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Sulfuric Acid

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NEWS
July 25, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid the usual samples of fish, bugs and river sediment, this month there is an unlikely assortment of wood and metal scraps in David Velinsky's environmental research lab at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Contained in six plastic bags, the scraps came from the wreck of the USS Monitor, the ironclad Civil War battleship that revolutionized naval combat. The vessel deteriorated sharply in the century after it sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in 1862, and ever since the wreck was discovered in 1973, conservationists have labored to slow the aging process.
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
It was yet another nightmare on I-95. Traffic on the busy highway was stopped in predawn hours today after a tank truck carrying 3,000 gallons of toxic sulfuric acid flipped over and rolled into a ditch. Both northbound and southbound lanes of the interstate between the Academy Road interchange in Northeast Philadelphia and the Street Road interchange in Bensalem Township, Bucks County, were closed after the 4:47 a.m. accident, just before the start of morning rush hour. None of the acid appeared to have leaked from the tractor-trailer tanker, authorities at the scene said.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | Alejandro A. Alvarez / Daily News
Several cars of a CSX train carrying sulfuric acid derailed early yesterday, dumping its contents into the Schuylkill River and onto Kelly Drive in the city. The 12 cars on the 39-car train traveling from Canada to Baltimore derailed about 1:30 a.m. Two of the cars leaked about 12,000 gallons of the acid onto the roadway used by many commuters traveling into the city, and the adjacent river. Sulfuric acid is a corrosive chemical used in car batteries. The road was closed for several hours.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The evacuation of more than 200 people and at least 50 businesses, the mobilization of scores of police officers and fire officials, the closing of numerous streets, and the detours of hundreds of drivers - all because of a cigarette butt? Environmental Protection Agency officials found evidence yesterday that a discarded cigarette butt - or possibly a firecracker tossed through a vent on top of an abandoned storage tank in a Bensalem industrial park - sparked a chemical reaction that resulted in hazardous sulfuric acid vapors escaping into the air last month.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer The Associated Press contributed to this article
A large tank containing recycled sulfuric acid exploded yesterday afternoon in Salem County, rocking Du Pont Co.'s Chambers Works plant in Deepwater, officials said. The tank exploded at 1:36 p.m. at the center of Du Pont's largest chemical plant, said Kelli Kukura, a company spokeswoman. The 30,000-gallon-capacity tank contained about 22,000 gallons of recycled sulfuric acid. The explosion created a thick cloud of smoke, officials said. The ensuing fire was brought under control in half an hour and extinguished by about 3 p.m., officials said.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 200 people evacuated from an area around a Bensalem industrial park since Wednesday because of sulfuric acid fumes escaping from a storage tank were permitted to return yesterday after the area was declared safe, officials said. The half-mile stretch of State Road, between Street Road and Station Avenue, was reopened at 1 a.m. after the federal Environmental Protection Agency installed a scrubber to neutralize vapors and subsequent tests showed normal air quality, said Bensalem public safety director Frank Friel.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Dave Bittan contributed to this report
Howard Smith's white lab coat made him a standout among the heavily outfitted firefighters and hazardous-materials workers who strode yesterday outside a gutted chemical factory in Kensington. As television crews trailed after a moon-suited crew from the Environmental Protection Agency, Smith carefully placed another glass laboratory tube back into his canvas sack. Despite the contrast in styles, the lightly clothed chemist and the workers lugging air packs were working on the same problems outside the still-smoking Purolite Co. plant.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | By Russell Gold and Richard V. Sabatini, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer correspondent Christine Bahls contributed to this article
A white, wispy vapor of sulfuric acid continued to escape from a rusted chemical storage tank yesterday in an industrial park in Bensalem, forcing an evacuation to continue for the second day. Officials said yesterday that they expected the leak to be contained overnight and business to resume today. Roads to the immediate area remained closed through last night, and 15 people yesterday were asked to leave summer bungalows in the Columbus Country Club on State Road, local fire officials said.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A fire at a metal-processing plant yesterday spewed a huge, chemical-filled cloud that led to the evacuation of about 14,000 people and the declaration of a disaster emergency by Gov. Casey. Officials, fearful that the black plume from the Spencer Metal Processing Co. contained sulfuric acid, evacuated two Luzerne County communities and called on the Pennsylvania National Guard to assist at the scene. There were no serious injuries, and the smoke cloud largely dispersed by late morning, revealing clear blue skies.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
Four workers at a laboratory in Gloucester County were burned, one of them seriously, and an additional 20 people were evacuated from the building when a shelf containing several bottles of sulfuric acid collapsed yesterday. Two firefighters who aided in their rescue also were burned, police said. The four were working at Century Laboratories Inc., an environmental testing lab on Grandview Avenue in the Thorofare section of West Deptford Township, when the accident occurred shortly before 9 a.m., police said.
