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FOOD
May 5, 2011
If you are part of a new program offering locally grown fruits and vegetables or locally raised meat, poultry and dairy products this summer, we'd like to hear from you. Send a note about your program, along with your contact information, to dmarder@phillynews.com .   - Dianna Marder  
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JIM PRESTON
School's out, and for students from John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School, 19th and Wood Streets, that calls for whooping it up in Logan Square's Swann Fountain. The girls took their dip after school let out for the summer yesterday.
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS AND ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
The first weekend of the summer of '90 was as good as it gets: a bright, sunny sky, a gentle breeze and (surprise) no rain. So, what do you do on a weekend like this? For hundreds at Belmont Plateau in Fairmount Park, yesterday was perfect for rocking to the reggae beat provided by several bands who performed in the city's annual Reggae Tribute Day. Or, like the pair below, you could just row, row, row your raft.
NEWS
March 12, 2006 | By Mark Franek FOR THE INQUIRER
For many years a map was tacked to the back wall of my classroom. Its colors had faded and its edges had lifted. Except for some indecipherable graffiti in the Indian Ocean, it had been forgotten - until a visiting Icelandic student challenged: "There's something wrong with this map!" Sure enough, just to the southeast of Greenland - where Iceland should be - there was nothing but water. So much for maps. Arni (pronounced "ought-knee") grew up in Saudarkrokur, Iceland (pop.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
A lawn is actually made of millions of individual grass plants, which, left unmowed, will grow a few feet tall. Most grasses are perennial, meaning they come back year after year. Uncut, the grass will bloom in late summer and spread seeds in the fall.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PETER TOBIA
Millie Trivett found relief from July's heat wave by sleeping in front of a fan in the living room of her Baltimore Avenue home. The summer of '95 was the hottest on record in Philadelphia, claiming 88 lives in the city and its suburbs in a 25-day period. A break in the heat finally came on Aug. 5.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
Along the Boardwalk in Atlantic City, people take advantage of the traditional treats of summer, enthusiastically eating ice cream and ices and downing cold drinks. Although the temperature at the resort peaked at 85 yesterday, a southerly wind kept conditions pleasant.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
Payton Faries, 5, cools her feet in the water at Penn's Landing during the 13th annual Jam on the River. Tonight, blues singers Koko Taylor and Ruth Brown will be featured, along with the music of Buckwheat Zydeco to welcome summer to the city.
NEWS
May 23, 2008
Summer is the season you remember. Who remembers winter, really? Unless there was a blizzard, and you got into a fight over the legality of whether two wobbly kitchen chairs and a broom constitute a reserved parking space, in which case you'd rather forget winter anyway. Spring is fine, especially when you catch an unexpected whiff of lilac on a soft breeze. And autumn is spectacular, until those golden maple leaves lose their brilliance and clog your gutters. But summer is the season that creates warm memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1986 | By Kim Masters, Los Angeles Daily News
"Top Gun' outgunned the competition at the box office this summer in a season that ended with a total of $1.4 billion in ticket sales, down 1 percent from last summer's less-than-stellar level. This summer was the first in this decade without a George Lucas or Steven Spielberg extravaganza and it had no smashes in the $150 million range. "Top Gun" grossed $119 million in the season, which runs from May 23 through Sept. 1. (Before May 23, "Top Gun" grossed an additional $12.2 million.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
The Camden School District is offering a daylong, five-week summer school this year for as many as 1,000 students from ages 3 to 19, officials said Tuesday. The free program, from July 6 through Aug. 5, will focus on reading and math but also include field trips, sports, and other curriculums. The voluntary program will include breakfast and lunch, and run from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Students can take school buses to get there, officials said. Summer school programs offered by the district in previous years ran only to midday, and provided no transportation.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
This story of entrepreneurial intrepidity can, in part, be traced to a hemorrhoid-treatment procedure. Melissa Lee witnessed one as a high school student who had convinced a family physician to let her tag along to see what being a doctor would be like. She promptly decided it was not for her. Neither, she decided, was "cubicle life," after she spent the end of her senior year interning in the finance department at Bank of New York/Mellon, where her father works. Her calling to start a business instead came while Lee was a sophomore at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, where she helped form the Rutgers Entrepreneurial Society.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A PERFECT storm is brewing at U.S. airports ahead of the busy summer travel season: longer lines to get through security screening. Airlines and airports are warning fliers to get to the airport two hours early for domestic flights and three hours for international trips. Traffic is up, TSA staffing is down, and the security workers who remain are charged with carrying out more stringent measures after recent terror attacks. Passengers on American Airlines in Philadelphia and in four other cities got a taste of the longer waits over spring break, March 14 to March 20, when lines through screening checkpoints were an hour or longer.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
This correction appears in Saturday's Inquirer and Daily News: A story in Friday's Inquirer erred in reporting that Philadelphia School District officials expect twice as many high school students to fail courses this year and be required to attend summer school. The district has expanded its summer program to accommodate juniors as well as seniors this year, a move that will double the available slots. However, officials say they do not yet know whether enrollment will grow because final student grades are not in.  The original story follows below.
NEWS
April 11, 2016
The national average price of a gallon of regular gas in the first quarter was $1.86, according to the American Automobile Association. That's only 16 cents more than a gallon of Perrier water if you buy it at Walmart as a six-pack of 16.9-ounce bottles. Even if gasoline goes up 15 to 25 cents a gallon by Memorial Day, as AAA suspects it will, the price is still a powerful incentive to drive to where the fun is. Which raises a question: Is the family transit up to the rigors of the road?
BUSINESS
April 8, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a successful drive in 2014 to fund the start of her Wild Mantle line of winter hooded scarves, Main Line entrepreneur Avi Loren Fox is launching another Kickstarter campaign Thursday to support a new line of hooded covers for warm weather. Fox, 29, a Narberth native who is Wild Mantle's CEO and designer, is looking to raise $44,000 to release a summer collection. She raised $39,827 in 2014 from 300 backers. The current campaign will kick off at 4:44 p.m. Thursday. "44 is my lucky number," Fox explained in an email.
NEWS
March 29, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - To say that Mark Soifer would go to the ends of the earth for Ocean City may be an understatement. Because in the 45 years that Soifer - who will retire at the end of the summer from his position as the resort's public relations director - has commuted from his home in Vineland to his office here, he could have circumnavigated the globe three times. Soifer, aside from creating and executing dozens of local events and activities over the years, has also written about 5,000 columns for the local newspaper, the Ocean City Sentinel, and thousands of news releases about everything from the annual Doo Dah Parade to the Mister Maturity Pageant.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
NORTH WILDWOOD - For some politicos, it may be all about poll numbers right now. But up and down the New Jersey coastline, where the local economy depends on the popularity of a beach town with summer visitors, officials say the only numbers that matter this time of the year involve cubic yards - as in the amount of sand on their beachfronts. Tourism in New Jersey is a $42-billion-a-year enterprise that employs more than 300,000 people and accounts for more than 6 percent of all jobs, according to the Department of Labor.
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