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Sugar

NEWS
March 30, 1991 | By JACK GARVEY
Once I thought that addiction to television was doing more to destroy America than drugs and alcohol combined. Lately, however, I'm convinced that a less conspicuous addiction leads our youth into habits of cigarettes, drugs, drink, brain-damage music and brain- dead television as surely as tugboats take tankers into open seas. I am talking about the addiction to sugar. A few years ago, my daughter Rachel's mother, who has always worked with young children, became convinced that sugar made the difference between a well-adjusted child and a problem child - between a child willing and wanting to learn and a child with no attention span.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | By Eils Lotozo, Special to The Inquirer
The world over, sweet things mark the stages and seasons of life. In America, it's candy for Halloween, chocolate eggs for Easter, cookies for Christmas, and cake for weddings, birthdays and anniversaries. In Mexico, brightly decorated sugar skulls are central to Day of the Dead festivities. In Eastern Europe, the exchange of decorated honey cakes is a courtship ritual, while in Japan, tiny candies shaped like flowers, leaves and insects are given to celebrate the changing seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2008
Q: I read your column about sweet potatoes and yams. My question: Can sweet potatoes and regular potatoes can be used interchangeably? - Speedy A: Calm down, Speedy - potatoes do take a while to cook, and you don't want to rush the enjoyment of eating them. Unless of course, there is a ball game on and you want to get back to the television. In fact, my favorite team is about to play, so I am going to give you a "speedy" answer. Basically, you can substitute sweet potatoes in any recipe that calls for russet potatoes.
FOOD
December 18, 1991 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to the Inquirer
All living things must eat, and without the ability to distinguish what is good to eat from what is not, none of us would live very long. Through trial and error, we eventually collect foods that reflect not just our own taste, but the tastes of our culture. Sometimes it requires resolving apparent contradictions. Something, for example, has to tell us that smelly fish will make us sick but that smelly cheese will not. That's where the tongue, the nose and the brain work together, helping us decide that peanut butter really does go with chocolate, or that we should risk breaking family traditions with a carrot in the cacciatore or coriander on the holiday turkey.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Joyce Gemperlein
¼ cup tomato paste ¼ cup sorghum molasses, unsulfured molasses, or maple syrup (see note) 3 tablespoons dry mustard 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar Kosher salt 1 cup dark beer 2 quarts cooked white beans, drained, cooking liquid reserved 6 thick slices smoked bacon   1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine the tomato paste, sorghum, dry mustard, vinegar, brown sugar, and 1 teaspoon salt.
NEWS
September 28, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by William F. Steinmetz
More than 100 pastry chefs gathered to celebrate St. Michel Day, a French holiday that honors their patron saint. The event was held at Opus 251 at the Philadelphia Art Alliance. The chefs demonstrated "sugar pulling," turning sugar into decorative objects.
NEWS
April 1, 2010
IT WAS Sunday night, and, instead of being home with my family, I was in my office contemplating the soda tax. (Yes, my life is unimaginably exciting.) I was looking at a bottle of soda and decided to do an experiment. The above photo is the result. One 20-ounce bottle of Mountain Dew has 73 grams of sugar, which translates to 2.57 ounces of pure sugar (that's 2.57 ounces of sugar in the container next to the soda), which translates into 24 packets of sugar (those packets in front of the soda bottle, like the ones on a table in a restaurant)
FOOD
November 20, 1996 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Creme brulee, a creamy and rich baked custard with a caramelized top makes a handsome and delicious Thanksgiving Day dessert - albeit high in calories and cholesterol. But as a special holiday treat - you don't have to eat the entire ramekin at a single sitting - it works well. In some circles, this dish is often referred to as a Cambridge cream, because its roots are traced to Trinity College in Cambridge, England. It is basically egg yolks mixed with sugar and cream that is scalded, not boiled.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1½ tablespoons peeled and grated fresh ginger 1½ tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon brown sugar ½ cup pure olive oil   1. Whisk together all ingredients in small bowl or put ingredients in a covered jar and shake until the sugar dissolves.   From Solo Suppers by Joyce Goldstein (2003)   Note: Trader Joe's Sesame Soy Ginger Vinaigrette may be used as a substitute. Per three-tablespoon serving:   247 calories, trace protein, 1 gram carbohydrates, 1 gram sugar, 27 grams fat, no cholesterol, 46 milligrams sodium, no dietary fiber.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2010
Editor's note: Here are two recipe excerpts from The Essential New York Times Cookbook , including the lively commentary and recipe history from author Amanda Hesser that make this book both a joy and an education to read. Purple Plum Torte is both the most often published and the most requested recipe in the Times archives. By my count, Marian Burros (who was given the recipe by Lois Levine, with whom Burros wrote Elegant but Easy ) ran the recipe in the paper twelve times.
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