CollectionsSulfur
IN THE NEWS

Sulfur

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 9, 2007 | By Jeremy Rogoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Residents of parts of West Conshohocken and Upper Merion were advised to stay indoors yesterday after a dump truck carrying 40,000 pounds of sulfur waste overturned yesterday morning on a Blue Route off-ramp, spilling its load and causing a cloud of hazardous gas to form. Traffic was snarled for hours. A three-axle truck traveling from a Delaware County Sunoco refinery to Lansdale was exiting the northbound Blue Route onto the westbound Schuylkill Expressway at 7:52 a.m. when it tipped onto its left side.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc. said yesterday that it would spend millions of dollars on equipment at its Marcus Hook refinery to solve a pollution problem that has riled some neighbors and spurred Delaware regulators to fine the company $390,000 in May. The oil refiner said building a sulfur-recovery unit, which could cost more than $25 million, would allow it to safely process the acid gases that were now treated at the General Chemical Corp. plant next door in Claymont, Del. Part of the Sunoco refinery is in Claymont.
FOOD
October 22, 1986 | By Barbara Ensrud, New York Daily News
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms has issued regulations requiring that all alcoholic beverage labels indicate the presence of sulfur equal to or exceeding 10 parts per million. Almost all wines contain more than 10 ppm. The threshold at which a slight reaction appears in susceptible people is 100 ppm. The regulations, set Sept. 30, take effect Jan. 9 with a phase-in period of one year. All alcoholic beverages bottled or labeled after July 9, however, must state "contains sulfites" (or "sulfiting agents")
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
Philadelphia officials said yesterday that they were preparing to fine the Atlantic Refining & Marketing Corp. for releasing sulfur compounds into the air Wednesday night that prompted more than 400 phone calls to authorities from South Jersey residents. Arco could be fined more than $20,000, said Robert Vatistas, a staff engineer with the Philadelphia Health Department's Air Management Services. An Arco spokesman said the smell, which drew just one phone call to the department from a Philadelphia resident, was caused by two problems - maintenance on a sulfur recovery system and later the blowout of a safety flare on top of a smokestack, which burns pollutants such as sulfur.
NEWS
November 16, 1986
Listening to his message, it might have been easy to figure Edward B. Leisenring Jr. to be some out-of-place environmentalist as he addressed the Virginia Coal Council recently. He was telling his audience to get behind passage of an acid-rain control bill, legislation that the industry has vigorously opposed in past years. Edward Leisenring isn't some mouthpiece for environmentalists, however. He is the chairman of Westmoreland Coal Co., based in Philadelphia, and that's what makes his message to Eastern coal executives particularly interesting.
NEWS
October 17, 1986 | By Rosemary Banks, Special to The Inquirer
Texaco Inc. officials could face fines and imprisonment for failing to report three chemical spills that occurred at their Delaware City refinery in the last month, state officials said yesterday. Sharon Fitzgerald, a spokeswoman for the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, said the company is the subject of an investigation into spills of naphthalene, oil and sulfur. Acting on an anonymous telephone tip Oct. 6, natural-resources officials learned of a spill of naphthalene at the refinery just south of Wilmington, according to Fitzgerald.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1992 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the aging local power plant, the 1990 Clean Air Act looms as dark and foreboding a problem as the mountain-size piles of coal gracing its property. For Pittsburgh's Custom Coals International, though, the effort by the federal government to purify the nation's air looks like a shining business opportunity. Custom Coals has an executive or two but no rank and file, no production facilities to speak of yet and only half the capitalization it needs to really get going. What it does have is technology it says will turn coal squeaky-clean, freeing power companies from the need to install scrubbers, the costly equipment they now rely on to prevent sulfur from escaping into the atmosphere.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | By Nathan Gorenstein and Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writers
When students return to classes at the odor-plagued Marcus Hook Elementary School on Monday, they will witness a competition of sorts between two different environmental testing firms. The Chichester School District, forced to close the school for three days after students and teachers complained of watery eyes and irritated breathing passages, has hired two companies to test the school's ventilation system, air and a variety of materials in and around the building. They also will run tests on two other school buildings nearby.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1989 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sun Co. of Radnor yesterday announced that it would spend $126 million to improve the environmental quality of both its Atlantic refinery in South Philadelphia and the gasoline produced there. The company said that it would apply for necessary city and state permits and begin immediately with the site preparation work for the expansion of four processing plants. In addition, the company said it would spend $20 million to take advantage of other growth opportunities, including construction of Ultra car-repair service centers, service stations and convenience stores.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1991 | By Julia C. Martinez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. and Pennsylvania Power & Light have joined seven other utilities in a $375 million project to clean up one of the dirtiest coal-burning plants in the United States. The Conemaugh Electric Generating Station project is expected to generate more than 300 construction jobs in the Johnstown, Pa., area and will involve the installation of a giant scrubber at each of the station's two coal-fired power plants. The scrubbers will reduce emissions of sulfur-dioxide and nitrogen-oxide pollutants by 95 percent, a PE spokesman said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
