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Sugar Ray Leonard

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NEWS
February 2, 1991 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Trump stood on the steps of his hotel, the Plaza, yesterday afternoon. Fifth Avenue was in front of him, Central Park to his left, Bergdorf Goodman to his right. Behind him, assembled by his people, were a half-dozen New York Yankees, past and present, and Sugar Ray Leonard, the great welterweight. A woman wearing a fur coat asked a doorman what was going on. "A press conference," came the reply - to show support for the troops in the Persian Gulf. The marble pillars of the hotel were wrapped in sashes of blue and white and red, and the cold air was filled with taped parade music.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
Pennsylvania State University will hold a conference on child sexual abuse and trauma featuring appearances by former victims Sugar Ray Leonard and Elizabeth Smart. Leonard, the boxer, and Smart, whose kidnapping in Utah made headlines, will speak during the event at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel on Oct. 29 and 30. Experts on child sex abuse and trauma also will participate. Members of the public may register for the conference at http://protectchildren.psu.edu . The conference is part of the university's effort to address the issue in the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal.
NEWS
April 8, 1987
Boxing fans will be arguing for years to come whether Sugar Ray Leonard really defeated Marvelous Marvin Hagler Monday night in Las Vegas, but no one can dispute the greater truth that, whichever fighter held the narrow edge of victory, Mr. Leonard triumphed. The experts had all seen it before, the once-great champ who could not resist the temptation to climb back into the ring and show that the years of inactivity have done nothing to diminish his skills. Mr. Leonard, a wiser man than most, had quit in his prime, made one unimpressive comeback attempt and then gone back to enjoying his millions.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
In a town with more than its share of comedians, even the hint of a controversy almost instantly can be turned into a stand-up routine. Did you hear about Ben Johnson? He's moving to Las Vegas and taking up boxing. So it has come down to this. Monday night's scheduled 12-rounder between Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns, which is likely to become the highest- grossing prizefight of all time, is now a running gag about the possible use of anabolic steroids by Leonard. The only problem is that none of the principals, the accused and his accusers, finds the matter particularly amusing.
SPORTS
December 6, 1989 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Acri promotes boxers - which means he has a license to hype their fights and analyze their psyches. The latest fighters to come under his scrutiny are Roberto Duran and Sugar Ray Leonard, who will face each other tomorrow night at the Mirage. "Roberto Duran's motivation comes from here," Acri said, tapping his heart. Then he paused for effect. "Sugar Ray Leonard's motivation comes from here," he said, patting his wallet. So there you have it: Duran and Leonard project images that are as different as their fighting styles.
SPORTS
December 9, 1989 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Bo Derek was present yesterday morning when someone asked Sugar Ray Leonard to rate his current skill level on a 1-to-10 basis. "I give myself a 9 3/4," Leonard said, 12 hours after he retained his World Boxing Council super-middleweight championship with a nearly flawless performance against Roberto Duran. "I don't think I've slipped that much. The speed and the quickness are still there. " It has been a decade since Bo Derek starred in the movie "10," and as beautiful as she remains, after all that time she herself might be willing to deduct a quarter-point for wear and tear.
SPORTS
April 3, 1987 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Win or lose against Marvelous Marvin Hagler, Sugar Ray Leonard will fatten his pocketbook to the tune of $11 million. That is a lot of fat. It is hardly surprising, however, in light of the money-making machine that is Sugar Ray Leonard. The former welterweight and junior-middleweight champion has earned $46 million in his 34-bout career - more than $1 million per fight. And that is only the start of it. "Ray is worth much more now than he was when he retired three years ago," said his attorney, Mike Trainer.
SPORTS
March 2, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The question was: Would the legendary Sugar Ray Leonard, making a ring comeback after a six-year retirement, be the Sugar Ray of old, or would he be an old Sugar Ray? After three months of deliberation, the answer for the five-time champion was delivered early this morning at the Atlantic City Convention Hall. Leonard left the ring bruised, swollen and bleeding, an exhausted 40-year-old grandfather. Hector "Macho" Camacho, an impertinent Puerto Rican-born New Yorker six years younger, put Leonard down early in Round 5, battered him on the ropes, and landed 10 punches to the head for a technical knockout at 1 minute, 8 seconds.
SPORTS
June 7, 1989 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
If their sparring sessions are any indication, Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns are taking decidedly different paths in training in the days leading up to Monday night's showdown at Caesars Palace. Leonard worked three light and easy rounds yesterday against longtime spar mate Henry Bunch-Bay. That was in stark contrast to the four-round slugfest engaged in earlier by Hearns and one of his former opponents, James "The Heat" Kinchen. Leonard, for the most part, threw few punches, preferring to concentrate on his footwork.
SPORTS
April 6, 1987 | By STAN HOCHMAN, Daily News Sports Columnist
Question: Why is Sugar Ray Leonard's mind so clean? Answer: Because he changes it so often. Sugar Ray Leonard fondled his Olympic gold medal in 1976, said he would not turn pro because he was enrolling at the University of Maryland. He turned pro. Made Roberto Duran quit, turned Tommy Hearns's legs to tapioca, won two titles, made more money than the other four '76 gold medal winners combined. And in November 1982, in an arena he'd rented, wearing a tuxedo he owned, sporting a gloomy expression he borrowed, Leonard wistfully announced his retirement.
