CollectionsSuicide Prevention
IN THE NEWS

Suicide Prevention

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 19, 2010 | By NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
DEATH BY SUICIDE can take only moments, but its aftershocks last forever. That's what Susan Kelleher learned six years ago when her 22-year-old son, Jake, ended his life. "It never goes away," said Kelleher, of Phoenixville. "You never stop thinking about it. Suicide grief is just so unbelievable. " Every year, more Americans lose family and friends to suicide than to homicide. According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, more than 34,000 Americans committed suicide in 2007, a number that has remained steady for years.
NEWS
November 24, 2003 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talking about it still brings tears. But if Rachel Sherman learned anything from the years of depression, the botched suicide attempt, and the ensuing shame, she learned that talking is the only way to make things better. So yesterday, Sherman stood in front of 100 people, telling her story at the Southern New Jersey Children and Family Services and Katz Jewish Community Center's annual community conference. The suburb was eager to listen to the 20-year-old daughter of School Superintendent Morton Sherman.
NEWS
November 23, 2004 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aborting the trial shortly before the case was to go to a federal jury, the City of Philadelphia yesterday agreed to pay $3.5 million to settle the lawsuit filed on behalf of a prostitute left severely impaired after he hanged himself in a police cell. The settlement between the city and the family of Christopher Foster, 27, was announced after city officials asked for a recess following closing arguments by Foster's attorney in a trial that began last Tuesday. Officials in the City Solicitor's Office could not be reached for comment on the reason for the sudden decision to settle the lawsuit.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The decision to take one's own life is both excruciatingly personal and impersonally demographical. Someone who is in a deep depression may reach a point of hopelessness at the same moment he happens to pass by a bridge, leading to an impulsive, tragic decision that even he may not have foreseen. On the other hand, societal trends are well-known: elderly people commit suicide at rates that are 50 percent higher than young people, whites nearly three times more than blacks, men nearly four times more than women.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
It takes four seconds to jump from the Golden Gate Bridge to the bay below, and Kevin Hines remembers every one of them. On Sept. 25, 2000, Hines, then 19, took a bus to the San Francisco landmark, and gobbled down a last meal of Skittles and Starbursts. He walked around for a while, sobbing and hallucinating, hoping someone would notice and stop him. After a German tourist asked if he would take her picture, Hines hurdled the orange railing and sped toward the water at 75 mph, tears plastered across his face.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Burlington County woman and her son, killed by her husband in a murder-suicide this week, will be remembered at a memorial service Sunday. MaShanda Johnson, 48, of Burlington Township, and Ruben "Tré" Johnson III, 10, were shot by her husband, Ruben Johnson Jr., Monday night before he turned the gun on himself, authorities said. Authorities have not disclosed a possible motive for the killings, which stunned neighbors and friends. The couple had financial problems and a troubled marriage, friends say. Their $500,000 home on Sunflower Circle, purchased in 2005, was up for sheriff's sale in October, records say. Neighbors recalled MaShanda Johnson as a doting mother of two. A daughter, LoraVon, 23, lives in Florida.
NEWS
September 22, 1986
As co-directors of Youth Suicide Prevention at Albert Einstein Medical Center, we write to comment on the Sept. 11 report that teenage suicide appears to be increased by "television news reports and fictional made-for- TV movies dealing with suicide. " We are concerned that emphasizing associations between suicide in the news or television shows with subsequent acts of suicide will lead parents and educators to the false conclusion that suicide-prevention programs should be halted.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Why young people take their lives remains a mystery. Even known risk factors - such as a history of suicide attempts, a family history of suicide or mental illness, substance abuse, recent stress, and easy access to lethal methods - can't always explain such a tragedy. Nor does having risk factors mean someone will commit suicide. But one thing is clear: Prevention methods, including greater awareness by teachers, parents, and friends, can help reduce suicidal behaviors. The Pennsylvania Child Death Review team investigates the circumstances around a child's death and what factors might have prevented it. Of the deaths reviewed in 2011, local teams found 86 percent of suicide deaths were preventable, says Erich Batra, co-chair of the Pennsylvania Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative and medical director of the review team.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christopher Aiello broke into tears - again - when he got a call last month about Madison Holleran, a promising scholar-athlete at the University of Pennsylvania who jumped to her death from a Center City parking garage, stunning her family, friends, and campus community. The call came from a friend, who in an eerie coincidence, knew Holleran's father. Aiello lost his own daughter, Paige, the same way nine months earlier. Tennis team captain and an A student at the College of New Jersey, she was weeks shy of graduation and had been accepted to nine law schools when her body was recovered from the Hudson River.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Burlington County woman and her son, killed by her husband in a murder-suicide this week, will be remembered at a memorial service Sunday. MaShanda Johnson, 48, of Burlington Township, and Ruben "Tré" Johnson III, 10, were shot by her husband, Ruben Johnson Jr., Monday night before he turned the gun on himself, authorities said. Authorities have not disclosed a possible motive for the killings, which stunned neighbors and friends. The couple had financial problems and a troubled marriage, friends say. Their $500,000 home on Sunflower Circle, purchased in 2005, was up for sheriff's sale in October, records say. Neighbors recalled MaShanda Johnson as a doting mother of two. A daughter, LoraVon, 23, lives in Florida.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
