CollectionsSummit
IN THE NEWS

Summit

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 22, 1986
The return of Vladimir Horowitz to the Soviet Union last week after an absence of more than 60 years, and his brilliant performance in Moscow Sunday, were momentous events in several respects. Bravos were earned on every count. Regarding the concert itself, it was of course an artistic triumph. That was to be expected of perhaps the greatest pianist of this century. It also demonstrated the intrinsic value of U.S.-Soviet cultural exchange programs that were given new life by President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their summit meeting in Geneva last November.
NEWS
August 6, 1987
A scheduling conflict prevented Gov. Casey from attending the opening yesterday of a "summer summit" on the Chesapeake Bay, hosted by Virginia Gov. Gerald L. Baliles. In his place was Pennsylvania Environmental Resources Secretary Arthur S. Davis, who joined Maryland Gov. Donald Schaefer, Washington Mayor Marion Barry and federal environmental officials for the two- day meeting. It's unfortunate Gov. Casey couldn't attend because he would have been able to personally deliver some encouraging news.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By MICHAEL KINSLEY, From the New Republic
"There was no connection between these two releases," said President Reagan about the swap of Nicholas Daniloff for Gennadi Zakharov. He added, regarding the Iceland summit, "This is not a summit. " Everyone was amused by these two obvious lies. Only conservatives were fuming that Reagan should agree to meet with a man who had challenged his "personal assurance" that Daniloff was not a spy. William Safire called this "the most far-reaching, calculated personal insult ever delivered to an American president by a Soviet leader . . . Mr. Gorbachev in effect called him a liar.
NEWS
October 1, 1986
The most surprising outcome of the resolution of the Nicholas Daniloff affair is the scheduling of a meeting of President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in Iceland on Oct. 11-12. Labeled as "preparations" for a full-scale summit conference in the United States, this tete-a-tete offers a lot of political benefits, and relatively fewer risks, for both men. But whether it holds the key to an arms accord that contributes to a safer world is a much tougher question. The Iceland meeting will get both leaders off some political hooks.
NEWS
May 18, 1987 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Still dressed in tights and ballet shoes, Soviet ballet star Aleksander Lunev dozed peacefully yesterday morning on a brick ledge outside the Glassboro State College auditorium, soaking up some rays just a few feet from where East-West history was made two decades ago. The stocky, blond dancer from the Kirov Ballet, oblivious to the international implications, had fled the rigor of rehearsal and the hubbub of the artistic summit taking place inside....
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Mikhail S. Gorbachev arrived in Washington yesterday for his meeting with President Reagan, working people here expressed optimism about the summit and hopes for better relations between the superpowers. The Soviets interviewed on the subfreezing streets of the capital were well-informed - reflecting the exhaustive media coverage the summit has received here - and apparently earnest. But most of them stayed carefully close to the party line, praising disarmament but rejecting Western interference in issues such as emigration and Afghanistan.
NEWS
March 21, 2004 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF0
Getting ready to represent the United States at a simulated summit in El Salvador, Steve Friedman has spent weekends reading up on the depletion of rain forests. The 16-year-old Lower Merion High School sophomore is one of 14 students from Lower Merion and Harriton High Schools traveling to San Salvador this week to explore problems facing Central and South America. The 14 Lower Merion and Harriton students and four more from a handful of other area public schools - including senior Erin Tustin, 17, from Chichester High in Delaware County - will attend the annual "Summit of the Americas.
NEWS
October 31, 1986
Two sets of parents were very concerned about their two young sons who had accidentally locked themselves in a garage. The boys were fascinated with matches and had taken a box of them into the garage. The garage happened to have a quantity of highly inflammable items - cans of gasoline, kerosene, paints, etc. The garage had a small broken window through which the parents could communicate with their boys. Which of the following procedures would people advise the parents to follow?
