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Summer Rentals

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BUSINESS
April 1, 1991 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
No doubt about it, Jerry Williams had the vacation from hell. His first experience at the Jersey shore could also be dubbed: what not to do when choosing a summer rental. Williams and three other teenagers from Churchville, Bucks County, paid $4,000 to rent a two-bedroom house in North Wildwood last summer. The house was being renovated when they first saw it in January. But the real estate agent promised work would be completed by May. They paid cash in advance. When the boys arrived around Memorial Day, "the place was a total mess," Williams said.
NEWS
February 21, 1995 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Since the Wengo sisters were girls, they have spent two weeks every summer together at the Jersey Shore - always renting a house in the same beach block for the same time in July. But for the first time in more than 60 years, the family's tradition of spending vacations cavorting together on the 48th Street beach will change. A rush on summer rentals - which some real-estate agents say started on New Year's Day and hasn't let up - left the Wengos and others scrambling this Presidents Day weekend to find properties to rent for their vacations.
REAL_ESTATE
April 10, 1994 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Look out the window. The snow has melted. The birds are singing. The crocuses are popping their pretty little heads from beneath last fall's unraked leaves. Open the window and listen, above the noise of the street, past the kids whining your name from the soggy back yard. Can you hear it? It's the sound of waves crashing on a sandy beach. It's summertime at the Jersey Shore. From Long Beach Island to Cape May, real estate agents are reporting a brisk business in rentals - from 18 percent above last year in Avalon to 64 percent above in the Wildwoods.
NEWS
April 6, 2004
WHERE IS the recession the Democrats are so loudly complaining about? Some pertinent facts: 1. It is next to impossible to get a room in Atlantic City for any weekend. 2. Ninety percent of the summer rentals at the shore have been taken. 3. Tickets to concerts, theaters and sporting events are at a premium. At restaurants, the lines are out the door. 4. The steel mills are booming, the casinos are packed, homes and cars are selling like there's no tomorrow. 5. A Bucks County friend sold 60 building lots ($200-400,000)
REAL_ESTATE
September 29, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Retirees and émigrés from northern New Jersey, Simeon and Mary Carvajal fell in love with Cape May, the Villas, and other towns farther south along the Jersey coast. They started out as Shore property owners in 2011, buying one house, a cottage, as a vacation retreat for themselves. Now they're looking to buy their fourth seashore property. After the first house, the Carvajals bought an additional vacation home just down the street, in the 100 block of Roslyn Avenue in North Cape May. Then, as a retirement present last summer, Simeon bought Mary a third house in the same neighborhood, on the 300 block of Roslyn, as an investment property for $295,000.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Atlantic City has its casinos. Ocean City has a kiddie magnet called a boardwalk. Cape May's Victoriana draws them in droves. Even Margate has an elephant named Lucy. But Ventnor? Sure, it shares the same 120-mile coastline with all those other Jersey Shore towns, from Sea Bright to Cape May Point, that have reputations for things other than being good places to park a beach blanket. But Ventnor appears to lack a certain name recognition. So local officials have hired consultants and mounted a campaign to give Ventnor an image of its own. The name "Ventnor" conjures up virtually no image now, according to Julie Mealo of the Ventnor Planning Board, who is spearheading the campaign.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the old days, the trek to find that perfect Jersey Shore rental didn't start until Presidents Day weekend in February. Then, last New Year's Day - six weeks early - customers began clogging real estate offices, requesting tours and checking prices, and by mid-January, rental agents were reporting that 30 percent of their available properties were taken. This year, rental agents from Long Beach Island to Cape May say the search for summer rentals is already underway - more than 25 percent of their housing stock for next summer, mostly the high-end places on the beachfront or a beach block, is gone.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
SUMMER SEEMED so far away last month at the Jersey Shore, with ice inching across back bays and winds whipping sand across empty beaches. In the Shore towns hit hardest by Superstorm Sandy, mostly in Central Jersey, the sounds of bulldozers and circular saws echoed in the frozen landscape. But in resorts spared from Sandy's worst, particularly in Cape May County, real-estate agents say their phones are burning up with calls from people like Norman Noe looking for undamaged summer rentals.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Bob and Jean Bryant, it became a quest more important than finding the perfect Christmas tree or searching for that one elusive toy their granddaughter wanted to find under it. The Radnor, Pa., couple joined hundreds of others last month who delayed holiday dinners with friends, put off wrapping presents, and left shopping undone - all so they could find the perfect summer retreat in this town of 3,272 possible choices. And real estate professionals throughout other parts of Cape May County, as well as Atlantic and Ocean Counties, reported an unusually high number of people in December looking for summer rentals at the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
It's almost time to come down to the shore to look into renting a place for your vacation . . . for next summer. Not that it's too late to find a place to stay this summer, but, according to the experts, last-minute renters don't have it easy. The traditional months for signing leases for shore rentals are January and February. And in the last few years, says Paul Leiser of Avalon Real Estate Agency in Avalon, the best digs have rented even earlier. That trend was launched by the ice storms in January and February of 1994, Leiser explained.
