CollectionsSukkot
IN THE NEWS

Sukkot

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 23, 1986 | By Marlene A. Prost, Special to The Inquirer
There was little room for a sukkah behind the crowded rowhouses in South Philadelphia when Min Lazaroff, 76, was growing up at South Second and Moore Streets. But Lazaroff, now a resident of Martins Run life-care community in Marple, remembers how her grandfather, a scholarly Russian Jew, managed to build a sukkah - or wooden-framed hut - in his back yard every fall in celebration of Sukkot of Feast of Tabernacles, an ancient Jewish holiday marking the autumnal harvest. In accordance with tradition, he and his wife ate every meal in the tiny structure, by the light of candles held by brass candlesticks, as their children and grandchildren stored the images in their memories.
FOOD
September 27, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Having welcomed a New Year and a fresh start at Rosh Hashanah, repented on Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement) and been forgiven our sins, it is time to celebrate. Sukkot, the harvest festival that is among the oldest and most joyous of Jewish holidays, began at sunset last night and continues for seven days, followed by two separate days of prayer and celebration - Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah. During Sukkot, meals are eaten in a sukkah , a temporary outdoor structure open to the sky and the elements though shaded by greenery and adorned with fruits of the harvest, a reminder of huts used by the Israelites while wandering the desert in search of the Promised Land.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2011
THE HARVEST season typically brings beer lovers classic German-style Oktoberfestbier, newfangled American pumpkin brews and ale made with freshly picked hops. In one small corner of the world, though, harvest time means etrog beer. Or, as David Cohen, owner of Tel Aviv's Dancing Camel Brewing Co. and inventor of this unusual style, says, "When you're done shaking 'em, we start baking 'em. " Maybe you need to know a little about Jewish tradition to understand the humor, so here goes: The etrog is a fragrant, yellow, thick-skinned citrus fruit grown mainly in Israel, Italy, Yemen and Morocco.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
In honor of the Jewish holiday Sukkot, groups of students at the University of Pennsylvania will construct and decorate small huts across campus this weekend. The first-time initiative, called "Sukkathon 2012," was inspired by the traditional holiday practice of building outdoor huts before the celebration of Sukkot. The huts, or "sukkahs," are built each holiday in homage to humble dwellings used by the Israelites during their 40-year trek through the desert following the exodus from Egypt.
FOOD
October 14, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Certain foods have become associated with specific holiday traditions, both religious and secular. Thanksgiving sparks Norman Rockwell images of turkeys, and Easter summons pictures of delicious lamb. Mention the Fourth of July, and the mind conjures up images of sizzling hamburgers and hot dogs. But how many holidays tell us where we must eat? There's at least one. It is the Jewish celebration of Sukkot, which began at sundown last Wednesday and ends at sundown tomorrow. For the eight days of this holiday, Jews are commanded to take their meals in a sukkah - an outdoor, temporary, hutlike structure.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | For The Inquirer / LAURENCE KESTERSON
As part of Sukkot celebrations at Beth David Reform Congregation in Gladwyne, Abbye Caplan tied a decoration to the outdoor sukkah on the temple grounds yesterday. Sukkot, the Jewish harvest festival, is being celebrated this week.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | Photos by G. Loie Grossmann/ Daily News
The Sukkot holiday for residents of the Golden Slipper Uptown Home, 7800 Bustleton Ave., was brightened by the Sept. 28 visit by students from Politz Hebrew Academy. The youngsters socialized with the elderly residents and decorated the home's Sukkah, a structure that symbolizes the bounty of the harvest and the generosity of God. Sukkot was observed on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
About 300 people gathered Monday at the Kaiserman branch of the Jewish Community Center in Lower Merion to celebrate Sukkot, which rounds out the Jewish High Holidays. Sukkot, or the Feast of the Tabernacles, remembers the wandering of the Jews in the desert after they left Egypt and marks the fall harvest. Festivities included traditional dances and special harvest foods. Sponsors of this year's celebration included the Kaiserman branch, the Lubavitch House, Kadima Action Center and the JCC in Overbrook Park.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
Students and University of Pennsylvania community members snack al fresco at the Hillel Foundation's sukkah on the Penn campus. During Sukkot, or the Festival of Booths, which started Wednesday night and lasts for a week, Jews sometimes eat and sleep in temporary shelters erected in memory of the shelters of the Israelites as they fled Egypt. Many synagogues - and families - erect booths and decorate them with harvest bounty. Sukkot observances open to the public include: Sukkot for Soviet Jews who have recently arrived in the Philadelphia area, tomorrow, 1- 3 p.m., Klein Branch, Jewish Community Centers, Red Lion Road and Jamison Avenue.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
December 30, 2013 | By Roberta Matz, For The Inquirer
