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Suicide

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boy Interrupted is a remarkable, deeply unsettling documentary about the life of Evan Perry, an uncommonly bright, talented boy from New York who committed suicide at age 15. It's all the more revealing, disturbing - and not a little bizarre - since it was made by the boy's parents, the husband-and-wife filmmaking team of Dana and Hart Perry. An educated, articulate couple, the Perrys seem to have documented every waking moment of their children's lives, which means we are given unprecedented firsthand footage of Evan literally from the moment he emerges from the womb to the weeks before his fatal jump from a window in his family's apartment in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Mariette Hartley, co-host of CBS's "The Morning Program," says she has a fear of success as a result of her father's committing suicide. He shot himself in the head in 1963. In an interview in the current issue of TV Guide, Hartley said that during the final week of rehearsals for the morning show, "when everything was coming together here, I kept hearing a gunshot. I was ashamed that no matter how far past it I get, when I am on the verge of success, there it is again. The gunshot.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Into every teen-age mind, the notion of suicide probably has intruded at some point. "If you go into any school and hand out a questionnaire, 100 percent would say they've thought of suicide," said Dr. Jerry Kaplan, Hahnemann University professor of clinical pediatrics. "There's no one who hasn't read 'Hamlet' and had it cross their mind. "To think about suicide is not abnormal. But when it gets to be an obsessive thing, that's when you get worried. " To be or not to be - when that becomes more than an academic exercise, parents, teachers and counselors worry.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Citing a nationwide increase in the number of suicides among adolescents, the Colonial school board has voted unanimously to adopt a suicide-prevention policy that orders the creation of a program to handle the problem. The board, acting at a meeting Thursday night, voted, 7-0, in favor of the one-page policy. Board members Rachele Intrieri and Frances L. Wilson were absent. The policy, which was recommended by the administration, states that the district "must" make every effort to reduce the adolescent suicide rate.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Loretta Tofani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Estes knows how he is going to kill himself. So does Alan Ward. Both have the AIDS virus and neither is sure he will want to live after the disease debilitates him, sapping his strength. So they are preparing for suicide. Opting for suicide is not unusual for people who have AIDS, according to interviews with people with the virus, physicians and mental health professionals. A study published in 1988 found that AIDS patients were 36 times more likely to take their own lives than the entire population of men 20 to 59 years old, the usual AIDS years, according to the study's leader, Dr. Peter Marzuk of Cornell University Medical College.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ministry and Stereolab were influenced by it. Michael Stipe sang its praises to Charlie Rose. Ric Ocasek and Ben Vaughn produced its members. And Bruce Springsteen has admiringly called it the scariest band he ever heard. If they don't already know Suicide - poet-singer Alan Vega and minimalist keyboardist Martin Rev - after 30 years, electronic-music fans have an opportunity to investigate the duo's brutish synth-punk mayhem with a pair of new two-CD packages from Mute Records.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Parents should pay close attention to teen-agers depressed by the suicide of Nirvana singer Kurt Cobain, especially those already troubled by other issues, counselors say. Rock stars "are not only role models, but they speak to emotions kids have trouble articulating," said Linda Rosenblum, a social worker with Los Angeles Unified School District's mental-health services. "When you're a teen-ager, you feel like you're so deep, and when someone comes along and sings what you feel, it's a big deal.
SPORTS
January 11, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Boston Bruins forward Sheldon Kennedy considered suicide as recently as this season over the sex abuse he suffered at the hands of his junior coach. "The last time was three months ago," he said yesterday. "I really thought about it. " He now sees a psychiatrist twice a week. Kennedy wants to set up a ranch near Vernon, British Columbia, for other sexually abused kids. A local businessman has given him land. Flyers star Eric Lindros also promised to help, Kennedy said.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | By Robert McSherry, Special to The Inquirer
An Upper Darby man who allegedly gave his despondent friend a loaded rifle and then stood by as the man killed himself Thursday night was charged yesterday under state law with taking part in a suicide, police said. Upper Darby Township police said William Neill, 42, of the 3200 block of Berkley Avenue, Drexel Hill, was pronounced dead of a single gunshot wound to the head about 10:45 p.m. Thursday at a home in the 3900 block of Mary Street, Drexel Hill. Neill's friend Gerald Samuel, 36, a resident of the house, was arraigned about 3 a.m. yesterday in Upper Darby Regional court on a charge of causing or aiding a suicide, police said.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Downingtown school officials began offering a crisis-intervention program for high school students this year, about one-third of the teenagers seeking help have asked to be talked out of committing suicide. According to the counselors and administrators in charge of the Downingtown Senior High School Student Assistance Services, the three-month-old program is reaching students the school never could reach before. During a meeting Wednesday of the Downingtown Area School District Board of Directors, board members heard a status report.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IN THE WEEKS leading up to Laura Araujo's slaying, Jeremiah Jakson's life seemed to be spiraling out of control. Or he was on the cusp of greatness. It depended on the day and the hour, but it was all on display on Jakson's Facebook page, a constant barrage of selfies, street cliches and grandiose delusions. The spotlight-grabbing narcissist is the polar opposite of Araujo, 23, a shy college grad who never wanted much attention. "Im a good dude at heart but im done being a good dude," Jakson wrote on June 26. Jakson, 22, was a security guard with AlliedBarton Security Services, but was fired last month for performance reasons.