It takes four seconds to jump from the Golden Gate Bridge to the bay below, and Kevin Hines remembers every one of them. On Sept. 25, 2000, Hines, then 19, took a bus to the San Francisco landmark, and gobbled down a last meal of Skittles and Starbursts. He walked around for a while, sobbing and hallucinating, hoping someone would notice and stop him. After a German tourist asked if he would take her picture, Hines hurdled the orange railing and sped toward the water at 75 mph, tears plastered across his face.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
It might be be "Overkill," but musician Colin Hay is asking folks coming to his concert Saturday to spiff it up a bit. "I don't want any shorts in the front row," he said. The Scottish-Australian singer/songwriter, perhaps best known as the lead vocalist of Men at Work, will perform at 8 p.m. at the Keswick Theatre (291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside). He wouldn't share details of the performance, but it will feature stuff from his 12th solo album, "Next Year People. " He promised that if you make the effort, he will.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is a reason Philadelphia's most prominent paparazzo - his Philly Chit Chat blog gets more than 5,000 visits a day - is one of the kindest souls you could ever meet. It's because HughE Dillon, who has made a career of photographing celebrities, knows kindness saves lives. Kindness saved his life each time he attempted to end it. And there were three tries. So Dillon, 52, will receive the Lifesaver Award at the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention 's annual gala on Saturday at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Pennsylvania and other states should consider legislation similar to a New Jersey proposal that could help prevent suicides among college students. The Madison Holleran Suicide Prevention and Proper Reporting Acts have been approved by the state Senate Higher Education Committee and are awaiting action by the full Senate. They're named for a 19-year-old University of Pennsylvania freshman who jumped off a parking garage near the school last year. One of the two bills would require colleges to make individuals trained in suicide prevention available to students on campus or by phone 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
GEORGE WAS the first openly gay man I knew. But over the years, I often wondered if the George I knew as a kid was the same man others did, the ones at the other end of a morning cab ride he'd take from my aunt's neighborhood in the Bronx to his job - in banking, I think - somewhere in Manhattan. I'd watch him as he got into the cab, always in a suit, serious and reserved as he folded his huge frame into the back seat and told the driver where to go. At the end of the workday, another cab would drop him off and I'd watch again as he'd disappear into his apartment only to emerge shortly after in the outfit he favored in the summer: jean shorts, a colorful tank top, and chancletas - sandals that punctuated every step as he made his way to my aunt's apartment.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It should be no secret by now that having guns in the home increases the chances that a member of the family will kill himself or herself. But the extent of the increase may surprise some people. In a study of adults, epidemiologist Douglas Wiebe found that the risk of suicide is three times higher for people who have a gun in the home than for people without guns. Guns in the home also raise the risk of homicide and accidental deaths. "The bottom line is that people with a gun in the home are more likely to die by suicide than other people," said Wiebe, who studies risks associated with gun ownership at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Why young people take their lives remains a mystery. Even known risk factors - such as a history of suicide attempts, a family history of suicide or mental illness, substance abuse, recent stress, and easy access to lethal methods - can't always explain such a tragedy. Nor does having risk factors mean someone will commit suicide. But one thing is clear: Prevention methods, including greater awareness by teachers, parents, and friends, can help reduce suicidal behaviors. The Pennsylvania Child Death Review team investigates the circumstances around a child's death and what factors might have prevented it. Of the deaths reviewed in 2011, local teams found 86 percent of suicide deaths were preventable, says Erich Batra, co-chair of the Pennsylvania Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative and medical director of the review team.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
DOZENS OF young men and women filed into a second-floor room at the University of Pennsylvania yesterday afternoon, carrying backpacks and an extra, heavier burden. Later, as they left the room in small groups, many wiped away tears, and most declined to comment on the death of Amanda Hu, 20, a Penn student who police say died of an apparent suicide on Sunday night. Police arrived at the home Hu shared with several other Penn students on Sansom Street near 40th at 11:29 p.m. Sunday and found her unconscious on the floor of her second-floor bedroom.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
ISSUE | PUBLIC HEALTH Other shoes to drop CVS Pharmacy has discontinued the sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products. It is rare for any business to sacrifice revenue for the public's benefit. I salute them. But other retailers, including Wawa, continue to sell tobacco, which is known to cause cancer, heart disease, pulmonary illness, and eventually death. Wawa should do the right thing and drop tobacco. |Myles Gordon, Philadelphia Needling consumers Recently, I drove by my local pharmacy and counted displays for at least a dozen lawn signs for at least five different vaccines or diseases.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|