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Summer Camp

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NEWS
June 10, 1990 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Exploring outer space, creating a circus and learning about things that fly are just some of the activities planned by the Tredyffrin Township summer camp program. The program, which has been operating for more than a decade, has two programs, one for preschool children ages 3 to 5 and one for elementary school children ages 6 to 11. Sherri Ruppe, coordinator for the camp, said the preschool program would be behind the Strafford Library. "The preschool camp is stressing group activities, arts and crafts and music," she said.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
At first glance, Camp Carrousel looks like a typical summer camp with children singing, playing games and doing arts and crafts. But a closer look reveals games with unusual sounding words - dans le jardin, laitue and a singing Napoleon avec cinq cent soldats. Soldats (soldiers)? Laitue (lettuce)? Dans le jardin (in the garden)? Camp Carrousel has an international flair for its campers - because everything is in French. "Bonjour, bonjour," shouts Josette Pestalozzi, one of the teachers, as she greets the children with a hearty handshake upon their arrival at the camp at Shipley School in Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | Wires / Washington Post
My daughter is only 8, but she has already felt the cruel sting of rejection. "At this time, we have acceptances out for all spaces available in both sessions of Creative Campers," said the letter from the Holton-Arms School's summer camp. The day camp offered to put my daughter on the waiting list. It was Jan. 27. This called for handling the matter in a uniquely Washington way: paying to play. The Smithsonian's camps, it turned out, would give a registration head start to those donating "to the Smithsonian Associates at the Contributor level ($300 or higher)
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | By CHAIM POTOK
It arrives, finally - summertime! An enchanted realm stretches before us: a landscape washed in golden sunlight; a languor of long lazy afternoons; flocks of birds and clouds of butterflies; nights cool and fragrant; mornings miraculous with dew. And a sudden dazzling explosion of color: blossoming trees, green-shadowed woods, flowering meadows and a vast overpowering cerulean sky. Summertime. And summer camp. During the first two decades of my life, the '30s and '40s, poliomyelitis was a frightful scourge made all the more horrifying in that most of the afflicted were children.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
They won't be wearing swimsuits or shorts, but summer fun will be on their minds when representatives from 40 summer camps meet at the Tredyffrin/ Easttown Intermediate School on Tuesday for the third annual summer camp fair. Sponsored by the Devon Elementary Parent Teacher Organization, the fair will be from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in the cafeteria at the intermediate school in Berwyn. "A lot of parents ask each other what their children are doing in the summer," said Judy Tilles, chairwoman of the event.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | By Macarena Hernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This summer 300 Philadelphia children will travel to Africa - without ever leaving their neighborhoods. For the first time, computers are being added to the curriculum of the Summer Urban Neighborhood day camp so that children can use high technology to study Africa and African American history makers. At a news conference in the offices of the NAACP in North Philadelphia yesterday, a coalition of local businesses and organizations announced plans to expand the curriculum and triple the number of participants, from 100 to 300. The S.U.N.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Jeff McGaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For generations of summer campers, the greatest act of love that a mother could perform was sending brownies from home. But times have changed. For those mothers with precious little time for homemade gifts, or for who perhaps have time but don't know what to send, there is Giftpak Industries in Jenkintown. For anywhere from $5 to $22, Giftpak Industries will assemble and send a care package to youths in summer exile. Contents of the package vary, depending on the age and sex of the youth.
NEWS
April 16, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
To be gay and Christian at the same time can feel like conflicting identities, but a weeklong summer camp in Minnesota gives teens license to be both. "For some of these kids it's perhaps the first time in their lives they can be truly authentic," said the Rev. Brad Froslee, co-director of the Naming Project Summer Camp, a place where young people of all sexual orientations and gender identities can share their faith. The camp on Bay Lake near Deerwood, Minn., had been operating quietly since 2004 until it was featured in early March on Lisa Ling's new Oprah Winfrey Network show, "Our America.
NEWS
July 26, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
While their students were off at summer camps, relaxing poolside, or at the Jersey Shore, 21 teachers gathered at Valley Forge National Historical Park last week to take part in a summer camp of their own, one that would strengthen their abilities to teach history in today's classroom. The Valley Forge Teacher's Institute brought historical authors Thomas Fleming and Gary Nash in to speak with the teachers this year, headlining a group of local college professors. In addition to time spent at lectures, the teachers were given guided tours of the park, and spent a day hitting the historical hotspots of Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
DURING THE school year, Manuel Walker and his 8-year-old son start their day at 4:40 a.m. when they leave the shelter where they live in West Philly for school in Mount Airy. Two trains, a bus, and an hour and a half later, Walker leaves his son at the before-school child care and continues to travel for another hour to work. For homeless parents like Walker, relief in the summer months comes not from a reprieve from the school commute, but from knowing their kids still have somewhere to go. Walker will gratefully shuttle his son to and from camp this summer - thanks to funding from Child Care Information Services of Philadelphia with the help of their shelter, Families Forward Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 11, 2016
TOM PRADER was one angry kid. Diagnosed with leukemia at 11, he soon got fed up with sickness, with hospitals, even the people in them. Go to a summer camp for kids with cancer? No way. "I had no interest in doing anything to do with cancer, or being away with people with cancer," he said. Eventually, reluctantly, he agreed to go. "I still resisted at first until the unexplainable magic of camp just happened," Prader said. "People are like you. People understand what you are going through.