By July 2015, all home heating oil sold in Philadelphia would have to meet new sulfur limits unanimously passed Thursday by City Council. The limits would "make a tangible difference in the health of our citizens" by improving air quality, said Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, who sponsored the measure. It now goes to Mayor Nutter, who is expected to sign it. The bill was intended to put the city in alignment with sulfur standards in surrounding states - so the city would not become a dumping ground for dirtier fuel - but the timetable actually moves the city to the forefront.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A measure to reduce sulfur in home heating oil - saving lives and health-care dollars, as well as easing air pollution, its advocates say - passed unanimously out of Philadelphia City Council's environment committee Wednesday and heads to the full Council today. The bill, proposed by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, would lower the sulfur limit from 2,000 parts per million - a level passed in 1978 - to 15 parts per million, putting the city in line with neighboring states. Only Pennsylvania has a higher limit - 500 parts per million.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia councilwoman wants to restrict the amount of sulfur allowable in home heating oil sold or used in the city - a change that, she says, would save lives and health-care dollars, and reduce the haze that fogs the summer skyline. "We need to bring our fuel standard into the 21st century," said Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, who proposed the tighter limits last week. The measure, supported by public-health and environmental advocates, will be discussed at an environmental committee hearing Wednesday.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans a hearing Wednesday in Philadelphia on an Obama administration proposal to clean up gasoline and automobile emissions, one of only two public sessions nationwide on the so-called Tier 3 standards. The rules, which mandate cleaner fuels and some new vehicle technologies, are aimed at reducing soot, sulfur, and nitrogen oxide emissions. "We're looking at automobiles and fuels as a system," said Christopher Grundler, director of the EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2013 | By Dina Cappiello, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration's newest antipollution plan would ping drivers where they wince the most: at the gas pump. That makes arguments weighing the cost against the health benefits politically potent. The proposal to reduce sulfur in gasoline and tighten auto emission standards, released Friday, would raise gasoline prices by less than a penny per gallon, the Environmental Protection Agency says. But the oil industry cited its own study, which puts the cost at 6 to 9 cents a gallon.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Dina Cappiello, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration will unveil a proposal Friday to clean up gasoline and automobile emissions, a step that officials say will result in cleaner air across the nation and slightly higher prices at the pump. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the rule to reduce sulfur in gasoline and tighten emissions standards on cars beginning in 2017 could increase gas prices by less than a penny per gallon and add $130 to the cost of a vehicle in 2025. But the agency says it will yield billions of dollars in health benefits by slashing smog- and soot-forming pollution come 2030.
NEWS
June 4, 2010 | By Renee Schoof, McClatchy Newspapers
  WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday set a new health standard that coal-fired power plants and other industries will have to meet on sulfur dioxide, a pollutant that triggers asthma attacks and other respiratory problems. The EPA set the standard within a range that an independent panel of scientists suggested. This marks the first time the standard has been changed since the original one, issued in 1971. The new rule sets the amount at 75 parts per billion over a one-hour period, a level that is aimed at protecting people who go outdoors from short-term exposures.
NEWS
June 9, 2007 | By Jeremy Rogoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Residents of parts of West Conshohocken and Upper Merion were advised to stay indoors yesterday after a dump truck carrying 40,000 pounds of sulfur waste overturned yesterday morning on a Blue Route off-ramp, spilling its load and causing a cloud of hazardous gas to form. Traffic was snarled for hours. A three-axle truck traveling from a Delaware County Sunoco refinery to Lansdale was exiting the northbound Blue Route onto the westbound Schuylkill Expressway at 7:52 a.m. when it tipped onto its left side.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This year's third big change to the formulation of the nation's fuel supply kicks in today. The first two changes affected gasoline - reducing sulfur content in January and adopting ethanol as an additive in April. Now it's diesel's turn. Oil refiners now must take virtually all the sulfur out of most highway diesel fuel to help meet the Environmental Protection Agency's clean-air regulations. The EPA projects that the new diesel fuel with 15 parts per million of sulfur, down from 500 parts per million, will dramatically cut emissions of nitrogen oxides and other pollutants.
NEWS
July 25, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid the usual samples of fish, bugs and river sediment, this month there is an unlikely assortment of wood and metal scraps in David Velinsky's environmental research lab at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Contained in six plastic bags, the scraps came from the wreck of the USS Monitor, the ironclad Civil War battleship that revolutionized naval combat. The vessel deteriorated sharply in the century after it sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in 1862, and ever since the wreck was discovered in 1973, conservationists have labored to slow the aging process.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|