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Suicide

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boy Interrupted is a remarkable, deeply unsettling documentary about the life of Evan Perry, an uncommonly bright, talented boy from New York who committed suicide at age 15. It's all the more revealing, disturbing - and not a little bizarre - since it was made by the boy's parents, the husband-and-wife filmmaking team of Dana and Hart Perry. An educated, articulate couple, the Perrys seem to have documented every waking moment of their children's lives, which means we are given unprecedented firsthand footage of Evan literally from the moment he emerges from the womb to the weeks before his fatal jump from a window in his family's apartment in 2005.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The family of Thomas French, a Bucks County man who killed himself amid allegations that he and his wife, a prominent Republican fund-raiser, committed a $20 million insurance fraud, maintained his innocence Friday and said, "The facts will prove him right. " The statement was the family's first comment since French's suicide Thursday afternoon at the Buckingham house he shared with wife Claire Risoldi. Bucks County Coroner Joseph Campbell said Friday that French died from a gunshot wound to the head.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Mariette Hartley, co-host of CBS's "The Morning Program," says she has a fear of success as a result of her father's committing suicide. He shot himself in the head in 1963. In an interview in the current issue of TV Guide, Hartley said that during the final week of rehearsals for the morning show, "when everything was coming together here, I kept hearing a gunshot. I was ashamed that no matter how far past it I get, when I am on the verge of success, there it is again. The gunshot.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
FIRST, there's a thump. Then - lightning fast - a crunch. The inhuman sound erupted moments after Richard Dixon jerked the emergency brake on the train he was operating. Right away, he knew what it was - the sound of a body being crushed beneath his train. It was a 17-year-old boy. "It's really hard to describe," the engineer said, recalling the suicide that unfolded a decade ago as his Regional Rail train barreled north from Jenkintown toward Warminster. "You just know it - and you don't forget it. " For 15 people, trains speeding along the city's railroads have been a gruesome, but easily accessible, means of killing themselves over the past five years.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Martha Mendoza, Associated Press
SARATOGA, Calif. - Fifteen-year-old Audrie Pott passed out drunk at a friend's house, woke up, and realized she had been sexually abused. In the days that followed, she was shocked to see an explicit photo of herself circulating among her classmates along with e-mails and text messages about the episode. And she was horrified to discover that her attackers were three of her friends, her family's lawyer says. Eight days after the party, she hanged herself. "She pieced together with e-mails and texts who had done this to her. They were her friends.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Into every teen-age mind, the notion of suicide probably has intruded at some point. "If you go into any school and hand out a questionnaire, 100 percent would say they've thought of suicide," said Dr. Jerry Kaplan, Hahnemann University professor of clinical pediatrics. "There's no one who hasn't read 'Hamlet' and had it cross their mind. "To think about suicide is not abnormal. But when it gets to be an obsessive thing, that's when you get worried. " To be or not to be - when that becomes more than an academic exercise, parents, teachers and counselors worry.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Citing a nationwide increase in the number of suicides among adolescents, the Colonial school board has voted unanimously to adopt a suicide-prevention policy that orders the creation of a program to handle the problem. The board, acting at a meeting Thursday night, voted, 7-0, in favor of the one-page policy. Board members Rachele Intrieri and Frances L. Wilson were absent. The policy, which was recommended by the administration, states that the district "must" make every effort to reduce the adolescent suicide rate.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Loretta Tofani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dan Estes knows how he is going to kill himself. So does Alan Ward. Both have the AIDS virus and neither is sure he will want to live after the disease debilitates him, sapping his strength. So they are preparing for suicide. Opting for suicide is not unusual for people who have AIDS, according to interviews with people with the virus, physicians and mental health professionals. A study published in 1988 found that AIDS patients were 36 times more likely to take their own lives than the entire population of men 20 to 59 years old, the usual AIDS years, according to the study's leader, Dr. Peter Marzuk of Cornell University Medical College.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ministry and Stereolab were influenced by it. Michael Stipe sang its praises to Charlie Rose. Ric Ocasek and Ben Vaughn produced its members. And Bruce Springsteen has admiringly called it the scariest band he ever heard. If they don't already know Suicide - poet-singer Alan Vega and minimalist keyboardist Martin Rev - after 30 years, electronic-music fans have an opportunity to investigate the duo's brutish synth-punk mayhem with a pair of new two-CD packages from Mute Records.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Parents should pay close attention to teen-agers depressed by the suicide of Nirvana singer Kurt Cobain, especially those already troubled by other issues, counselors say. Rock stars "are not only role models, but they speak to emotions kids have trouble articulating," said Linda Rosenblum, a social worker with Los Angeles Unified School District's mental-health services. "When you're a teen-ager, you feel like you're so deep, and when someone comes along and sings what you feel, it's a big deal.