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Suicide

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NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER MERION Like many who lose a loved one to suicide, the family and friends of Officer Sean Quinn said they didn't see it coming. Quinn, 46, was a veteran of the Lower Merion Police Department, a former DARE instructor who loved working with children. He was a private man with a strong jaw and youthful features. After a bumpy stretch, his life had smoothed out in recent years, and Quinn was doing what he loved - patrolling the streets. "It was all he ever wanted to do," said his wife, Eileen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Mariette Hartley, co-host of CBS's "The Morning Program," says she has a fear of success as a result of her father's committing suicide. He shot himself in the head in 1963. In an interview in the current issue of TV Guide, Hartley said that during the final week of rehearsals for the morning show, "when everything was coming together here, I kept hearing a gunshot. I was ashamed that no matter how far past it I get, when I am on the verge of success, there it is again. The gunshot.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Into every teen-age mind, the notion of suicide probably has intruded at some point. "If you go into any school and hand out a questionnaire, 100 percent would say they've thought of suicide," said Dr. Jerry Kaplan, Hahnemann University professor of clinical pediatrics. "There's no one who hasn't read 'Hamlet' and had it cross their mind. "To think about suicide is not abnormal. But when it gets to be an obsessive thing, that's when you get worried. " To be or not to be - when that becomes more than an academic exercise, parents, teachers and counselors worry.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Citing a nationwide increase in the number of suicides among adolescents, the Colonial school board has voted unanimously to adopt a suicide-prevention policy that orders the creation of a program to handle the problem. The board, acting at a meeting Thursday night, voted, 7-0, in favor of the one-page policy. Board members Rachele Intrieri and Frances L. Wilson were absent. The policy, which was recommended by the administration, states that the district "must" make every effort to reduce the adolescent suicide rate.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Loretta Tofani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Estes knows how he is going to kill himself. So does Alan Ward. Both have the AIDS virus and neither is sure he will want to live after the disease debilitates him, sapping his strength. So they are preparing for suicide. Opting for suicide is not unusual for people who have AIDS, according to interviews with people with the virus, physicians and mental health professionals. A study published in 1988 found that AIDS patients were 36 times more likely to take their own lives than the entire population of men 20 to 59 years old, the usual AIDS years, according to the study's leader, Dr. Peter Marzuk of Cornell University Medical College.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ministry and Stereolab were influenced by it. Michael Stipe sang its praises to Charlie Rose. Ric Ocasek and Ben Vaughn produced its members. And Bruce Springsteen has admiringly called it the scariest band he ever heard. If they don't already know Suicide - poet-singer Alan Vega and minimalist keyboardist Martin Rev - after 30 years, electronic-music fans have an opportunity to investigate the duo's brutish synth-punk mayhem with a pair of new two-CD packages from Mute Records.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Parents should pay close attention to teen-agers depressed by the suicide of Nirvana singer Kurt Cobain, especially those already troubled by other issues, counselors say. Rock stars "are not only role models, but they speak to emotions kids have trouble articulating," said Linda Rosenblum, a social worker with Los Angeles Unified School District's mental-health services. "When you're a teen-ager, you feel like you're so deep, and when someone comes along and sings what you feel, it's a big deal.
SPORTS
January 11, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Boston Bruins forward Sheldon Kennedy considered suicide as recently as this season over the sex abuse he suffered at the hands of his junior coach. "The last time was three months ago," he said yesterday. "I really thought about it. " He now sees a psychiatrist twice a week. Kennedy wants to set up a ranch near Vernon, British Columbia, for other sexually abused kids. A local businessman has given him land. Flyers star Eric Lindros also promised to help, Kennedy said.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | By Robert McSherry, Special to The Inquirer
An Upper Darby man who allegedly gave his despondent friend a loaded rifle and then stood by as the man killed himself Thursday night was charged yesterday under state law with taking part in a suicide, police said. Upper Darby Township police said William Neill, 42, of the 3200 block of Berkley Avenue, Drexel Hill, was pronounced dead of a single gunshot wound to the head about 10:45 p.m. Thursday at a home in the 3900 block of Mary Street, Drexel Hill. Neill's friend Gerald Samuel, 36, a resident of the house, was arraigned about 3 a.m. yesterday in Upper Darby Regional court on a charge of causing or aiding a suicide, police said.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Downingtown school officials began offering a crisis-intervention program for high school students this year, about one-third of the teenagers seeking help have asked to be talked out of committing suicide. According to the counselors and administrators in charge of the Downingtown Senior High School Student Assistance Services, the three-month-old program is reaching students the school never could reach before. During a meeting Wednesday of the Downingtown Area School District Board of Directors, board members heard a status report.
