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Sundance Film Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The 1994 Sundance Film Festival came to a close last weekend, with 7,000 filmmakers, agents, publicists and critics folding up their celluar phones and heading home, and the little Utah ski resort of Park City struggling to return to normal. Prize-winners at the Robert Redford-sponsored fete, which celebrates independent American cinema and, this year, was strong in movies about family dysfunction and bodily functions, included: Spanking the Monkey, David Russell's offbeat Oedipal drama, which took home the Audience Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1995 | By Harlan Jacobson, FOR THE INQUIRER
It may be the only spot in Utah where, before a movie starts, an official gives the order: "OK, everybody, it's time to turn off your cellular phones. " That's how things begin at the Sundance Film Festival, which, since 1985, has evolved from a teensy gathering of granola-crunching filmmakers into the film-industry equivalent of the running of the bulls at Pamplona. This year's event attracted more than 8,000 people to see roughly 100 movies, of which 16 documentaries and 18 fiction features were in official competition.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
DREAMBOAT Matt Katzenbach, of Salt Lake City (at right in photo), is not related to former Daily News intern and Oscar nominee Bradley Cooper. Nor, quite obviously, is Matt's identical twin, Scott (the handsome fellow on the left). Nonetheless, the Arizona-born brothers bear a striking resemblance to the Rydal-raised star of Silver Linings Playbook. Way back since the days of Alias , from L.A. to London to Bangkok, the siblings have, with increasing frequency, had to answer the same question from strangers: "Do you know who you look like?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
THE SUNDANCE Film Festival announced its in-competition films for the 2012 fest and Philly is repped quite nicely (and we're not just talking about "Filly Brown," the story of a Hispanic girl rising through the ranks of the hip-hop elite). In the U.S. Dramatic Competition is "The Comedy," starring Temple boys Eric Wareheim and Tim Heidecker (of "Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job" fame), directed by musician Rick Alverson. Here's the synopsis: Indifferent even to the prospects of inheriting his father's estate, Swanson whiles away his days with a group of aging Brooklyn, N.Y., hipsters, engaging in small acts of recreational cruelty and pacified boredom.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011
You've probably walked over them with nary a thought, the mysterious tiles set in cement around our city. The tiles with their cryptic messages - "Toynbee Idea/In Kubrick's 2001/Resurrect Dead/On Planet Jupiter," for example - have intrigued the observant for decades. And they aren't limited to Philly, although it took Philadelphia first-time filmmaker Jon Foy to make a movie about them. He teamed up with local Toynbee enthusiast Justin Duerr (pictured), along with Steve Weinik and Colin Smith, and set out to tell the story in a documentary called "Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011 | BY MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Chicago Tribune
SET IN IRAN but shot in Lebanon, for obvious reasons, the coming-of-age drama "Circumstance" stars two photogenic and expressive marvels, Nikohl Boosheri and Sarah Kazemy, as teenage friends and lovers living under the thumb of an oppressive regime. Modern-day Tehran comes alive in the underground club sequences of New York-based writer-director Maryam Keshavarz's feature. Yet the film wages an internal battle between its ripely sensual atmosphere and its often stilted pacing and plotting.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big news from the Sundance Film Festival, which handed out the awards Saturday night: Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles , directed by Willow Grove native Jon Foy , won the U.S. Documentary Competition Directing Award. Foy followed musician/artist Justin Duerr's search for the origin of the so-called Toynbee tiles, which are implanted in streets around the world. Most are in Philadelphia. "I had no idea that such things were possible in life. Just a few weeks ago I was a housecleaner," Foy told the assembled, according to Sundance's blog.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2010 | By Dan Gross
BRISTOL NATIVE actor Charlie Saxton has a big plot line coming up on HBO's "Hung" Sunday and the following week, but he doesn't want to give away details. "It's the best acting I've had a chance to do on the show," says the 20-year-old, who plays the teenage son of a well-endowed male prostitute and teacher. Saxton will be seen in the film "Twelve," directed by Joel Schu- "Twelve" premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January. He just shot a movie called "I Am Ben," co-written and directed by his "Bandslam" co-star, Gaelan Connell , and also featuring Tim Jo and Elvy Yost from "Bandslam.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | BY JOHN HORN, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - It's hard enough to get into the Sundance Film Festival - more than 10,000 features, documentaries and shorts were submitted for just a few dozen slots in this year's festival. But it's almost equally hard to leave the nation's top gathering for independent film with a distribution deal. Only a handful of Sundance titles receive a meaningful theatrical release. Determined to break that distribution bottleneck, the Sundance Institute on Wednesday launched an initiative that for the first time packages festival films under the Sundance name and offers them for simultaneous viewing on six of the Internet's biggest video platforms - Apple Inc.'s iTunes, Amazon.com, Hulu, Netflix Inc., Google Inc.'s YouTube and Rainbow Media's SundanceNow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Every January, the Sundance Film Festival can be counted on for several things. The presence of a John Hawkes movie. "Intimate" dinner parties for 200 people. And eternal sunniness about the film-sales market. That optimism is running particularly high at this year's event, which opened Thursday in Park City, Utah. The country's most prominent film festival is coming off one of its most robust markets ever, as more than two dozen independently produced movies landed distribution deals last January.