NEWS
January 12, 2003 | By Tom Bradford FOR THE INQUIRER
Ten years ago, as I stood atop Mount Shasta in Northern California, ice ax in hand, you could say I was a bit out of my element. I mean, yo, I grew up in Philly. I was a city kid. Adventure to me meant being robbed at knifepoint or, better yet, driving on Lombard Street in Center City. So why the mountain? Some friends asked me to go, and my smoggy new home (Los Angeles) was driving me nuts. Why not? So there I was, after a strenuous day of climbing, a few feet from the summit.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Soviet citizen held up the current issue of the weekly newspaper Nedelya and pointed to the cover photograph of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, broadly smiling, in Washington. "Probably, he didn't know what happened in the streets here this week," said the Soviet. He was not himself a dissident or potential emigre, but he was well aware of the violent squelching of demonstrations in Moscow during the "Mikhail and Ron" summit. But Gorbachev did know what happened in Moscow. During his hypnotic news conference Thursday evening in Washington, he was even asked about it - specifically, about what happened last Sunday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 6, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
WEST LONG BRANCH, N.J. - It's hard sometimes, the players said, to keep perspective in the face of such a massive legacy. But consider that the Moorestown girls' lacrosse team entered this season having to replace 13 seniors who went on to play in college. And consider that they lost four starters to injury as the season progressed. And then consider that, through all of it, they were on the field Saturday, competing for a state championship. Most programs would consider it a banner season, a small miracle.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITER
Librarians, let's learn about dollars and sense. The all-day PA Forward Financial Literacy Summit will take place Tuesday, March 22, in partnership with the Southeastern Chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association (SEPLA). Speakers include Dr. Cathy Bowen, PhD, Penn State professor and financial literacy expert, Dr. Daad Rizk, EdD, Penn State financial literacy manager, and yours truly. We'll cover topics such as "Planning for Retirement" and "Big Ticket Personal Purchases," "Budgeting and Moving Past Money as a Taboo Topic," and "Successful Financial Literacy Engagement on College Campuses".
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia will not host Forbes' 30 Under 30 millennial-fest this year, and probably not any time soon. The organizers announced Monday - at a news conference attended by the mayor of Boston and the governor of Massachusetts - that the four-day gathering will head to Boston in October. "I first want to thank Philadelphia for serving as host city over the last two years to kick off our Under 30 Summits," Randall Lane, editor of Forbes magazine, said in a news release. He went on to say that Boston's summit would triple in size and include young entrepreneurs worldwide.
TRAVEL
March 6, 2016
Answer: Utah. The Golden Spike National Historic Site marks the spot where the first transcontinental railroad was completed.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Nearly a week after Vice President Biden visited Philadelphia to announce a new federal "moon shot" to battle cancer, the heads of six leading Pennsylvania cancer centers and other experts gathered in Center City on Thursday to discuss treatment and prevention developments, and sort the promise from the hype. The six directors were panelists at "Cancer Precision Medicine, Big Ideas in Research, Treatment and Prevention," a half-day conference at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not into Instagram photo sharing, YouTube performance clips, or online "zines"? Then the names Lindsey Stirling, Cameron Dallas, and Tavi Gevinson may mean nothing to you. But to the 600-plus young entrepreneurs running and attending the second "Forbes Under 30 Summit" at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, these twentysomethings are major celebrities in the parallel universe of online media. They're innovators working with wits and low-cost technology to disrupt - and perhaps dismantle - the big money status quo, the underlying theme of this three-day rally.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the heels of a momentous papal visit steeped in tradition, Philadelphia is switching gears for an influx of millennial disrupters and game-changers attending the second annual Forbes Under 30 Summit. If you are over 30, you might not recognize some of the featured names, such as 17-year-old Shawn Mendes or 21-year-old Cameron Dallas, two performers who turned social-media popularity on Vine, the video-sharing site, into skyrocketing careers. From Sunday until Wednesday, the summit will more broadly encompass the worlds of tech, science, sports, food, and entertainment.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson boasted of his department's achievements in curtailing crime and repairing its relationship with the community at a Harvard University summit hours after a standout high school football player was gunned down and became Camden's eighth and youngest homicide victim this year. "This is a watershed moment for law enforcement organizations," Thomson told a Cambridge, Mass., audience just after 4:30 p.m. Saturday. He was alluding to the deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of police in Ferguson, Mo.; South Carolina, and elsewhere.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
With an eye toward keeping African American interests at the forefront of the current mayoral campaign, a group of black civic leaders Wednesday outlined plans for a two-day "black political summit" April 11 and 12. The meeting, to be at Dobbins High School, will allow the group to draft an issues agenda for all mayoral and City Council candidates in the May 19 primary election. The candidates will be asked to sign off on positions presented. "We are sick and tired of politicians who come to our community and ask for our vote and disappear," said the Rev. William B. Moore, pastor of Tenth Memorial Baptist Church in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DES MOINES, Iowa - For months, the 2016 Republican presidential race has been dominated by the "invisible primary" scramble for the backing of the party's donor class. On Saturday, it goes grassroots. At least eight likely candidates will give their pitches to 1,500 conservative activists at the Iowa Freedom Summit in Des Moines, trying to seduce the people who pack a punch in the GOP caucuses, where the first votes of the party's nominating process are scheduled to be cast in a little over a year.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|