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Summer Squash

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FOOD
June 23, 1993 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Summer squash is among the better vegetable buys here this week. At 69 cents to 99 cents a pound, prices for both green (zucchini) and yellow squash already are low to moderate and can only get better as those prolific plants blossom closer to home. At this time last year, the best price we found was 79 cents a pound. And there have been times in recent months when this usually ubiquitous vegetable wasn't even available at some markets. Among local crops, bunched radishes, green cabbage and New Jersey greens - lettuce and romaine, arugula, endive, escarole and spinach - are in good supply and well-priced.
FOOD
September 2, 1990 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
The zucchini are coming! The zucchini are coming! Hiding under mulch and poking through the foliage, they are ready to take over your garden, your refrigerator and half your life, if you don't take measures now to stem the tide. There are untold quantities of zucchini breads, stews, soups, muffins and sautes to help kitchen victims cope with the summer produce avalanche. The trick to meeting such an invasion of summer squash with the coolness of a cucumber is simple. You need only an oversize pot, a hefty supply of freezer bags and a recipe that can turn your kitchen into a processing plant.
FOOD
August 26, 2016
Guess from these photos where Inquirer restaurant critic Craig LaBan ate this week. (Answers below.) 1. Corn pudding with blackberries 2. Morel maki sushi 3. Breakfast tart with summer squash For a fresh serving of Craig's Crumb Tracker quiz, join him 2 p.m. Tuesdays on his online chat: inquirer.com/labanchats        Answers: 1. Pumpkin (1713...
FOOD
June 15, 1988 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
"Summer squash" - like "spring chicken" - is a food that's no longer seasonal, thanks to modern transportation. Not only can you get summer squash in winter, you can even get winter squash in summer. Air freight has managed to cancel the calendar. Regardless of the weather or what the calendar says, summer squash is a year-round friend of the figure-conscious, thanks to its exceedingly low calorie count: about 85 per pound. That's because summer squash is 95 percent water. The term "summer squash" refers not only to the familiar cucumber-size yellow kind, but to all high-moisture squash that normally matures in midsummer, including the green striped and speckled Italian squash known as zucchini or marrow or cocozelle.
FOOD
October 4, 2012 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
It may seem odd to turn on the oven when making soup, but roasting really is what makes this soup so spectacular. Roasting the vegetables caramelizes them and brings out nutty flavors that enhance all the other ingredients. Feel free to throw in just about any other vegetables you have lurking in your crisper drawer. Roasted Vegetable Soup Makes 6 servings 2 large yellow onions,    cut into wedges 2 medium zucchini,    diced 2 medium summer    squash, diced 4 large carrots,    peeled and diced 2 medium potatoes,    peeled and diced 2 tablespoons vegeta-    ble or canola oil Salt and ground black    pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground    cumin 1 quart low-sodium    chicken or vegeta-    ble broth Sour cream or yogurt,    to serve Chopped fresh cilant-    ro or parsley, to serve 1. Heat the oven to 400 F. 2. In a large bowl, combine the onions, zucchini, summer squash, carrots, and potatoes.
FOOD
June 29, 1994 | By Johnny Lerro, FOR THE INQUIRER
Recent medical studies indicate that Americans don't get enough calcium in their diet. Well, we know that milk, cheese and yogurt will give us calcium, but did you know that some fruits and vegetables will give you calcium, too? It's true. A standard half-cup serving of many of your favorites will provide you with 2 percent to 6 percent of your daily requirement of calcium. That may not sound like a lot, but have some orange juice or fruit for breakfast, a little salad at lunch, some veggies for dinner, and pretty soon it all adds up. In the vegetable department, look for broccoli, green beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, red and green leaf lettuce, onions, summer squash and sweet potatoes.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its bucolic Montgomery County setting, wonderful 18th-century fieldstone building and intriguing cuisine, the Gypsy Rose Hotel is a charming place for a quiet dinner. The rambling building, part of which dates back 250 years, rises suddenly on a sharp curve in the pretty Perkiomen Creek countryside south of Skippack at Rahns. The original farmhouse, which may have been used as a hospital for Washington's troops after the nearby Battle of the Brandywine, is now the foyer.
FOOD
June 30, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
For a saucy topping for pasta, consider squash. While zucchini and summer squash are traditionally favored as side dishes for pasta, they're even more versatile as an ingredient in the sauce. Instead of slicing and steaming squash as a side dish, shred it into spaghetti-size strands and toss it with linguini, tagliatelli or noodles. Or mix green and yellow squash shredded into skinny strands with the thin spaghetti, known as "vermicelli" for its worm- size diameter. Or try mixing yellow squash strands with green spinach pasta.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may not be a "full service" restaurant, but the cuisine at the new Mirna's Cafe is so delightful, you may not care. I sure don't. The small, noisy place in the center of Jenkintown opened three months ago. Although it has no liquor license, no parking, accepts no credit cards and has no place for nonsmokers to hide from those poisoning the air, Mirna's inherent charm and good food more than compensate. The eclectic, relatively limited menu leans heavily on seafood and pasta dishes prepared in French, Italian and Middle Eastern styles.