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REAL_ESTATE
September 29, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Retirees and émigrés from northern New Jersey, Simeon and Mary Carvajal fell in love with Cape May, the Villas, and other towns farther south along the Jersey coast. They started out as Shore property owners in 2011, buying one house, a cottage, as a vacation retreat for themselves. Now they're looking to buy their fourth seashore property. After the first house, the Carvajals bought an additional vacation home just down the street, in the 100 block of Roslyn Avenue in North Cape May. Then, as a retirement present last summer, Simeon bought Mary a third house in the same neighborhood, on the 300 block of Roslyn, as an investment property for $295,000.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONGPORT, N.J. - Bob Lawrence has no choice but to put behind him the memory of Hurricane Sandy ripping apart the deck and outdoor shower of his summer rental home. "In this game you have to keep moving forward. . . . You can't look back. You have to come back stronger and better from something like that," said Lawrence, 57, who replaced much of the old wooden structure with fiberglass components to help attract renters to the three-bedroom bay-front Longport home that he privately rents for as much as $6,000 a week.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
SUMMER SEEMED so far away last month at the Jersey Shore, with ice inching across back bays and winds whipping sand across empty beaches. In the Shore towns hit hardest by Superstorm Sandy, mostly in Central Jersey, the sounds of bulldozers and circular saws echoed in the frozen landscape. But in resorts spared from Sandy's worst, particularly in Cape May County, real-estate agents say their phones are burning up with calls from people like Norman Noe looking for undamaged summer rentals.
NEWS
February 25, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite the snow - or maybe because of it - the number of Jersey Shore vacationers who have locked in their summer rentals may actually be up, say coastal real estate agents. Lousy weather "inspires more people to think about the summer and get going on finding a rental property for their vacation," theorized Deedra Bowen of Ocean City's Berger Realty, which has the keys to roughly 2,500 units. The resort has 15,000 rental units, more than any other Shore town. Weekly rates run from $1,500 several blocks from the water to $15,000 for multistory beachfront luxury, Jacuzzi included.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forecasts of economic gloom don't faze Megan Eberz and her partners, owners of three restaurants at the Jersey Shore. The outlook for the Shore this summer is a bit sunnier than for other places, insisted Eberz, now busy making decisions about staffing and menus for the season. Colleagues in the real estate business - the front line of the tourism industry - report that summer rentals and lodging reservations are ahead of 2008 by as much as 10 percent in some locations, she said.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forecasts of economic gloom don't faze Megan Eberz and her partners, owners of three restaurants at the Jersey Shore. The outlook for the Shore this summer is a bit sunnier than for other places, insisted Eberz, now busy making decisions about staffing and menus for the season. Colleagues in the real estate business - the front line of the tourism industry - report that summer rentals and lodging reservations are ahead of 2008 by as much as 10 percent in some locations, she said.
NEWS
April 6, 2004
WHERE IS the recession the Democrats are so loudly complaining about? Some pertinent facts: 1. It is next to impossible to get a room in Atlantic City for any weekend. 2. Ninety percent of the summer rentals at the shore have been taken. 3. Tickets to concerts, theaters and sporting events are at a premium. At restaurants, the lines are out the door. 4. The steel mills are booming, the casinos are packed, homes and cars are selling like there's no tomorrow. 5. A Bucks County friend sold 60 building lots ($200-400,000)
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Unlike politics and religion, the weather is supposed to be one of those "safe" topics. Unless, of course, you are at the Jersey Shore. The Shore has evolved into a place where the weather rules everything: the sink or swim of fledgling businesses, the skyrocketing prices of summer rentals - and whether beach towns attract enough crowds and revenue to cover the costs for more police, more maintenance, and more of everything else that is...
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
The notion of slipping into a bathing suit, lathering up with SPF 15 and propping open the beach umbrella is just absurd. The Margate sky on this mid-February Saturday afternoon is layered with dark gray clouds. The choppy, icy ocean is colorless and fierce. The sea breezes are painful. Summer is a lifetime away. Unless you're trying to rent a shore house. "I did know that I should have started earlier," said Tricia Donio, of Hammonton, N.J., as she inspected a two-bedroom apartment in Margate.
LIVING
July 8, 1999 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten best friends from high school and college, all age 19 but one, are renting a weary blue shore house here for the summer. What they are after is not the endless summer but the enduring friendship. Their goals are to create enough memories, to bond so tightly, that long after their high school years fade, after their lives spiral in different directions, they will always have Margate. "After high school, I thought we would all keep in touch, that we'd be friends forever," said Scott Steinberg, one of the guys, who attends college in South Carolina.
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