOD
August 11, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 8 servings For the lavender sugar: 1 to 2 tablespoons dried culinary lavender buds 2 cups granulated sugar For the candied pecans: 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more as needed 2 cups unsalted pecan halves 1. For the lavender sugar: Combine the lavender (to taste) and 1/2 cup of the sugar in a food processor. Process until the lavender is ground very fine, 4 to 5 minutes. (Alternatively, grind the lavender and sugar in a spice grinder for 1 minute.)
SPORTS
August 9, 2016
YOU COULD sense something wasn't right, well before we would realize it for sure, when Virginia Elena Carta first draped a golf towel over her head. That was on the fifth green Sunday afternoon at Springfield's Rolling Green Golf Club, during the second 18 holes in the championship match of the U.S. Women's Amateur. As signs go it probably wasn't a good one, even if few of those watching - either in person or on TV - probably thought too much of it at the time. But it would soon become a huge deal.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Vance Lehmkuhl, Staff Writer
Nationally, VegFests are on the rise, those one- or two-day get-togethers of meat-free eaters over meat-free food, often with speakers and entertainment. And one way Philly is proving its "Vegandelphia" cred is by upping our own vegan-events game. As August kicks off and our usual crop of late-summer convocations is readied for harvest (see below), one new plant-based event especially stands out: S.E.E.D: Sustainable Everyday Edibles and Drinkables will be held from 2 to 6 p.m. Aug. 14 at SugarHouse Casino.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia doctor was arraigned Wednesday in a Montgomery County Court on charges that he illegally provided drugs for more than a year to a woman he met on a "sugar daddy" website, prosecutors said. Sean Graham Fogler, 47, an anesthesiologist, met the woman on seekingarrangements.com in February 2014 and continued a relationship with her until June 2015, prosecutors said. During that time, he allegedly provided her and several of her friends heroin, fentanyl, cocaine, propofol, Xanax, Percocet, and MDMA, also know as ecstasy or Molly.
FOOD
July 21, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 2 servings 1 cucumber (about 11 ounces) 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 1/2 teaspoon sugar 2 teaspoons light soy sauce 2 teaspoons Chinkiang vinegar 2 tablespoons chili oil A pinch or two of ground roasted Sichuan pepper (optional) 1. Lay the cucumber on a chopping board and smack it hard a few times with the flat blade of a Chinese cleaver or with a rolling pin. Then cut it lengthwise into four pieces. Hold your knife at an angle to the chopping board and cut the cucumber on the diagonal into 1/2-inch slices.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
An avid scuba diver, Wendy Hamilton, 45, general manager at the newly expanded SugarHouse Casino, majored in marine biology. She imagined that one day she'd be teaching - in college, or somewhere like the all-girls' Catholic high school she attended in Bryn Mawr. So how did Hamilton end up running a major casino, one of the few women to hold that job in the nation? "My dad teases me and says it was all that exposure to Catholic bingo that put me into this," Hamilton said. Very funny.
FOOD
June 17, 2016
Makes 6 servings 21/4 pounds strawberries, hulled 1 cup granulated sugar 1 vanilla bean, split in half lengthwise 2 strips of lemon peel 11/2 cups heavy cream 1/2 cup whole milk 4 medium egg yolks Equipment: Fine-mesh nylon sieve Ice cream maker Plastic freezer-safe container 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Put the strawberries in an ovenproof ceramic dish or a baking pan lined with parchment paper. Toss with ¼ cup of the sugar and tuck one half of the vanilla bean and the lemon peels in with the berries.
FOOD
June 17, 2016
Makes 8 servings 1 tablespoon softened, unsalted butter 11/4 cups milk 6 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons kirsch 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 6 eggs Kosher salt 3/4 cup flour 3 cups unpitted or pitted sour cherries Confectioners' sugar, to dust   1. Heat oven to 425. Butter a 9-inch cast-iron skillet or baking dish, and set aside. Combine milk, sugar, kirsch, vanilla, eggs, and salt in a blender. Blend for a few seconds to mix ingredients, then add the flour, and blend until smooth, about one more minute.
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 8 servings 2 cups pastry flour 3 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons sugar 2 eggs, slightly beaten 1 cup milk 1/4 cup melted butter 1 pint pitted sour cherries 1. Sift flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Combine eggs, milk, and butter. Pour wet ingredients over dry, and mix until moistened. The batter will be lumpy. 2. Spoon batter into buttered muffin cups until about two-thirds full. Place 5-6 cherries on top of each muffin; bake at 400 for 12-13 minutes.
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