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Summer School

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NEWS
June 3, 1986 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
For the first time in 15 years, Philadelphia school officials are preparing for a full-scale summer school program for students in all grades. Plans for the $3.9 million summer program were unveiled yesterday, the same day letters went out notifying parents of up to 31,000 public school pupils that their youngsters will not be promoted. The expansion of the summer program - for years limited to 12th-graders who needed one or two courses to graduate - is one way the district says it is giving students extra help in a time of increased standards and tougher grading and promotion policies.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By Mary E. Charest, Special to The Inquirer
Summer school at Bridgeport Elementary in the Upper Merion School District could be eliminated in 1989 and replaced by aides for remedial math and reading during the regular school year. That could be the scenario if the school board, at its meeting tonight, reallocates about $45,000 in federal education funds. According to Mary Kopa, director of curriculum services, 80 students would attend Bridgeport summer school for 24 days at a cost of $39,710, while 120 students would receive remedial classes for 182 days during the regular school year at a cost of $44,167.
SPORTS
September 8, 1988 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
Well, until yesterday, the folks at ESPN had to be really excited about the opportunity to showcase Heisman Trophy hopeful Eric Metcalf tonight when Metcalf's Texas Longhorns visit the Brigham Young Cougars. Then the Longhorns landed at Salt Lake City International Airport, and Texas coach David McWilliams announced that Metcalf wasn't with the team and won't play tonight. It seems that Metcalf got scholarship money for summer school this year, then neglected to do one little thing - go to summer school.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunshine, boring through high windows, overheated the Showalter Middle School in Chester one morning this week as 15-year-old Desiree Womack listed her three reasons for coming to summer school: "The education, the money and the help. " Was that second thing money? Yes, $3.70 an hour, to be exact. This summer, 375 disadvantaged middle-school students in Philadelphia and 190 in Chester are earning full-time pay to study in the morning and work in the afternoon as part of a program to keep them from becoming dropout statistics.
NEWS
July 8, 2009
RE ROBERT Stewart's letter about Arlene Ackerman spending $600,000 on air conditioning for her "babies" during their summer-school sessions: You wrote: "If her babies did their work during the year, they wouldn't be in summer school. " I have three "babies" in summer school, and it's not because they failed any subjects. In fact, my children asked to go to "S.L.A.M. " - Summer Learning and More, a program the district offers to children who'd like academic help or work preparing them for the grade they are going into.
NEWS
July 6, 2009
SCHOOLS CHIEF Arlene Ackerman spent nearly $600,000 so her "babies" would have air-conditioning during summer school. For 30 years, they didn't have air conditioning. They opened the windows. Why can't they do it now? Also, the cost of installing went to union firms and will take a week, starting on a Saturday, a double-time day, and Sunday, ditto. A rough estimate for this whole waste of money is $1.4 million, give or take $100,000. This type of fiscal irresponsibility shouldn't be tolerated.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Many Philadelphia public school students who flunk this June will be off to summer school under a new spending plan unveiled yesterday. But that and other School District measures would contribute to a projected $88.5 million deficit by June 2000, Philadelphia school officials said. They said they expect the district to just about break even on its $1.5 billion operating budget for 1998-99. District financial officials presented their draft budget to the Board of Education's finance committee yesterday.