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kim Dorwart wants to give folks something to talk about: hope. Mental illness, she said, can't be a "dirty little secret" anymore. Dorwart, whose daughter Vanessa took her life in 2010, was joined by thousands at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Saturday evening. They gathered to kick off the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention's Out of the Darkness Walk, a 17-mile overnight journey. This is the first year the all-nighter has been held in Philadelphia, said Bob Gebbia, chief executive officer of AFSP.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT'S BEEN a little more than a year since Judy Tripathi lost her son to suicide. She can remember every one of those days, because they've all been a struggle, filled with grief for Sunil, a Brown University student who committed suicide last year. He is remembered for having been falsely identified as a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing. Tomorrow she'll have support. Tripathi is one of 2,000 people expected to attend Out of the Darkness, a 17-mile walk to benefit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  In a county where suicide incidents had risen disturbingly, the Delaware County Crisis Connections Team opened its doors a little less than a year ago. More than 1,300 calls later - many involving people who said they were contemplating suicide - the team evidently has become a valuable resource for county residents struggling with mental illness, as well as their families and the community. The callers' ages have ranged from 3 to 93. "It is almost like we are mediators in a conversation that hasn't been going well for a while," said Maria Sciarrino, one of the mobile crisis specialists who respond to the calls.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
MACHELLE NELSON should've been there yesterday as her family gathered on the East Germantown block where she grew up. She wouldn't have missed a family get-together for the world. But Nelson, a mother of four and grandmother to five, was painfully absent from the rowhouse on Clearview Street near Washington Lane, where her close-knit family came together to mourn her tragic death. Nelson, who would have turned 60 this month, was on the couch in her sister's living room Tuesday watching reality TV when her estranged husband, Mark Nelson, walked in the door, pointed a gun at her and fired four shots before pressing the barrel to his own head and pulling the trigger.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A CENTER CITY lawyer who masterminded a seven-year slip-and-fall racket that bilked insurance firms out of nearly $400,000 evaded arrest by committing suicide, District Attorney Seth Williams said yesterday. Andrew H. Gaber, 52, of Delaware County, shot himself to death last week. He was scheduled to be arrested yesterday as a result of a nearly two-year grand-jury investigation that ensnared him and dozens of others whom he lured into helping him rip off some 21 insurance companies.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Maxwell played varsity lacrosse, football, and basketball at Radnor High School. He was a member of the National Honor Society. He had a great sense of humor, and girls at school had crushes on him. Maxwell graduated in June. In July, he killed himself. The end of his quiet struggle with depression shocked his Main Line community. "At his memorial service, we talked about how we couldn't talk about it when he was sick," said his mother, Laurie Burstein-Maxwell. "His friends didn't know the extent of what was going on, and neither did our friends, because of the stigma.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane said Monday afternoon that she would not appeal a judge's decision to dismiss assisted-suicide charges against Philadelphia nurse Barbara Mancini in a case closely watched by people who were concerned the state had intruded on a private family matter. Mancini, 58, was charged last year with assisted suicide for handing her 93-year-old father his morphine. Schuylkill County Court Judge Jacqueline Russell on Feb. 11 dismissed the case against Mancini, claiming the Office of the Attorney General had based its case on conjecture and lack of evidence.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IT'S BEEN A MONTH since Penn freshman Madison Holleran died by suicide. An athletic and academic standout in high school, she had been dismayed by her 3.5 grade-point average at Penn and had struggled to balance her studies with her varsity track training. By Jan. 17, she was so despondent, she took her life. Three weeks later, Penn sophomore Elvis Hatcher did the same. Both suicides ignited much debate about the life-or-death pressures of college life (particularly in the Ivy League)
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Mancini, speaking out for the first time, described the afternoon when she was arrested for assisted suicide, and when her father was revived against his wishes, as "a surreal nightmare. " "I just couldn't believe it," she recounted Wednesday, the day after a Schuylkill County judge dismissed the yearlong case against her. "It didn't seem like this could possibly be happening to me or to him. Absolutely the worst thing in the world. " Schuylkill County Judge Jacqueline Russell said the attorney general's case rested on conjecture and lacked evidence.
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