FOOD
June 26, 1988 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
It should be easy to lose weight during the summer, if there is any justice. Summer, after all, is when the fruits and vegetables that are supposed to be the dieter's main squeeze are at their finest, cheapest, most- varied, fullest flavored. Assuming that one shops at farmers' markets, farm stands and other such sources of genuine freshness, it's simple to find juicy, wax-free cucumbers that actually taste like something, summer squash and zucchini that neither look nor taste as though they've been through the Punic Wars.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 26, 2016
Guess from these photos where Inquirer restaurant critic Craig LaBan ate this week. (Answers below.) 1. Corn pudding with blackberries 2. Morel maki sushi 3. Breakfast tart with summer squash For a fresh serving of Craig's Crumb Tracker quiz, join him 2 p.m. Tuesdays on his online chat: inquirer.com/labanchats        Answers: 1. Pumpkin (1713...
FOOD
August 19, 2016 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Summer's bounty of perfect fruits and vegetables arrives - at bargain prices - just at the moment when you would rather be at the beach than behind the stove. The desire to fire up the grill is greatly reduced with each 90-plus-degree day. This is the moment to exact maximum flavor from ripe, locally grown produce with minimal time in the kitchen. This is the time when a little bit of salt, olive oil, and herbs can transform a basket of fresh-picked beauties into a scrumptious meal in minutes.
FOOD
August 7, 2015 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Salad season is here. Every color and texture of vegetable is on farm stands, store shelves, or out back in the garden, so you can be shredding, chopping, and arranging magnificent summer feasts with minimum cooking and maximum flavor. And this summer, all we are really craving are salads for dinner, the kind of meal that doesn't leave us feeling weighed down in the heat. Yet, a main-course salad should be substantial and satisfying - with a balance of crisp and soft, crunchy and smooth, tart and sweet.
FOOD
October 25, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The five young chefs were ready with their cookbooks and cutting boards when I arrived for our second class at Bayard Taylor Elementary in North Philadelphia. "What's boo-ca . . . ti-ni?" said Bianca Perez, 11, sounding out the first word in the recipe for our second meal, bucatini with spicy summer squash and white beans. "It's a kind of pasta," I said, digging into the bag of groceries to show them. "It's a little thicker than spaghetti but hollow in the middle. " In addition to teaching these fifth graders healthy, inexpensive recipes for the next two months, I wanted to introduce them to different foods.
FOOD
October 4, 2012 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
It may seem odd to turn on the oven when making soup, but roasting really is what makes this soup so spectacular. Roasting the vegetables caramelizes them and brings out nutty flavors that enhance all the other ingredients. Feel free to throw in just about any other vegetables you have lurking in your crisper drawer. Roasted Vegetable Soup Makes 6 servings 2 large yellow onions,    cut into wedges 2 medium zucchini,    diced 2 medium summer    squash, diced 4 large carrots,    peeled and diced 2 medium potatoes,    peeled and diced 2 tablespoons vegeta-    ble or canola oil Salt and ground black    pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground    cumin 1 quart low-sodium    chicken or vegeta-    ble broth Sour cream or yogurt,    to serve Chopped fresh cilant-    ro or parsley, to serve 1. Heat the oven to 400 F. 2. In a large bowl, combine the onions, zucchini, summer squash, carrots, and potatoes.
FOOD
August 23, 2012 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
For months I've waited for my favorite seasonal crops to arrive. But now, instead of two dozen tomatoes and a few tender zucchini, suddenly my kitchen is laden with a bushel and a peck. This year, determined to stay ahead, I planted only three varieties of summer squash, one plant each, and I promised myself to pick them young. Despite the desire to stay ahead, I have had 35 squash to cook and eat (or give away), and two plants are still going strong. And then there is the basil.
SPORTS
May 14, 1997 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louisa Hall plans to do some heavy traveling this summer, with stops in Newport, R.I., the Netherlands, England and Spain. But the 14-year-old Episcopal Academy freshman won't just be a sightseer. Her journey will be a chance to improve her field hockey and squash skills - particularly those in the latter sport, since she will be facing some of the top European players. Despite petite stature - she's only 5-foot-4 1/2 and 100 pounds - Hall is a national champion in squash, a sport that combines elements of handball and tennis.
FOOD
June 29, 1994 | By Johnny Lerro, FOR THE INQUIRER
Recent medical studies indicate that Americans don't get enough calcium in their diet. Well, we know that milk, cheese and yogurt will give us calcium, but did you know that some fruits and vegetables will give you calcium, too? It's true. A standard half-cup serving of many of your favorites will provide you with 2 percent to 6 percent of your daily requirement of calcium. That may not sound like a lot, but have some orange juice or fruit for breakfast, a little salad at lunch, some veggies for dinner, and pretty soon it all adds up. In the vegetable department, look for broccoli, green beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, red and green leaf lettuce, onions, summer squash and sweet potatoes.
FOOD
June 30, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
For a saucy topping for pasta, consider squash. While zucchini and summer squash are traditionally favored as side dishes for pasta, they're even more versatile as an ingredient in the sauce. Instead of slicing and steaming squash as a side dish, shred it into spaghetti-size strands and toss it with linguini, tagliatelli or noodles. Or mix green and yellow squash shredded into skinny strands with the thin spaghetti, known as "vermicelli" for its worm- size diameter. Or try mixing yellow squash strands with green spinach pasta.
FOOD
June 23, 1993 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Summer squash is among the better vegetable buys here this week. At 69 cents to 99 cents a pound, prices for both green (zucchini) and yellow squash already are low to moderate and can only get better as those prolific plants blossom closer to home. At this time last year, the best price we found was 79 cents a pound. And there have been times in recent months when this usually ubiquitous vegetable wasn't even available at some markets. Among local crops, bunched radishes, green cabbage and New Jersey greens - lettuce and romaine, arugula, endive, escarole and spinach - are in good supply and well-priced.
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