LIVING
July 12, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Do they still call Coca-Cola "The Real Thing"? I don't know because I've been drinking Diet Pepsi ever since I interviewed the Uh-Huh girls years ago. I also have a hard enough time trying to remember if it's polar bears or golden retrievers or talking lizards that drink Coke. Long before there were any Uh-Huh girls, before animals had learned to drink from cans and bottles, whole TV shows used to be presented by one sponsor. You had the Kraft Music Hall or Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theater.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
For thousands of students across the region, summer school is no way to make up work or squeak through to the next grade - it's an essential part of their school year. "It helps me learn," said Janita Vazquez, 17, a Philadelphia student whose teachers say she's thriving in an extended-school-year program. "It helps me read. " An increasing number of special-education students require longer school years. More students need the summer weeks as a bridge between grades so they do not regress and are ready to learn new skills in September.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Summer school isn't new. But college students have found a new motivation to go: Save money. "In the past, it was, 'No way, I've been in class for 15 weeks, two semesters, I want a break,' " said Danyelle Thurman, the head of advising for Rutgers-Camden's arts and sciences school. "Now . . . the cost of college is increasing, they're trying to get out in a timely manner and not prolong things. " Colleges are increasingly stressing the financial benefits of graduating on time - or even early.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
The Camden School District is offering a daylong, five-week summer school this year for as many as 1,000 students from ages 3 to 19, officials said Tuesday. The free program, from July 6 through Aug. 5, will focus on reading and math but also include field trips, sports, and other curriculums. The voluntary program will include breakfast and lunch, and run from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Students can take school buses to get there, officials said. Summer school programs offered by the district in previous years ran only to midday, and provided no transportation.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
A story in Friday's Inquirer erred in reporting that Philadelphia School District officials expect twice as many high school students to fail courses this year and be required to attend summer school. The district has expanded its summer program to accommodate juniors as well as seniors this year, a move that will double the available slots. However, officials say they do not yet know whether enrollment will grow because final student grades are not in. A story in Friday's Business section erred in reporting the name of the law school at Drexel University.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
This correction appears in Saturday's Inquirer and Daily News: A story in Friday's Inquirer erred in reporting that Philadelphia School District officials expect twice as many high school students to fail courses this year and be required to attend summer school. The district has expanded its summer program to accommodate juniors as well as seniors this year, a move that will double the available slots. However, officials say they do not yet know whether enrollment will grow because final student grades are not in.  The original story follows below.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WHEN COMMUNITY College of Philadelphia was locked down after a report of a gunman last month, you could almost feel the city hold its collective breath. A day before the Oct. 6 lockdown, an online post threatened an attack at an area university. The day thankfully came and went without incident, but then we were wondering if our luck had run out. The lockdown was lifted more than an hour later, with a student who reportedly pulled a gun on another student taken into police custody.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
At Harriton High School in Lower Merion, Joe Dillon avoided the party crowd. But after a girlfriend broke his heart, his buddies talked him into drinking. On the night of August 9, 1976, Dillon, then 21, was drunk when he decided to dive off a wall into the bay at Somers Point, N.J. He dove 13 feet - into what turned out to be 18 inches of water, shattering his fourth cervical vertebra into splinters. His head was attached to his body by only his spinal cord and ligaments. At the hospital, he was put into traction, and for the first six weeks, all he could do was wiggle his shoulders.
SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If there is one thing that has impressed Penn State offensive coordinator John Donovan since he started his job in January, it's the ability of senior running back Bill Belton to fearlessly move his body into the way of a blitzing linebacker on pass plays. "He's a pretty tough kid," Donovan said Monday of Belton, a senior running back from Winslow Township High School in Camden County. "He's a good pass protector, which is something that's not always easy for a running back. "You normally wouldn't think the guy could be great at pass protection," he added, probably in reference to Belton's size of 5-foot-10 and 204 pounds.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the beginning of a work week that promised hot, steamy days, five high school students put on bug repellent, yellow hard hats, gardening gloves, and work boots before Monday's shift at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum. For the next several hours, they pushed wheelbarrows full of water, shoveled soil, and tended to the native plants they added last week to the area in front of the visitor center. The crew members are in the middle of a six-week summer job that calls for them to work on projects varying from removing invasive plants to replacing park benches - thus the hard hats.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kamri Staples was determined to let nothing stop her drive to a career in medicine - not the chaos in Chester's struggling public schools, not lack of money, not even a bureaucratic screw-up that evidently robbed her of a chance to transfer to elite Episcopal Academy. Now, by winning a national honor that makes her a rarity in the troubled district, the 17-year-old can laugh at what she calls her one moment of high anxiety: when she got to watch a gall bladder removal during a Lankenau Science Symposium, right around lunchtime.
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