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Suicide

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Mariette Hartley, co-host of CBS's "The Morning Program," says she has a fear of success as a result of her father's committing suicide. He shot himself in the head in 1963. In an interview in the current issue of TV Guide, Hartley said that during the final week of rehearsals for the morning show, "when everything was coming together here, I kept hearing a gunshot. I was ashamed that no matter how far past it I get, when I am on the verge of success, there it is again. The gunshot.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Into every teen-age mind, the notion of suicide probably has intruded at some point. "If you go into any school and hand out a questionnaire, 100 percent would say they've thought of suicide," said Dr. Jerry Kaplan, Hahnemann University professor of clinical pediatrics. "There's no one who hasn't read 'Hamlet' and had it cross their mind. "To think about suicide is not abnormal. But when it gets to be an obsessive thing, that's when you get worried. " To be or not to be - when that becomes more than an academic exercise, parents, teachers and counselors worry.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Citing a nationwide increase in the number of suicides among adolescents, the Colonial school board has voted unanimously to adopt a suicide-prevention policy that orders the creation of a program to handle the problem. The board, acting at a meeting Thursday night, voted, 7-0, in favor of the one-page policy. Board members Rachele Intrieri and Frances L. Wilson were absent. The policy, which was recommended by the administration, states that the district "must" make every effort to reduce the adolescent suicide rate.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Loretta Tofani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Estes knows how he is going to kill himself. So does Alan Ward. Both have the AIDS virus and neither is sure he will want to live after the disease debilitates him, sapping his strength. So they are preparing for suicide. Opting for suicide is not unusual for people who have AIDS, according to interviews with people with the virus, physicians and mental health professionals. A study published in 1988 found that AIDS patients were 36 times more likely to take their own lives than the entire population of men 20 to 59 years old, the usual AIDS years, according to the study's leader, Dr. Peter Marzuk of Cornell University Medical College.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ministry and Stereolab were influenced by it. Michael Stipe sang its praises to Charlie Rose. Ric Ocasek and Ben Vaughn produced its members. And Bruce Springsteen has admiringly called it the scariest band he ever heard. If they don't already know Suicide - poet-singer Alan Vega and minimalist keyboardist Martin Rev - after 30 years, electronic-music fans have an opportunity to investigate the duo's brutish synth-punk mayhem with a pair of new two-CD packages from Mute Records.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Parents should pay close attention to teen-agers depressed by the suicide of Nirvana singer Kurt Cobain, especially those already troubled by other issues, counselors say. Rock stars "are not only role models, but they speak to emotions kids have trouble articulating," said Linda Rosenblum, a social worker with Los Angeles Unified School District's mental-health services. "When you're a teen-ager, you feel like you're so deep, and when someone comes along and sings what you feel, it's a big deal.
SPORTS
January 11, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Boston Bruins forward Sheldon Kennedy considered suicide as recently as this season over the sex abuse he suffered at the hands of his junior coach. "The last time was three months ago," he said yesterday. "I really thought about it. " He now sees a psychiatrist twice a week. Kennedy wants to set up a ranch near Vernon, British Columbia, for other sexually abused kids. A local businessman has given him land. Flyers star Eric Lindros also promised to help, Kennedy said.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | By Robert McSherry, Special to The Inquirer
An Upper Darby man who allegedly gave his despondent friend a loaded rifle and then stood by as the man killed himself Thursday night was charged yesterday under state law with taking part in a suicide, police said. Upper Darby Township police said William Neill, 42, of the 3200 block of Berkley Avenue, Drexel Hill, was pronounced dead of a single gunshot wound to the head about 10:45 p.m. Thursday at a home in the 3900 block of Mary Street, Drexel Hill. Neill's friend Gerald Samuel, 36, a resident of the house, was arraigned about 3 a.m. yesterday in Upper Darby Regional court on a charge of causing or aiding a suicide, police said.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Downingtown school officials began offering a crisis-intervention program for high school students this year, about one-third of the teenagers seeking help have asked to be talked out of committing suicide. According to the counselors and administrators in charge of the Downingtown Senior High School Student Assistance Services, the three-month-old program is reaching students the school never could reach before. During a meeting Wednesday of the Downingtown Area School District Board of Directors, board members heard a status report.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Cheryl Squadrito, Special to The Inquirer
Last spring, Decontrol's third independently released album was selling well. The hard-rock group from Media was considering a tour of Europe and hoping to attain a major label deal. Then a certain horror was thrown into the lives of the band: Bass player John Wolfinger, 30, committed suicide in April. The band members that remained, Adam Avery, Richard Birch and Chuck Yeager, decided that the spirit of Decontrol died with Wolfinger. The band broke up. Tonight, Decontrol will play its final performance as a group to benefit Survivors of Suicide, a nonprofit support group for loved ones left behind.