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NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
'I'm a man. I'm a champion. I didn't want to look weak. " Weak is not a word usually associated with five-time world boxing champion Sugar Ray Leonard. But as a survivor of child sexual abuse, a secret Leonard concealed for more than 40 years, he feared people might view him differently if he ever disclosed it. "I knew something was wrong," he says. "I drank to numb and cushion what I was hiding. When people see me, they see a champion who kicked [Roberto] Duran's butt, but the kid inside me was still living, and I didn't know how to find comfort.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Sugar Ray Leonard still hasn't told his parents or his 11-year-old son, and Monday was just the second time that he spoke publicly about being sexually abused as an adolescent. He had not written a speech, and he momentarily grasped for words. During a 30-minute talk before a room full of experts and advocates, however, the boxing legend moved quickly from uncertainty to clarity - "I am a survivor of childhood sexual abuse" - and then a declaration that surprised even organizers of the Pennsylvania State University conference.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
Pennsylvania State University will hold a conference on child sexual abuse and trauma featuring appearances by former victims Sugar Ray Leonard and Elizabeth Smart. Leonard, the boxer, and Smart, whose kidnapping in Utah made headlines, will speak during the event at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel on Oct. 29 and 30. Experts on child sex abuse and trauma also will participate. Members of the public may register for the conference at http://protectchildren.psu.edu . The conference is part of the university's effort to address the issue in the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal.
SPORTS
February 8, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - It wasn't just the words - "You're blowing it, son!" - that Sugar Ray Leonard heard as he peered into the wise, aged eyes of trainer Angelo Dundee more than 30 years ago. Leonard also caught the sincerity of the message, and with that the motivation necessary to score a remarkable 14th-round knockout of Thomas Hearns that enhanced his standing as an icon of boxing. Leonard is beginning work on a film version of his recent autobiography. Dundee, who died last Wednesday at 90, is best remembered for being the longtime trainer of Muhammad Ali and Leonard.
SPORTS
September 21, 2001 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sugar Ray Leonard has made another comeback. This time, however, the former five-time world champion is looking to make his mark outside the ring instead of between the ropes. Leonard, 45, has ventured into boxing promotion. He will bring a fight card to the First Union Center on Oct. 5 that features Philadelphia's Charles "The Hatchet" Brewer (36-8, 26 KOs) against Fernando Zuniga (21-4, 16 KOs) for the vacant NABF super middleweight title. The show, Leonard's third, will be televised by ESPN2 as part of its Friday Night Fights series.
SPORTS
April 8, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Rolly Schwartz, coach and manager of the 1976 U.S. Olympic boxing team who died yesterday, will be missed by the sport, Sugar Ray Leonard said. "When I think about Rolly Schwartz, I think of class," said Leonard, the retired world champion and one of five gold medalists on the team. "Rolly was class personified. Schwartz, 84, died in a hospice in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to Leonard, his gold medalists at Montreal were brothers Michael and Leon Spinks, Howard Davis and Leo Randolph.
SPORTS
March 3, 1997 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
There was no reason to be embarrassed, Sugar Ray Leonard said at his final postfight press conference, because he had given 100 percent of himself. Trouble is, Leonard was giving 100 percent of the perhaps 25 percent that remained of what once had been one of the greatest boxers of all time. And, against a focused and opportunistic Hector "Macho" Camacho, the fractions simply did not add up to a winning effort. That the 40-year-old Leonard lost is understandable, coming off six years of inactivity.
SPORTS
March 3, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, the great Sugar Ray Leonard went out stumbling, tripping, wobbling, bumbling, staggering, falling, lunging, floundering. But worse, he went out with a whimper and a whine. In the last fight of a mostly grand 40-bout career, the former five-time world champion joined a long list of ring greats who didn't know when to quit. But unlike Muhammad Ali, Joe Louis and Sugar Ray Robinson - champions who faced career-ending batterings head-on - Leonard chose to cling to one last thread of denial.
SPORTS
March 2, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The question was: Would the legendary Sugar Ray Leonard, making a ring comeback after a six-year retirement, be the Sugar Ray of old, or would he be an old Sugar Ray? After three months of deliberation, the answer for the five-time champion was delivered early this morning at the Atlantic City Convention Hall. Leonard left the ring bruised, swollen and bleeding, an exhausted 40-year-old grandfather. Hector "Macho" Camacho, an impertinent Puerto Rican-born New Yorker six years younger, put Leonard down early in Round 5, battered him on the ropes, and landed 10 punches to the head for a technical knockout at 1 minute, 8 seconds.
SPORTS
March 1, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Someone asked Sugar Ray Leonard, a grandfather and six years removed from his most recent fight, which resulted in a terrible beating, if he considered himself one of top 10 middleweights in the world today. "Hell, yes," Leonard, 40, replied. Well, how about the top five? "Yeah," he answered. Top two, then? Top one? Leonard smiled, like the cat that ate the canary. He is not as young as he used to be, and probably not as quick, but that enormous ego has not been damaged one iota by the passage of time.
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