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NEWS
January 25, 1989 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
Never before, says Moorestown's public works director Ken Jolley, have this community's property owners clamored to have the township's water and sewer inspectors come into their homes. But clamor they have. Since the township informed residents by letter last month that under a new ordinance they have until June 30 to have their homes inspected for illegal connections to Moorestown's sanitary sewer system - or face a stiff surcharge - about 1,500 homeowners have called Jolley asking for an inspector to come around.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We recently installed new granite tile countertops and backsplash in our kitchen. We are noticing that if we place a wet object on the countertop, the granite is stained in that area. Most of the time it fades in a few days, but lately, we are noticing the dark stains staying longer. Is there any way to remove these or to prevent them in the first place? Answer: We have granite countertops and don't have this problem, so I can only tell you what other readers tell me. Most water stains are only a temporary problem.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
Never before, says Moorestown's public works director Ken Jolley, have this community's property owners clamored to have the township's water and sewer inspectors come into their homes. But clamor they have. Since the township informed residents by letter last month that under a new ordinance they have until June 30 to have their homes inspected for illegal connections to Moorestown's sanitary sewer system - or face a stiff surcharge - about 1,500 homeowners have called Jolley asking for an inspector to come around.
REAL_ESTATE
May 19, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, a reader asked for reasons why a wood floor was starting to extrude chips and slivers from between the boards. Doug Sandilands, of Shamrock Flooring in Aston, says it's his guess that the chips and slivers coming out of the floors are from an older type of waxed prefinished floors the industry called Kromar. "These boards are 5/16 inches thick by two inches wide," Sandilands said. "However, the depth from the face of the board to the tongue and groove is only about 1/16 of an inch.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Residents of Kennedy Crossing and the adjacent neighborhood of Cardinal View once again packed Plymouth Township's auditorium this week to learn the results of carbon dioxide testing that began nearly a month ago. And, once again, they went home with unanswered questions. Although officials from the Montgomery County Health Department and the federal Environmental Protection Agency said they had completed the first round of testing in most of the homes, they said additional tests were needed to determine the source of the unusually high levels of carbon dioxide that caused a girl to faint in her Kennedy Crossing basement Sept.
NEWS
January 8, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Over the years we have had numerous water problems with our finished basement. In the far left of the basement, we enclosed the area that has the sump hole and made it a closet. We have a new sump pump in there, and one in the window well outside, which used to overflow when we had severe rain. It seems that even though the window well is piped to a French drain, the amount of water from all the other townhouses in the development backs into it during heavy rain. We had had no problem since we put in the sump pump in the window well.
NEWS
March 3, 1986 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A would-be thief who attempted to crawl into a Bensalem carwash early yesterday morning got stuck in a waste-water trench and had to be rescued by police and firefighters, police said. Peter Joseph Cosegna, 46, of Warminster, was found lodged in a sump trench at the Classic Car Wash at 2629 Route 1 at 1:45 a.m. yesterday, a bag of burglary tools by his side, said Officer Jack Farris of the Bensalem Township Police Department. It took heavy rescue equipment from the Trevose Fire Company, liquid soap, rope and a power saw to free Cosegna, who apparently had spent several hours in the trench before being spotted by neighbors, Farris said.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Last winter, after a snowstorm followed by heavy rain, for the first time in more 100 years, our basement flooded with four to five inches of water. Every time I would pump it out with a portable sump pump I purchased, it filled again. It took almost two weeks to finally dry up. Our plumbing company said it was because the water table in our area rose five feet. Everyone in the area was having the same experience, so the plumber is probably right. Every time we have heavy rain now, we can see various spots on the cellar floor getting damp, and sometimes by the bilko door, it actually gets a puddle.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
Rutledge Borough Council is considering monitoring borough homes to find the cause of increased water flow through the sewage system during heavy rainfall. The proposed action comes in the wake of a DELCORA ultimatum to either fix the problem or pay a fine. DELCORA, the Delaware County Regional Water Quality Control Authority, has been dumping sewage from its treatment plant into the Delaware River because it cannot handle the increased amount of sewage received from the borough during heavy rainfalls, council member Stephen Kidd said at a caucus meeting Tuesday.
NEWS
September 17, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The experts still aren't sure what track Hurricane Isabel will travel, but even if this area doesn't sustain a direct hit, we could face a couple of days of damaging winds and flooding rains. Fortunately, it's still early enough to try to minimize the effects on your property. After Hurricane Andrew flattened southern Florida in 1995, a team of experts examined homes that had failed and the ones that survived. They found four areas that should be checked for weakness: the roof; the windows; the doors; and, if you have one, the garage door.