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NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Norristown's Theatre Horizon on Thursday opens Lobby Hero , Kenneth Lonergan's 2001 drama. Director Matthew Decker and cast will be unspooling a provocative comedy of errors embracing hot-button topics (racial profiling, police brutality, gender politics). Lonergan, 53, is the bluntly lyrical author of the Oscar-nominated scripts for 2002's Gangs of New York and 2000's You Can Count on Me (the latter of which he directed), as well the critically acclaimed 1996 Off-Broadway hit This Is Our Youth . In January, Lonergan's newest cinematic effort, Manchester by the Sea , which he wrote and directed, screened at the Sundance Film Festival.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
DREAMBOAT Matt Katzenbach, of Salt Lake City (at right in photo), is not related to former Daily News intern and Oscar nominee Bradley Cooper. Nor, quite obviously, is Matt's identical twin, Scott (the handsome fellow on the left). Nonetheless, the Arizona-born brothers bear a striking resemblance to the Rydal-raised star of Silver Linings Playbook. Way back since the days of Alias , from L.A. to London to Bangkok, the siblings have, with increasing frequency, had to answer the same question from strangers: "Do you know who you look like?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
M att Katzenbach , 27, and his twin brother Scott have been mistaken so frequently for 41-year-old former Daily News intern and current movie star Bradley Cooper , that Matt finally decided to put his look to the test last month at the Sundance Film Festival. His friends dared him to get past the velvet ropes. And he made a short video about his Sundance adventures as alter-ego Cradley Booper. (Watch it online here: .) "The entire time I never stated that I was him . . . They looked at me and said, 'Come right in,'" Katzenbach told the New York Post's Page Six. "It started when I was a teenager," Matt said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2016 | By Harlan Jacobson, For The Inquirer
PARK CITY, Utah - A slave rebellion and a personal political story came out on top at the Sundance Film Festival on Saturday night. After bootstrapping his film for seven years, African American actor-director-producer Nate Parker brought his historical drama The Birth of a Nation , about the 1831 slave uprising led by Nat Turner in Southampton County, Va., to the festival and took home the two biggest dramatic film prizes: the Grand Jury Award...
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
PARK CITY, Utah - As the controversy over the Oscars' lack of diversity raged, a film about a bloody slave revolt set a record for the biggest sale in Sundance Film Festival history. Nate Parker's The Birth of a Nation, which he directed, cowrote, and stars in as Nat Turner, the leader of an 1831 rebellion against Virginia slaveowners, was acquired by Fox Searchlight after an all-night bidding war for a reported $17.5 million, obliterating the $10.5 million Sundance record set by Little Miss Sunshine in 2006.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IF WE CONFUSE "Me and Earl and the Dying Girl" with other movies famously adapted from young-adult cancer novels, the fault is not in our stars, but in ourselves. This is a hearse of a different color, and if that sounds like the sort of awful pun you'd expect from a geeky adolescent, be advised you'll find more just like it in "Me and Earl," cleverly adapted by Jesse Andrews from his cheeky YA book. Two of the title characters are high school boys who make impish movie shorts that riff on the film classics they watch during lunch so that they don't have to hang out with other kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
THE STARS of the new teens-confronting-cancer movie are sick and tired of talking about that other teens-confronting-cancer movie. "It's annoying!" said Olivia Cooke, star of "Me and Earl and the Dying Girl," a movie she was already in the midst of making when "The Fault in Our Stars" hit theaters last year. "It's almost like people want to start a rivalry, or create this tension," Cooke said, during a brief visit to Philadelphia with co-star Thomas Mann. "Someone says this, someone else says that and I don't give a [crap]
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Seeing the movie based on her graphic novel, The Diary of a Teenage Girl , premiere at the Sundance Film Festival last week was an experience Phoebe Gloeckner will never forget. It's also one she doesn't entirely remember. Gloeckner, 54 and Philadelphia-raised, recalled a few days later that "it was almost like standing by the railroad tracks and watching a really long train whiz by. You know it's a train, but after it's gone, you can't remember any of the particular cars. "   Published in 2002, her book is a hybrid that mixes prose and comics to tell the story of a sexually curious young woman named Minnie Goetze growing up in the libertine San Francisco of the mid-1970s.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
PARK CITY, Utah - Growing up in Huntingdon Valley in the 1980s, Benson Lee loved the teen comedies of that spirited time, especially John Hughes classics like The Breakfast Club and Sixteen Candles . The music, the style, the "youthful attitude" - those films were, he says, "such a great escape for me. " There was just one problem. Lee, a second-generation Korean American, "hated the depiction of Asian characters," like Sixteen Candles' Long Duk Dong, a buffoonish exchange student whose appearances were introduced with ringing gongs.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Since its beginnings, the Sundance Film Festival has been where documentary films come to be born. And this year, three docs with Pennsylvania ties are making news. Amir Bar-Lev's documentary Happy Valley focuses on the Jerry Sandusky scandal. In one sequence, we see a standoff between tourists trying to take a picture by the statue of late Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, and an elderly man with a handwritten sign accusing Paterno of covering up for a child molester. As the tourists verbally abuse the old man, some pushing him aside as he tries to spoil their shots, the battle over the legacy of Paterno and Penn State devolves into a shoving match from which neither side emerges touched.
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