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NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
Police last year found Temple University student Agatha Hall in her North Philadelphia apartment with a gun beside her body, a gunshot wound to her head, and a bullet hole in the wall. Did the 21-year-old commit suicide, or was she killed? Lawyers began sparring over that question before a Common Pleas Court jury Wednesday as the murder trial began for Hall's former boyfriend, Brandon Meade. Prosecutors, led by Assistant District Attorney Andrew Notaristefano, have alleged that Meade, 30, fired his 9mm handgun at Hall, then staged the scene in her bedroom to look like a suicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Jim Carrey hit with lawsuit On Monday, Jim Carrey was hit with a wrongful-death lawsuit stemming from the September 2015 suicide of his ex-girlfriend Cathriona White . Filed in Los Angeles by White's widower, Mark Burton , the suit charges that the opioid painkillers White used to kill herself were illegally obtained by Carrey. The suit claims Carrey got the drugs under the assumed name Arthur King and gave them to White despite knowing she was "prone to depression and had previously attempted to take her own life.
NEWS
September 20, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM?GEEK
As Suicide Squad continues to inch up the all-time box-office charts, it has done one thing even its most fervent supporters could not have guessed. It has kept the DC movie universe afloat. I'm not kidding. And the reason for its massive success can be summed up in two words: Harley Quinn. Here's why: 1) Quinn is the character most people went to the movie to see. The only one close was Will Smith's Deadshot, and I don't see nearly as many Deadshot T-shirts, toys and comics being sold, do you?
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: When our neighbor moved in just over a year ago, she introduced herself and mentioned that her husband, who was in his late 30s, had died a year earlier. We've socialized with her quite a bit since then. She's amazing: seemingly not dwelling in the past or in the depths of despair. She has a huge circle of friends, and she speaks freely about her late husband, sharing anecdotes and the like. Neither my husband nor I have asked about her husband's death.
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
What does one troubled girl's suicide matter when weighed against the enormousness of an unfeeling universe? Quite a lot, if judged by the wealth of theatrical potency, musical skill, and humor displayed by César Alvarez's musical The Elementary Spacetime Show , a new work that, given a wide enough audience, will become Rent for the social-media generation. Alameda (Julia Louise) wants to die and chugs a handful of pills before singing the last verses of the show's opening number.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Burlington County woman and her son, killed by her husband in a murder-suicide this week, will be remembered at a memorial service Sunday. MaShanda Johnson, 48, of Burlington Township, and Ruben "Tré" Johnson III, 10, were shot by her husband, Ruben Johnson Jr., Monday night before he turned the gun on himself, authorities said. Authorities have not disclosed a possible motive for the killings, which stunned neighbors and friends. The couple had financial problems and a troubled marriage, friends say. Their $500,000 home on Sunflower Circle, purchased in 2005, was up for sheriff's sale in October, records say. Neighbors recalled MaShanda Johnson as a doting mother of two. A daughter, LoraVon, 23, lives in Florida.
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Melanie Burney and Michael Boren, STAFF WRITERS
Several years ago, Mashanda Johnson began warning a childhood friend that "if something ever happens to me, it's going to be Ruben. " Her worst fears came true Monday night in a quiet Burlington County town. Police say Ruben Johnson Jr., 50, fatally shot his wife, 48, and their son, 10, in the couple's Burlington Township home, and then turned the gun on himself. Moments before, Ruben Johnson had called his brother and said, "I just killed my family. I'm about to kill myself.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
A new law to help prevent suicide by students at New Jersey colleges brings needed attention to an important campus issue, school administrators said, while also giving them support to expand services. Gov. Christie last week signed into law the Madison Holleran Suicide Prevention Act, named after a 19-year-old University of Pennsylvania student from Bergen County who killed herself in 2014 in Philadelphia. "An institution of higher education shall have individuals with training and experience in mental-health issues who focus on reducing student suicides and attempted suicides available on campus or remotely by telephone or other means for students 24 hours a day, seven days a week," the law reads . The law also requires schools to train faculty and staff to recognize suicide warning signs and to email students each semester with contact information for the trained staffers.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Rob Tornoe, Staff Writer
Five family members, including a 2-year-old toddler, were found dead in their home in a small Pennsylvania town in what authorities are describing as an apparent murder-suicide. Authorities discovered the bodies Saturday afternoon in the family's home in the Berks County town of Sinking Spring, about 70 miles north of Philadelphia, according to the Berks County District Attorney's Office. The victims, who all died of gunshot wounds, were identified by the District Attorney's Office Sunday as Mark Short, 40, his wife, Megan, 33, and their children Lianna, 8, Mark Jr., 5, and Willow, 2. Officials say the family dog was also shot and killed.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
As DC Entertainment seems to once again, with Suicide Squad , have taken a film with promise and an appealing trailer and created a disappointing, at best, film, we should have seen this coming. In my opinion, the problem can be encapsulated in two words: Will Smith. Smith is not horrible by any means. But his character is one of the biggest badasses in the DC Comics Universe. Smith's Deadshot, however, is an assassin with a heart of gold. He spends more time talking about being a good role model for his daughter than he does being a villain with a hair-trigger temper.
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