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Sugar

NEWS
March 30, 1991 | By JACK GARVEY
Once I thought that addiction to television was doing more to destroy America than drugs and alcohol combined. Lately, however, I'm convinced that a less conspicuous addiction leads our youth into habits of cigarettes, drugs, drink, brain-damage music and brain- dead television as surely as tugboats take tankers into open seas. I am talking about the addiction to sugar. A few years ago, my daughter Rachel's mother, who has always worked with young children, became convinced that sugar made the difference between a well-adjusted child and a problem child - between a child willing and wanting to learn and a child with no attention span.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | By Eils Lotozo, Special to The Inquirer
The world over, sweet things mark the stages and seasons of life. In America, it's candy for Halloween, chocolate eggs for Easter, cookies for Christmas, and cake for weddings, birthdays and anniversaries. In Mexico, brightly decorated sugar skulls are central to Day of the Dead festivities. In Eastern Europe, the exchange of decorated honey cakes is a courtship ritual, while in Japan, tiny candies shaped like flowers, leaves and insects are given to celebrate the changing seasons.
FOOD
December 18, 1991 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to the Inquirer
All living things must eat, and without the ability to distinguish what is good to eat from what is not, none of us would live very long. Through trial and error, we eventually collect foods that reflect not just our own taste, but the tastes of our culture. Sometimes it requires resolving apparent contradictions. Something, for example, has to tell us that smelly fish will make us sick but that smelly cheese will not. That's where the tongue, the nose and the brain work together, helping us decide that peanut butter really does go with chocolate, or that we should risk breaking family traditions with a carrot in the cacciatore or coriander on the holiday turkey.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2008
Q: I read your column about sweet potatoes and yams. My question: Can sweet potatoes and regular potatoes can be used interchangeably? - Speedy A: Calm down, Speedy - potatoes do take a while to cook, and you don't want to rush the enjoyment of eating them. Unless of course, there is a ball game on and you want to get back to the television. In fact, my favorite team is about to play, so I am going to give you a "speedy" answer. Basically, you can substitute sweet potatoes in any recipe that calls for russet potatoes.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
With tomato season nearly upon us, many a consumer soon will be scanning the shelves for specimens with that uniform hue of eye-catching red - a characteristic that shoppers have come to expect from modern agriculture. But in the quest for good looks, they likely are giving up something in the taste and nutrition department, according to new research published Friday in the journal Science. Tomatoes that have been bred to ripen with a uniform color contain up to 20 percent less sugar than their counterparts with green or yellow patches on the "shoulder" of the fruit, the researchers found after a genetic analysis.
FOOD
May 27, 2016
Makes 8 servings For the topping: 11/2 cups oats 1/2 cup unbleached white flour 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 cup butter plus 1 tablespoon for buttering pan 1/2 cup walnuts For the filling: 4 cups thinly sliced clean rhubarb stalks (discard leaves) 1/4 to 1/2 cup sugar Fresh strawberries for garnish (optional) Whipped cream for garnish (optional) Fresh mint for garnish (if desired) 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. In the work bowl of a food processor add oats, flour, 1/2 cup sugar, butter, and walnuts and process in pulses until well blended.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What they are: Doughnuts are a popular sweet treat. Who doesn't love a delicious lump of deep-fried dough, simply glazed with sugar or icing, or filled with sweet creme or fruit preserves? Entire franchises and chain restaurants have been built on the concept of selling pretty much nothing but the doughnut – and perhaps a good cup of coffee to go with it. But at the Jersey Shore, beloved outlets for doughnuts are usually of the smaller, more homespun genre. Like on the Ocean City boardwalk, where, rain or shine, hundreds of people will line up every summer morning - between 7 and 11 a.m. the queue often has more than 100 people in it - for doughnuts at Browns Restaurant between St. Charles Place and First Street.
FOOD
February 19, 2016
Makes 4 cups 1 1/2 cups packed dark brown sugar 1 cup kosher salt 1 cup ground espresso beans 1/4 cup freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup garlic powder 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon 2 tablespoons ground cumin 2 tablespoons cayenne pepper 1. Combine the sugar, salt, espresso beans, pepper, garlic powder, cinnamon, cumin, and cayenne in a resealable container, cover tightly, shake to combine. 2. Store in a cool, dry place. (Keeps for up to two months; after that, the coffee will start to taste stale.)
FOOD
June 10, 2016
Makes 6 servings 21/4 pounds strawberries, hulled 1 cup granulated sugar 1 vanilla bean, split in half lengthwise 2 strips of lemon peel 11/2 cups heavy cream 1/2 cup whole milk 4 medium egg yolks Equipment: Fine-mesh nylon sieve Ice cream maker Plastic freezer-safe container 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Put the strawberries in an ovenproof ceramic dish or a baking pan lined with parchment paper. Toss with ¼ cup of the sugar and tuck one half of the vanilla bean and the lemon peels in with the berries.
FOOD
February 19, 2016
Makes 2 cups 2 cups ketchup 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 2 tablespoons hard cider 2 tablespoons Pilsner beer 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 2 teaspoons Coleman's dry mustard powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1. In a large nonreactive saucepan, combine all the ingredients, bring to a simmer and cook, whisking occasionally,...
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