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NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
All of the Skippack Township residents who had left their homes Sunday night because of a foul odor were set to spend the night at home Tuesday, after investigators conducted more monitoring and found improved conditions in houses. "The levels are significantly lower," Skippack Township Fire Company Chief Haydn Marriott said Tuesday. On Sunday, 151 households in the Fairlawn Court development were evacuated after residents of one house reported smelling a bad odor. An initial reading in the basements of that house and others indicated the presence of the potentially harmful compound hydrogen cyanide.
REAL_ESTATE
May 19, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A few weeks back, a reader asked for reasons why a wood floor was starting to extrude chips and slivers from between the boards. Doug Sandilands, of Shamrock Flooring in Aston, says it's his guess that the chips and slivers coming out of the floors are from an older type of waxed prefinished floors the industry called Kromar. "These boards are 5/16 inches thick by two inches wide," Sandilands said. "However, the depth from the face of the board to the tongue and groove is only about 1/16 of an inch.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We recently installed new granite tile countertops and backsplash in our kitchen. We are noticing that if we place a wet object on the countertop, the granite is stained in that area. Most of the time it fades in a few days, but lately, we are noticing the dark stains staying longer. Is there any way to remove these or to prevent them in the first place? Answer: We have granite countertops and don't have this problem, so I can only tell you what other readers tell me. Most water stains are only a temporary problem.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers
Sure, they said to stay off the roads. But plenty of people took advantage of Sandy's slow start Monday morning to mob the few stores still open in search of last-minute storm supplies. At the Lowes on Roosevelt Boulevard near Grant Avenue, employees helped bob Woudenberg, 39, load a generator into the back of his car. "I've been running around trying to get a generator the past few days with no luck. I probably should have been more proactive a week or so ago," Woudenberg said with a laugh.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question : We bought a raised ranch with a full lower level from an owner of 35 years who disclosed that several times, after rains of five inches, the laundry room area took on water and needed to be "broomed out" (the back door opens to the driveway from the laundry room). We find that several times a year - when heavy rains or large winter thaws come - the laundry room does take on one to two inches of water, which appears to come through the concrete basement floor where it meets the cinder block walls.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We've lived in our house for 18 years (it was built in 1985). Over that time, we've had water in the basement four times, but only in extreme weather conditions, such as the hurricane in August. The water each time is about five gallons total, but enough to damage carpeting, cause a musty smell, and possibly cause mold to grow behind the walls. The water seeps through two walls in the same area, so it is a limited area of exposure. I've had two waterproofing contractors tell me that I need a sump pump and drainage ditch installed around the perimeter.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Last winter, after a snowstorm followed by heavy rain, for the first time in more 100 years, our basement flooded with four to five inches of water. Every time I would pump it out with a portable sump pump I purchased, it filled again. It took almost two weeks to finally dry up. Our plumbing company said it was because the water table in our area rose five feet. Everyone in the area was having the same experience, so the plumber is probably right. Every time we have heavy rain now, we can see various spots on the cellar floor getting damp, and sometimes by the bilko door, it actually gets a puddle.
NEWS
January 8, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Over the years we have had numerous water problems with our finished basement. In the far left of the basement, we enclosed the area that has the sump hole and made it a closet. We have a new sump pump in there, and one in the window well outside, which used to overflow when we had severe rain. It seems that even though the window well is piped to a French drain, the amount of water from all the other townhouses in the development backs into it during heavy rain. We had had no problem since we put in the sump pump in the window well.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | By Josh Goldstein and Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
As South Jersey homeowners and businesses worked to clean up and dry out from Monday's flooding, hardware stores and others were doing brisk business yesterday. Sump pumps, Shop-Vacs and cleaning supplies were the big sellers at Home Depot in Mount Laurel, Lowe's in Maple Shade, and the DuBell Lumber Co. in hard-hit Medford. The focus was cleaning up the damage and preparing for more storms and possible flooding in the forecast. Hardware stores also expected customers to start coming for Sheetrock and other materials to repair damage after things have dried out at bit. "They are still swimming," said Dick Christy, a salesman at DuBell Lumber on Route 70, which had just two sump pumps left.
NEWS
September 17, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The experts still aren't sure what track Hurricane Isabel will travel, but even if this area doesn't sustain a direct hit, we could face a couple of days of damaging winds and flooding rains. Fortunately, it's still early enough to try to minimize the effects on your property. After Hurricane Andrew flattened southern Florida in 1995, a team of experts examined homes that had failed and the ones that survived. They found four areas that should be checked for weakness: the roof; the windows; the doors; and, if you have one, the garage door.
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