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Sun Protection Factor

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NEWS
June 18, 2011
New rules announced Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration should help sun worshipers at the Shore better protect themselves by clarifying the confusing and misleading labeling on sunscreens. With the regulations coming after three - count 'em - three decades of study, they're long overdue. The FDA review went on for at least as long as consumers have been confused by which to use among the dozens of sunscreen products on store shelves. UVB? UVA? Which sun protection factor, or SPF, is best?
BUSINESS
May 11, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
With summer rapidly approaching, sun worshipers looking for a safer way to catch some rays can now buy beach umbrellas and shelters that allow them to tan in the shade. The products are made of a sheer vinyl fabric, known as "pro cutis" - Latin for "for the skin" - developed by a unit of Continental AG, the German steelmaker, and being marketed by Pro Cutis North America Inc. in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The company said the fabric blocks harmful ultraviolet rays known as UVB and UVA2 but allows in 79 percent of the UVA1 rays that cause tanning.
LIVING
July 30, 1995 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Determined to lower your risk of getting cancer, you cut down on fats, give bacon and charbroiled hamburgers wide berth, hold your breath when in the vicinity of cigarette smoke, and avoid alcohol. Then you step outdoors. And virtually every square millimeter of the body you have been working so hard to protect is assaulted by a barrage of ultraviolet light. The attack will reach to the very depths of your skin cells, whacking their DNA and possibly sending them careening down the path toward cancer.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Avoiding painful sunburn and deadly skin cancer should get easier next summer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced new requirements Tuesday for sunscreen labels that officials hope will provide simpler but more thorough information on how to avoid sunburn, skin cancer, and the wrinkles of aging. By next summer, the FDA suggests, be wary of any product that has an SPF number above 50. And regardless of the label, wear a hat. "I think this is great," said Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's Steven Greenbaum, a third-generation dermatologist.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Karen Yatcilla doesn't like freckles. But the 33-year-old Southampton resident has a lot of them, and that's because of the sun. While young, she loved lying in the sun, even though it brought the freckles. But the sun brought something else: Worry. She wondered if some of those new freckles - especially the ones on her back that she couldn't really examine - might be harmful. So Friday, Yatcilla went to a free skin cancer screening at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1987 | By JENNIFER LOWE, Los Angeles Daily News
If you're starting work on the perfect tan, there's something health professionals want you to keep in mind. May is national skin-cancer month. A recent survey by the American Academy of Dermatology in Illinois, which promotes the month, showed people know the sun causes skin cancer, but that they were taking few precautions. "The big emphasis on having a tan, being glamorous and looking healthy is contributing to the fact that skin-cancer incidents are on the rise," said academy spokesman Bill Heineke.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | by Gale Hayman, Special to the Daily News
Look around at the stars today who have paid attention to the warnings about overexposure to the sun. Madonna, Sharon Stone and Kim Basinger, among others, are preserving their beauty by carefully protecting their skin. How, once and for all, do you really protect yourself against the sun? Ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-B rays are the sun's harmful rays, the ones that cause skin cancer and premature wrinkling, and you can't look for them, because they're invisible. They emanate directly from the sun, they're reflected from water, sand and snow, and they're a threat even on cloudy summer days.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They sound almost like magic: sunscreens that last six or eight hours through all sorts of activity, in and out of the water. To anyone who has struggled to reapply sunscreen at the beach or swimming pool on a squirmy, slippery child - or suffered painful consequences after forgetting or missing a spot - they seem like an unquestionable godsend. Some of them may be just that. But on Friday, the Federal Trade Commission raised a bright-red flag about one of the productsflooding the market recently with promises of "all-day" protection.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Are you one of those paler-than-pale people whose skin burns every time you step into the sunlight? Do you long to look like George Hamilton - the Hollywood actor with the perpetually bronzed epidermis? Help is on the way. A team of University of Arizona researchers has found that injections of a synthetic hormone can bring about a tanned, healthy-looking complexion without risking exposure to the sun's harmful rays. And, one Cincinnati researcher believes the hormone may make you smarter and improve your memory.
NEWS
May 28, 1993 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For sun worshipers, the news this spring has been scary. In April a team of NASA scientists said the ozone layer had eroded to record levels - and that the greatest losses were over heavily populated areas, such as New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. What this means to the millions of vacationers who throng to the shore each summer is this: Better take special precautions to make sure you aren't a victim of the sun's potentially deadly ultraviolet (UV) rays. As the ozone layer thins, medical experts believe the number of cases of skin cancer will increase.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2011
New rules announced Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration should help sun worshipers at the Shore better protect themselves by clarifying the confusing and misleading labeling on sunscreens. With the regulations coming after three - count 'em - three decades of study, they're long overdue. The FDA review went on for at least as long as consumers have been confused by which to use among the dozens of sunscreen products on store shelves. UVB? UVA? Which sun protection factor, or SPF, is best?