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NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Melanie Burney, and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
Adamant that the investigation was bungled, Mark Sheridan is preparing to challenge the ruling that his father, Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr., fatally stabbed his wife, set their home on fire, and killed himself. In the coming weeks, Sheridan, a prominent 41-year-old lawyer, plans to file a lawsuit in Superior Court in hopes of changing his father's manner of death, now listed as a suicide. The legal maneuver ventures into rarely charted legal waters in New Jersey - and provides no certainty that the family will prevail in clearing their father's name, experts say. Challenging the finding by the state Medical Examiner's Office and the Somerset County Prosecutor's Office may be not only an arduous task, but lengthy and costly.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Jonathan Tamari, Melanie Burney, and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
The four sons of Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife raised new questions Monday about their parents' death, and alleged that investigators botched the case from the beginning. In the latest round in a mounting public campaign seeking to prove that their parents were murdered, they released a letter to Somerset County Prosecutor Geoffrey D. Soriano accusing his office of ignoring evidence and hastily determining that the deaths were a murder-suicide. "All we want is the answers to what happened to our parents," one of the sons, Mark, said Monday during an interview at his Newark, N.J., law office.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
It sounded like a scene from a horror movie. A middle schooler comes home from playing basketball and finds his parents' bodies. Both are dead, both mutilated by a chainsaw. The gruesome murder-suicide in Lower Moreland on Tuesday orphaned the couple's three sons, and shocked a close-knit Montgomery County community that knew Nicole and Christopher Peppelmans as caring and attentive parents. Nicole Peppelman, 43, had also been choked and stabbed, coroner Walter Hofman said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IF ONLY IT were a police officer, a family friend or uncle, any adult in the world who could have found them instead, and spared a boy from a horror he'll never forget. The eldest son of Christopher and Nicole Peppelman was alone, though, when he found his parents dead Tuesday afternoon, a bloody chain saw beside them in the Lower Moreland, Montgomery County, house where they'd once been happy. He's 14 and has two little brothers. Now it's up to the adults who are still here to help get him through it, because it's probably too late to lie about it. "I'm not ever sure there's an adult explanation for this tragedy," said the Rev. Eric Carswell of the Bryn Athyn Church, where the two younger Peppelman boys attend school.
NEWS
March 29, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Jonathan Tamari, Angelo Fichera, and Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writers
Prosecutor's Conclusions John Sheridan had five wounds - including three stab wounds - to neck and torso area. One wound to the neck perforated the jugular. He also had five broken ribs, consistent with a piece of an armoire falling on top of him. John Sheridan's cause and manner of death: "Sharp force injuries and smoke inhalation. " Suicide. Carbon-monoxide levels in his blood indicated he was alive after starting the fire. Joyce Sheridan's wounds: Eight stab wounds to the head - including three stab wounds - and a stab wound to the chest.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is something no teachers or school administrators ever want to experience, but a reality that they must be prepared to confront: the death of a student. And while most student deaths are from accidents or illness, in a recent federal study suicide was found to be the No. 3 cause of death among those 10 to 14 years old. Schools all over the nation have been searching for ways to prevent it. In an incident that gained international attention, last week the prestigious Shipley School, in the heart of the Main Line, was forced to come to grips with tragedy when the body of eighth grader Cayman Naib was found on the grounds of his Newtown Square home, dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
MARY PITTS-DEVINE is a survivor. She beat breast cancer and had a kidney transplant, all through God's grace, her LinkedIn profile says. Now, Pitts-Devine, 46, is fighting for her life once more. She remained in critical condition last night at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, where she was taken Sunday after her neighbor ambushed her with a gun before turning the weapon on himself, police sources said. Just before 11 a.m., Steven Outlaw confronted Pitts-Devine inside the first-floor stairwell of their apartment building on Spruce Street near 45th in Spruce Hill, a normally quiet section of West Philly.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It should be no secret by now that having guns in the home increases the chances that a member of the family will kill himself or herself. But the extent of the increase may surprise some people. In a study of adults, epidemiologist Douglas Wiebe found that the risk of suicide is three times higher for people who have a gun in the home than for people without guns. Guns in the home also raise the risk of homicide and accidental deaths. "The bottom line is that people with a gun in the home are more likely to die by suicide than other people," said Wiebe, who studies risks associated with gun ownership at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
I FOUND OUT that my brother had committed suicide from my mother. It was hard, particularly when I saw how devastated and small she looked sitting on the living room couch, as if the life had been siphoned from her in one inhuman pull. But the way that I found out was nothing compared to the way she'd learned of his death about an hour before: a telephone call from a kind, but anonymous police officer who'd investigated the death. There was no gentle preparation from a family member, no call from a priest or nun, nothing but the cold news that her middle child had died by his own hand in his adopted hometown in Massachusetts.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The family of Thomas French, a Bucks County man who killed himself amid allegations that he and his wife, a prominent Republican fund-raiser, committed a $20 million insurance fraud, maintained his innocence Friday and said, "The facts will prove him right. " The statement was the family's first comment since French's suicide Thursday afternoon at the Buckingham house he shared with wife Claire Risoldi. Bucks County Coroner Joseph Campbell said Friday that French died from a gunshot wound to the head.
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