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The family of Thomas French, a Bucks County man who killed himself amid allegations that he and his wife, a prominent Republican fund-raiser, committed a $20 million insurance fraud, maintained his innocence Friday and said, "The facts will prove him right. " The statement was the family's first comment since French's suicide Thursday afternoon at the Buckingham house he shared with wife Claire Risoldi. Bucks County Coroner Joseph Campbell said Friday that French died from a gunshot wound to the head.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Money may not buy you love, but lack of money is so rough on the psyche that it's life-threatening. A new study led by a University of Pennsylvania professor found that economic turmoil in Greece correlated with an increase in suicides for both men and women. Researchers from Penn, Greece, and Scotland analyzed month-by-month data on 11,505 suicides from 1983 through 2012. Charles Branas, a Penn epidemiologist, said previous studies had found more suicides during rough economic periods.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite repeatedly placing her on suicide watch, the York County (Pa.) Prison failed to properly monitor an Antiguan immigrant with chronic schizophrenia who managed to hang herself in her cell 15 months ago, according to federal investigators. The review - obtained last week by The Inquirer - also points to the shared responsibility of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in managing care for Tiombe Kimana Carlos. It states that just days before Carlos' death in October 2013 - and two months after the 34-year-old had made another bid to hang herself in a cell - a deputy prison warden had asked ICE to consider placing her in a psychiatric facility.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the night before he died, 15-year-old Adnan "Ado" Halkic was texting with his dad, excited about the next day's Rose Bowl game between Florida State and Oregon. "He loved the Oregon Ducks," Adam Halkic recalled this week. "He said, 'Dad, let's get some wings. We'll watch it together.' " It was New Year's Eve. His parents and 19-year-old sister were driving to a party in Pennsylvania, but Ado declined, saying he would watch the ball drop at home on TV. He finished his text with "Happy New Year" and "I love you, too, Dad. " When the family returned to its Burlington Township home about 11:30 p.m., he joked with his father that "tomorrow is the Ducks' day," and headed to his room.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the wake of two student suicides in four days, the Burlington Township School District brought counselors into the high school Tuesday to assist students with their grieving and guard against further loss. School administrators gathered all staff and high school students Tuesday "to talk . . . and come together," according to Liz Scott, the district's spokeswoman. "Counseling was offered throughout the day in safe zones" around the building, she said. Children in lower grades who sought assistance also received counseling.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE FINAL MOMENTS of Marques Johnson's life felt like an unexpected plot twist to his family - a sad and confusing ending to an otherwise normal story of a young, hardworking dad they say had never been in trouble before. So the family all sat together in the living room of their home in Pennsauken, N.J., rewinding his life, trying to figure out what they missed or what they could have done to prevent him from shooting his ex-girlfriend and her father with a shotgun Saturday morning before using the gun to take his own life outside Cooper University Hospital.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a year ago, Philadelphia Police Chaplain Luis Centeno was approached by Stephen McWilliams, who teaches a social documentary film class at Villanova University. McWilliams was initially interested in profiling the chaplain, but as they talked, both began to see a more meaningful project - about a dark secret, one few law enforcement officers are willing to openly talk about. Suicide. The collaboration led to this to the release this fall of BLUE , a 40-minute documentary chronicling the occupational hazards of the job, and a related app to help officers identify and address the signs.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alexander Harriman, 11, who since Sunday had been the sole survivor of an attempted murder-suicide that took the lives of his two siblings and mother, died Wednesday afternoon at Cooper University Hospital, authorities said. He and his sister, Nadia, 8, and brother, Nicholas, 14, were shot by their mother Thursday in her bedroom in Tabernacle Township, Burlington County, police said. Jeaninne LePage, 44, then shot herself in the head with a revolver. LePage died Sunday at Cooper.
NEWS
November 26, 2014
ISSUE | PRIORITIES Party, not study? Isn't it ironic that city politicos are assuring one and all that, if the Democratic Party honors Philadelphia with its 2016 convention, they will have no problem raising millions to fund the event ("Asking donors to back '16 bid," Nov. 17)? At the same time, no one seems able to fund the education of the future participants in the electoral process. It seems to me that our priorities are just a little askew. |Lynne M. Roberts, Philadelphia Easy money The world is going to hell, and yet Philadelphia and other cities and states are fighting to have more casinos built.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Why young people take their lives remains a mystery. Even known risk factors - such as a history of suicide attempts, a family history of suicide or mental illness, substance abuse, recent stress, and easy access to lethal methods - can't always explain such a tragedy. Nor does having risk factors mean someone will commit suicide. But one thing is clear: Prevention methods, including greater awareness by teachers, parents, and friends, can help reduce suicidal behaviors. The Pennsylvania Child Death Review team investigates the circumstances around a child's death and what factors might have prevented it. Of the deaths reviewed in 2011, local teams found 86 percent of suicide deaths were preventable, says Erich Batra, co-chair of the Pennsylvania Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative and medical director of the review team.
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