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Summer

FOOD
August 30, 2013 | By Christopher Hirsheimer and Melissa Hamilton, For The Inquirer
Labor Day weekend marks the last of our Friday night summer suppers for friends and family at Canal House, our cookbook publishing studio along the Delaware and Raritan Canal in Lambertville, N.J. These suppers have become a tradition, thanks in part to Fireworks Friday, the spectacle launched from a barge anchored in the Delaware River south of the green iron New Hope-Lambertville bridge. The display is equal to any you'll see on a Fourth of July. We're already licking our chops for this year's finale.
SPORTS
August 23, 2013 | BY JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
NICK APOSTOLU thought his eyes were betraying him. There before him, amid the squalor, lived a family in a squat, gutted home. It looked as if someone dropped a bomb on the place. There was no electricity. No running water. None of the most minimal essentials we take for granted daily. It's when Apostolu, a human 6-5 1/2, 305-pound bulldozer, went to work. Most Division I-caliber football players spend their summers building themselves up to attract heavier interest from major schools.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carly Sokach didn't have much interest in research. For her, it was simply an obligatory requirement for her to apply to medical school. But that changed this summer when the University of Pennsylvania rising junior began working on research that inspired her: She studied whether a questionnaire could tell doctors if a patient with ulcerative colitis was in remission, rather than resorting to a colonoscopy, an invasive procedure. She spent much of her time talking to patients who had the disease.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer; takiffj@phillynews.com
ALL THAT summer rain has made the flowers grow and spawned more pretty fireflies than Gizmo Guy has seen in aeons. But it's also made this an intensely good (and we mean bad) summer for mosquitoes, and sparked lots of pitches for products claiming to ward off the critters. To deal with the onslaught (of bugs and devices), I turned to my expert in all things organically outdoors, Mike McGrath, host of the syndicated radio show "You Bet Your Garden. " (It airs 11 a.m.-noon Saturdays on WHYY 91-FM.)
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its 10 years, Symphony in C's summer camp for South Jersey middle and high school musicians has provided training to more than 500 students. For two weeks each summer, the whine of violins, the clanging of cymbals, and the sounds of tinny horns have filled the halls of Rutgers-Camden. But this year, that rehearsal music sounds a little sweeter, and the coordinators and campers are relishing in it a bit more, knowing that the camp, two weeks of intensive training in orchestra and band instruments, almost didn't happen.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | BY RUSS PARSONS, McClatchey News Service
    JESSICA KOSLOW is rummaging around in her room-sized walk-in refrigerator at Sqirl in Los Angeles, looking for fruit. There are several cases of tiny, intensely flavored Santa Rosa plums. Wait, no. How about some of these dry-farmed Blenheim apricots? She hoists a case onto her shoulder and hurries to her kitchen. It's time to make jam. While home preserving has the reputation of being unforgiving and demanding, watching a master like Koslow, you realize how easy it really is, especially when you start with the kind of fruit that is flooding the markets right now. A former pastry chef, Koslow, of Los Angeles, turned her jam-making hobby into a business, then turned the jam business into a store, turned the store into a coffee shop, turned the coffee shop into a restaurant and now is expanding into the space next door, a gourmet market and wine shop that she will share with her old friend and mentor Lou Amdur.
FOOD
August 9, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
From the byways to the beach, almost any summer meal is better out of a basket. A picnic repast can be as elegant as an orchestra concert under the stars, as simple as a seaside sunset, or both. All it takes is a little planning to fine-dine in your bathing suit. One of my favorite alfresco meals is a store-bought veggie hoagie with eggplant, sharp cheese, broccoli rabe, and roasted long hot peppers, served with a bag of chips and a beer. It's delicious, can be eaten with no plate, and holds up for several hours even in warm weather - considerations that guide me in planning home-cooked menus for meals away from home.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The vast expanse of the Mann Center for the Performing Arts has been filled with sight as much as sound during this summer's Philadelphia Orchestra concerts, touching base with the Fantasia film, The Legend of Zelda video game, and assorted sports heroes of the past. But the core orchestra audience is not forgotten: Wednesday's concert drew 4,000 people for a program as distinguished as any you'd hear downtown at the Kimmel Center. The 36-year-old Ukrainian conductor Kirill Karabits (well-known in England, less so here)
NEWS
August 2, 2013
REACH FOR a beer that calls itself Summersomethingorother, and you really don't know what you're going to come up with. Victory Summer Love ? It's a blond ale. Samuel Adams Summer Ale ? It's a spiced wheat beer. Brooklyn Summer Ale ? It's an English-style pale ale. Sierra Nevada Summerfest ? A Bohemian pilsner. Harpoon Summer Beer is a German-style kolsch.   Breckenridge SummerBright is made with lemon and orange peels.   Cricket Hill Jersey Summer Breakfast Ale is a Belgian-style pale ale. Basically, a brewer can call anything a "summer" beer, as long as it's refreshing.
FOOD
August 2, 2013 | By Michelle Dembo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's the best way to end a long workday? Small bites at a fair price. Good company. And, of course, a cocktail. And the best place to get all three? Happy hour. What follows are some road-tested recommendations for good deals at fun post-work hangouts that will surely cure any case of the stuck-in-the-city-in-the-summer blues. For good, inexpensive small plates and groups who can't decide between a party atmosphere or a professional setting, check out Sampan - where you can get a little of both, plus an extensive menu of $2 to $4 small bites.
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