BUSINESS
June 15, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Avoiding painful sunburn and deadly skin cancer should get easier next summer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced new requirements Tuesday for sunscreen labels that officials hope will provide simpler but more thorough information on how to avoid sunburn, skin cancer, and the wrinkles of aging. By next summer, the FDA suggests, be wary of any product that has an SPF number above 50. And regardless of the label, wear a hat. "I think this is great," said Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's Steven Greenbaum, a third-generation dermatologist.
NEWS
June 3, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most adolescents avoid sunscreen like a summer reading list. It's messy, inconvenient and, worst of all, not cool. Compared to a golden tan today, the distant threat of skin cancer seems too remote to worry about. A new study has found that only 34 percent of adolescents use sunscreen routinely during the summer. More than 80 percent reported at least one sunburn, and 36 percent reported three burns or more. Peer pressure was a leading culprit. Teens who had friends with tans were more likely to get multiple burns, the study found.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
If you understand all the stuff on the labels of sunscreen and tanning lotion bottles, you must be a chemist. The rest of us who read, for example, that a product is "non-comedogenic," just assume that's a good thing. (And we are right, in this case: Non-comedogenic means it won't clog your pores.) We asked experts from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to decode sunscreen labels for us. DO "ALL DAY PROTECTION" AND "WATERPROOF" MEAN MY SUNSCREEN WILL STAY ON WHILE I SWIM?
LIVING
June 21, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to make sunscreen products less confusing, the Food and Drug Administration has issued new rules for testing and labeling them. So far, confusion is growing. Several major news outlets inaccurately reported that the FDA is nixing the "sun protection factor" (SPF) on labels in favor of three categories of protection: minimum, moderate or high. In fact, the FDA says, the categories are optional. The SPF number, which indicates protection from sunburning rays, primarily ultraviolet B (UVB)
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | by Gale Hayman, Special to the Daily News
Look around at the stars today who have paid attention to the warnings about overexposure to the sun. Madonna, Sharon Stone and Kim Basinger, among others, are preserving their beauty by carefully protecting their skin. How, once and for all, do you really protect yourself against the sun? Ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-B rays are the sun's harmful rays, the ones that cause skin cancer and premature wrinkling, and you can't look for them, because they're invisible. They emanate directly from the sun, they're reflected from water, sand and snow, and they're a threat even on cloudy summer days.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They sound almost like magic: sunscreens that last six or eight hours through all sorts of activity, in and out of the water. To anyone who has struggled to reapply sunscreen at the beach or swimming pool on a squirmy, slippery child - or suffered painful consequences after forgetting or missing a spot - they seem like an unquestionable godsend. Some of them may be just that. But on Friday, the Federal Trade Commission raised a bright-red flag about one of the productsflooding the market recently with promises of "all-day" protection.
LIVING
July 30, 1995 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Determined to lower your risk of getting cancer, you cut down on fats, give bacon and charbroiled hamburgers wide berth, hold your breath when in the vicinity of cigarette smoke, and avoid alcohol. Then you step outdoors. And virtually every square millimeter of the body you have been working so hard to protect is assaulted by a barrage of ultraviolet light. The attack will reach to the very depths of your skin cells, whacking their DNA and possibly sending them careening down the path toward cancer.
NEWS
May 28, 1993 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For sun worshipers, the news this spring has been scary. In April a team of NASA scientists said the ozone layer had eroded to record levels - and that the greatest losses were over heavily populated areas, such as New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. What this means to the millions of vacationers who throng to the shore each summer is this: Better take special precautions to make sure you aren't a victim of the sun's potentially deadly ultraviolet (UV) rays. As the ozone layer thins, medical experts believe the number of cases of skin cancer will increase.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
With summer rapidly approaching, sun worshipers looking for a safer way to catch some rays can now buy beach umbrellas and shelters that allow them to tan in the shade. The products are made of a sheer vinyl fabric, known as "pro cutis" - Latin for "for the skin" - developed by a unit of Continental AG, the German steelmaker, and being marketed by Pro Cutis North America Inc. in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The company said the fabric blocks harmful ultraviolet rays known as UVB and UVA2 but allows in 79 percent of the UVA1 rays that cause tanning.
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