NEWS
August 29, 2016
As many Philadelphians schedule their Labor Day weekend trips down the Shore, consider the story of the John Wanamaker Commercial Institute, a school and New Jersey-based summer camp for its namesake's employees. The postmaster general and retail magnate started the "store school" in 1897 for young workers in his department stores. Ranging in age from 12 to the early 20s, student-employees were provided with "daily opportunities to obtain a working education in the arts and sciences of commerce and trade," Wanamaker wrote in 1909.
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
In 2009, Emily O'Donnell made a bold prediction when her parents dropped her off at the Jersey Shore for a counseling job at a summer camp for blind and visually impaired children. "Some day, I'm going to run this place," O'Donnell, then 19 and a bright-eyed Kutztown University sophomore elementary education major, told her mother. O'Donnell not only fell in love with the Helen L. Diller Vacation Home for the Blind, she worked her way up at the camp in Avalon, which provides free summer vacations for blind and visually impaired children from across the region.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Were you skeptical that crowdfunding would help small companies go public? So were we, but it's actually happening. Forthcoming IPOs include craft beer companies, a bionic pancreas, and a camp for girls. Roughly 75 small companies, some start-ups and some longtime small businesses, have filed with federal regulators to go public using crowdfunding "portals. " These stock and bond offerings are put out via the new financing portals, which are all electronic. The portals became legal as of May, but regulators stress that investing in start-ups is risky.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, STAFF WRITER
Arie Gluck, 86, of Voorhees, a member of Israel's first Olympic track team and a legendary director of a summer camp in the Poconos, died Thursday, June 23, at Virtua Voorhees Hospital. Mr. Gluck was the director at Camp Harlam for 37 years, starting in the summer of 1966. Current director Aaron Selkow described him as "one of the great legends in this field. " While he ran an organization built around fun and play, Mr. Gluck's former colleagues remembered him as a leader commanding great respect.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
DURING THE school year, Manuel Walker and his 8-year-old son start their day at 4:40 a.m. when they leave the shelter where they live in West Philly for school in Mount Airy. Two trains, a bus, and an hour and a half later, Walker leaves his son at the before-school child care and continues to travel for another hour to work. For homeless parents like Walker, relief in the summer months comes not from a reprieve from the school commute, but from knowing their kids still have somewhere to go. Walker will gratefully shuttle his son to and from camp this summer - thanks to funding from Child Care Information Services of Philadelphia with the help of their shelter, Families Forward Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Summertime. A lake, quiet woodlands, mini-golf. Ah, sleepaway camp in the Poconos. Philadelphia natives Joanne Thomas, 65; her twin sister, Diane Colf; and their mother, Anne Thomas, 91, had long wanted to travel together. When Colf retired from her corrections job, they chose Camp Ladore in Waymart, Pa., operated by the Salvation Army. "And there's no sleeping in tents," Joanne Thomas said with a laugh. The senior- friendly summer camp has comfortable quarters, and a swimming pool.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
BENJAMIN Camp and Jacob Winterstein started hatching impish schemes as teens at a Quaker summer camp in New Jersey. They would unscrew enough lightbulbs to throw the entire camp into chaos for at least 20 pitch-black minutes. They would use mealtimes to try out the wackiest ways to eat, sitting cross-legged beneath the tables. For Camp, a suburban kid from King of Prussia, and Winterstein, a city kid from Mount Airy, Camp Dark Waters in Medford cultivated a mischievous creativity.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
1 A tree grows near State Road and Linden To kick off this year's Love Your Park Week, Mayor Kenney will help plant trees near the fishing pier in Pleasant Hill Park in Torresdale today. More than 100 volunteers are expected to help clean and mulch at the park, starting at 8:30 a.m. The mayor and other dignitaries speak at 11:30 a.m. 2 Juniata Park Parade returns After a 15-year absence, the Juniata Park Parade is back, beginning at 1 p.m. today. This year's parade features the Samuel Fels High School Band and the Polish American String Band.
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