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NEWS
March 6, 2013
3 held in attack on ballet official MOSCOW - Russian police said Tuesday they arrested three men, including a star dancer, in the acid attack that nearly blinded the artistic director of the Bolshoi Ballet. Sergei Filin, 42, sustained severe burns to his eyes and face when a masked attacker threw sulfuric acid in his face Jan. 17. The former dancer is undergoing treatment in Germany. Interior Ministry spokesman Anatoly Lastovetsky said Bolshoi soloist Pavel Dmitrichenko was suspected of planning the attack.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Motiva Enterprises L.L.C. has agreed to pay nearly $16.2 million to settle a civil lawsuit filed by state and federal regulators following a deadly explosion at a Delaware oil refinery four years ago. The consent decree, announced yesterday, brings the total disclosed payments arising from the accident that killed a Bucks County boilermaker to more than $70 million. Motiva, which sold the Delaware City refinery in May 2004 to Premcor Inc., will pay a $12 million civil penalty, $4 million for environmental projects, and $170,000 to reimburse state and federal governments for response costs.
NEWS
July 25, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid the usual samples of fish, bugs and river sediment, this month there is an unlikely assortment of wood and metal scraps in David Velinsky's environmental research lab at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Contained in six plastic bags, the scraps came from the wreck of the USS Monitor, the ironclad Civil War battleship that revolutionized naval combat. The vessel deteriorated sharply in the century after it sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in 1862, and ever since the wreck was discovered in 1973, conservationists have labored to slow the aging process.
NEWS
August 28, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal safety inspectors blame the owner of a Delaware City, Del., refinery for a July 2001 tank explosion that killed a Bucks County man and injured eight others. Motiva Enterprises failed to fix holes in the tank of sulfuric acid and ignored its own employees' warnings that the tank needed a thorough inspection, the government investigators said in a report to be issued today. The explosion might have been prevented had Motiva heeded the warnings, including one just three weeks before the blast, according to the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
NEWS
July 16, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Delaware officials filed federal lawsuits yesterday against refinery owner Motiva Enterprises L.L.C., accusing the company of gross negligence for its role in an explosion last year that killed a Bucks County man, injured eight people, and spilled 1.1 million gallons of sulfuric acid and petroleum products. Officials declined to specify the amount of damages they were seeking, saying that determination was ultimately up to the courts, but the statutory formulas cited in the lawsuit provide for maximum penalties of more than $70 million.
NEWS
January 27, 2002 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A massive explosion at a Burlington County scrap-metal reprocessing plant could have been caused by the improper mixing of chemicals, investigators said. One person was killed and at least five were injured in the explosion Friday morning at Hi-Temp Specialty Metals Inc. The powerful blast ripped off part of the roof and toppled a wall at the plant on Beverly Road. Pinpointing the cause could take several months. "Anything is a possibility," said Paula Dixon-Roderick, an assistant director with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a house still filled with flowers from her father's funeral, Mary Davis waits for her husband to come home. Jeffrey Davis, a 50-year-old boilermaker and father of five, hasn't been seen since a fire erupted nine days ago at the Delaware City, Del., refinery where he was working for a subcontractor. He is presumed dead, but acid leaking throughout the fire site has prevented a thorough search for his body. Now, new bouquets are filling rooms in the Yorkshire Road home where Davis lived since the age of 2 - and where, for more than a week, his family has held a sorrowful vigil.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | Alejandro A. Alvarez / Daily News
Several cars of a CSX train carrying sulfuric acid derailed early yesterday, dumping its contents into the Schuylkill River and onto Kelly Drive in the city. The 12 cars on the 39-car train traveling from Canada to Baltimore derailed about 1:30 a.m. Two of the cars leaked about 12,000 gallons of the acid onto the roadway used by many commuters traveling into the city, and the adjacent river. Sulfuric acid is a corrosive chemical used in car batteries. The road was closed for several hours.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chemicals, coal and automobiles: These are just a few of the major commodities found on rail cars in the region. Motorists are familiar with big rigs on the highways, but rail freight passes mostly unnoticed. That is, until an incident like the CSX derailment of 13 cars and the resulting spill of thousands of gallons of sulfuric acid that closed Kelly Drive yesterday. "Folks don't know that much about everything that moves on a freight railroad," said H. Craig Lewis, Norfolk Southern vice president for corporate affairs.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A CSX train bound from Quebec to Baltimore derailed early yesterday in Fairmount Park, spilling thousands of gallons of sulfuric acid and forcing the closure of Kelly Drive north of Boathouse Row. City officials said the busy road, a popular alternative to the Schuylkill Expressway, could be closed until late this afternoon. There were no reports of serious injuries, but a police sergeant drove himself to Hahnemann University Hospital complaining about exposure to fumes, fire officials said.
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