My husband and I recently traveled to the Baltic capitals and Russia with our cousins. I am a recently retired Jewish educator and a cousin is a retired rabbi. We were on a group trip that included tours in each city. I arranged Jewish tours in Vilnius, Riga, and Moscow - not necessarily to trace our roots, but to see what history is evident. It is almost impossible for me to trace my roots; my relatives came from shtetls - poor, mostly Jewish villages in the Pale of Settlement in Russia, in what today is Ukraine, Lithuania, and Latvia.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
In honor of the Jewish holiday Sukkot, groups of students at the University of Pennsylvania will construct and decorate small huts across campus this weekend. The first-time initiative, called "Sukkathon 2012," was inspired by the traditional holiday practice of building outdoor huts before the celebration of Sukkot. The huts, or "sukkahs," are built each holiday in homage to humble dwellings used by the Israelites during their 40-year trek through the desert following the exodus from Egypt.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2011
THE HARVEST season typically brings beer lovers classic German-style Oktoberfestbier, newfangled American pumpkin brews and ale made with freshly picked hops. In one small corner of the world, though, harvest time means etrog beer. Or, as David Cohen, owner of Tel Aviv's Dancing Camel Brewing Co. and inventor of this unusual style, says, "When you're done shaking 'em, we start baking 'em. " Maybe you need to know a little about Jewish tradition to understand the humor, so here goes: The etrog is a fragrant, yellow, thick-skinned citrus fruit grown mainly in Israel, Italy, Yemen and Morocco.
FOOD
September 27, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Having welcomed a New Year and a fresh start at Rosh Hashanah, repented on Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement) and been forgiven our sins, it is time to celebrate. Sukkot, the harvest festival that is among the oldest and most joyous of Jewish holidays, began at sunset last night and continues for seven days, followed by two separate days of prayer and celebration - Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah. During Sukkot, meals are eaten in a sukkah , a temporary outdoor structure open to the sky and the elements though shaded by greenery and adorned with fruits of the harvest, a reminder of huts used by the Israelites while wandering the desert in search of the Promised Land.
NEWS
September 23, 2005 | Rabbi Arthur Waskow
Rabbi Arthur Waskow directs The Shalom Center in Philadelphia At just the moment of history when religious violence, terrorism, and war have reemerged, bearing lethal dangers for our different communities and our shared planet, God has given our spiritual and religious traditions a gift of time: During October 2005 - and then again in the fall of 2006 and 2007 - a confluence of sacred moments in several different traditions invites...
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A two-day workshop titled "9/11 One Year Later: What Shall We Say to These Things?" begins Sunday at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 217 Fernbrook Ave., Wyncote. Each two-hour workshop will be complete in itself but also designed as segments of a continuous course. They will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Sunday and Sept. 29. Both workshops will be led by the Rev. Robert R. Lutz, a Lutheran pastor and pastoral counselor at the Samaritan Counseling Center in Blue Bell. The workshops will focus on the terrorist attacks of Sept.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jewish people around the world celebrate Sukkot this week, a holiday of giving thanks to God for the shelter they believe he provided to their people during their 40 years of wandering in the desert. In Marlton, however, the 200 families who belong to Congregation Beth Tikvah are asking God how he could let someone take their shelter away. A fire Saturday afternoon destroyed a building on the synagogue's property about 25 feet from the main sanctuary. "Sukkot is supposed to tell us how fragile life and shelter is," said Beth Tikvah Rabbi Gary M. Gans.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | For The Inquirer / LAURENCE KESTERSON
As part of Sukkot celebrations at Beth David Reform Congregation in Gladwyne, Abbye Caplan tied a decoration to the outdoor sukkah on the temple grounds yesterday. Sukkot, the Jewish harvest festival, is being celebrated this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1915, the Massachusetts branch of the Chepenik family received the following advice in a missive from its Jacksonville, Fla., relatives: "Sell everything. Come quickly to Florida, the land of milk and honey - you can walk down the streets and pick citrus. . . . " The combination of a balmy climate and untapped business opportunities lured many Jews - as well as others - to Florida earlier this century. They came decades before the mid-century migration that made south Florida a retirement mecca.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is not so long a trip from the biblical deserts to the 19th-floor rooftop of the Allen L. Rothenberg Tower. This was the rabbi's point as he sat in the sukkah high above Center City yesterday, the strong autumn sun knifing through the bamboo slats atop the temporary hut that many Jews build to celebrate the harvest festival called Sukkot. Below, Walnut Street bustled: a saxophone wailing, cars honking and screeching for position. Nineteen floors up, five men wearing suits and yarmulkes sat in the canvas tent and talked about the holiday blessings, the honor of inviting guests, and whether it is proper to make calls from a cellular phone inside the sukkah.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|