CollectionsSugar
IN THE NEWS

Sugar

ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1988 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Thirteen dollars and ninety-five cents for a quart of maple syrup? Are you sure this price is marked correctly?" "Ayuh. " "But how can anybody charge that much? That's more than a quart of vodka costs, more than 50 quarts of gasoline. Are you sure that's right?" "Yup. " "I know. I'll bet you have this high price marked, but you're willing to bargain, right? Would you take $5 for this quart of syrup?" "Nope. " "But this must be a special outrageous price for the tourists from Philadelphia, right?
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | By JACK GARVEY
Once I thought that addiction to television was doing more to destroy America than drugs and alcohol combined. Lately, however, I'm convinced that a less conspicuous addiction leads our youth into habits of cigarettes, drugs, drink, brain-damage music and brain- dead television as surely as tugboats take tankers into open seas. I am talking about the addiction to sugar. A few years ago, my daughter Rachel's mother, who has always worked with young children, became convinced that sugar made the difference between a well-adjusted child and a problem child - between a child willing and wanting to learn and a child with no attention span.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | By Eils Lotozo, Special to The Inquirer
The world over, sweet things mark the stages and seasons of life. In America, it's candy for Halloween, chocolate eggs for Easter, cookies for Christmas, and cake for weddings, birthdays and anniversaries. In Mexico, brightly decorated sugar skulls are central to Day of the Dead festivities. In Eastern Europe, the exchange of decorated honey cakes is a courtship ritual, while in Japan, tiny candies shaped like flowers, leaves and insects are given to celebrate the changing seasons.
FOOD
December 18, 1991 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to the Inquirer
All living things must eat, and without the ability to distinguish what is good to eat from what is not, none of us would live very long. Through trial and error, we eventually collect foods that reflect not just our own taste, but the tastes of our culture. Sometimes it requires resolving apparent contradictions. Something, for example, has to tell us that smelly fish will make us sick but that smelly cheese will not. That's where the tongue, the nose and the brain work together, helping us decide that peanut butter really does go with chocolate, or that we should risk breaking family traditions with a carrot in the cacciatore or coriander on the holiday turkey.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
With tomato season nearly upon us, many a consumer soon will be scanning the shelves for specimens with that uniform hue of eye-catching red - a characteristic that shoppers have come to expect from modern agriculture. But in the quest for good looks, they likely are giving up something in the taste and nutrition department, according to new research published Friday in the journal Science. Tomatoes that have been bred to ripen with a uniform color contain up to 20 percent less sugar than their counterparts with green or yellow patches on the "shoulder" of the fruit, the researchers found after a genetic analysis.
NEWS
May 17, 2012
2 tablespoons brown sugar (and a few more pinches for step 2) 2 tablespoons butter, softened 1 egg, well-beaten 1/2 cup flour, sifted 1 pinch salt 1 pinch cinnamon 2 pinches nutmeg 1 teaspoon caraway seeds (optional)   1. Cream the brown sugar and butter. Add the egg, sifted flour, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg; beat well. If you like old-fashioned flavor, add 1 teaspoon of caraway seeds to the batter at this point. 2. Drop by small flattened spoonfuls, well apart, on a greased cookie sheet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Jason Wilson
Here are two cool and delicious popsicle recipes you can try at home from Jeanne Chang at Lil Pop Shop in West Philly. For both recipes, if using pop molds with lids that include sticks or will hold sticks, divide the mixture among the molds.  Freeze until solid, about 5 hours.  If using unconventional molds, divide mixture among the molds and freeze for about 90 minutes to 2 hours until pops begin to set, then insert sticks and freeze until solid, about 3 1/2 to 4 hours. If using instant ice pop maker, such as Zoku, follow manufacturer instructions.
NEWS
September 28, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by William F. Steinmetz
More than 100 pastry chefs gathered to celebrate St. Michel Day, a French holiday that honors their patron saint. The event was held at Opus 251 at the Philadelphia Art Alliance. The chefs demonstrated "sugar pulling," turning sugar into decorative objects.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MAYBE IT was just an innocent mistake in the food-testing lab. Or maybe it's a big, fat Greek yogurt conspiracy designed to give the health-conscious grocer Whole Foods the edge in an ultracompetitive market. Don't worry, though. This is nothing that a couple of class-action lawsuits can't fix. Yesterday, the lawyers who made headlines for suing Subway over the length of its so-called footlong sandwiches filed a lawsuit in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court claiming that Whole Foods is selling Greek yogurt with nearly six times the sugar listed on the label.
NEWS
April 1, 2010
IT WAS Sunday night, and, instead of being home with my family, I was in my office contemplating the soda tax. (Yes, my life is unimaginably exciting.) I was looking at a bottle of soda and decided to do an experiment. The above photo is the result. One 20-ounce bottle of Mountain Dew has 73 grams of sugar, which translates to 2.57 ounces of pure sugar (that's 2.57 ounces of sugar in the container next to the soda), which translates into 24 packets of sugar (those packets in front of the soda bottle, like the ones on a table in a restaurant)
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|