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NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Trudy Rubin
No one could help being moved by the scenes of Iraqis lining up to vote in elections on Sunday. Those Iraqis deserve our admiration and congratulations. But Americans need to restrain their euphoria or they will be as disappointed as they were after President Bush declared Mission Accomplished. These elections could lead to more violence and to the division of the country, if the aftermath isn't handled right. Sunday's ballot was about a shift of power - from the minority of Sunni Muslims to the Shiite majority that suffered under Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Charles Krauthammer
In 1864, 11 of the 36 United States did not participate in the presidential election. Was Lincoln's election therefore illegitimate? In 1868, three years after the security situation had, shall we say, stabilized, three states (not insignificant ones: Texas, Virginia and Mississippi) did not participate in the election. Was Grant's election illegitimate? There has been much talk that if the Iraqi election is held and some Sunni Arab provinces (perhaps three of the 18) do not participate, the election will be illegitimate.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
QALACHWALAN, Iraq - The Sunni vice president wanted for allegedly running a hit squad in Iraq on Friday accused Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki of waging a campaign against Sunnis and pushing the country toward sectarian war. In an interview, Tariq al-Hashemi said Maliki wants to get rid of all political rivals and run Iraq like a "one-man show. " The comments by Iraq's highest-level Sunni political figure reflect the mounting sectarian tensions surrounding the confrontation between him and the prime minister that have hiked fears that Iraq could be thrown into new violence following the exit of American troops.
NEWS
February 14, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
The odds weren't looking good yesterday for the United States and its hand-picked candidate. But there are still a couple of cards to be played. But, according to final results released yesterday, it appeared clergy-backed Shiites and independence-minded Kurds swept to victory in Iraq's landmark elections, propelling to power the groups that suffered most under Saddam Hussein and forcing Sunni Arabs to the margins for the first time in modern history. But the Shiites' 48 percent of the vote is far short of the two-thirds majority needed to control the 275-member National Assembly.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Qassim Abdul-Zahra, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraq's Shiite-led government issued an arrest warrant Monday for the Sunni vice president, accusing him of running a hit squad that assassinated government and security officials - extraordinary charges a day after the last U.S. troops left the country. The vice president, Tariq al-Hashemi, left Baghdad on Sunday for the semiautonomous Iraqi region of Kurdistan, presumably hoping that Kurdish authorities would not turn him in. Investigative judges banned him the same day from traveling outside Iraq.
NEWS
August 24, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter, Richard Chin and Mohammed al-Dulaimy INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Top Sunni Muslim leaders lashed out yesterday against a draft constitution given to the Iraqi parliament the day before, threatening to mobilize voters against it in an October referendum that could split the nation even further along sectarian lines. Shiite Muslim politicians, from the majority group that controls Iraq's government, said that they wanted to work out a deal with the Sunnis, but that they planned to push the document through the parliament this week and then present it to the Iraqi public for a vote.
NEWS
April 4, 2005 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Iraqi lawmakers elected a Sunni Arab as speaker of parliament yesterday, and chose Shiite and Kurdish representatives as his deputies, opening the way to formation of a government. The vote for Hajim al-Hassani, the current minister of industry and mines, gave the country's minority Sunnis a highly visible role in the National Assembly and raised hopes that Iraq's tentative experiment in democracy might be gaining traction. As politicians have bargained and bickered over how to structure a government among the Shiites, Kurds and Sunnis, the initial euphoria over the historic parliamentary election on Jan. 30 has dissipated, and Iraqis beset by power cuts and water shortages have grown increasingly frustrated.
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Mohammed al Dulaimy and Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Masar Sarhan, a popular student leader at Baghdad University, threw a party on campus this week to celebrate the Shiite Muslim leaders of Iraq's new government. Religious songs blared and students read poetry congratulating the Shiites for taking power. Four hours later, three gunmen followed the 24-year-old Sarhan and shot him to death blocks from his home in the capital. The campus, already simmering with sectarian tension, exploded with violent demonstrations that continued yesterday.
NEWS
December 28, 2008 | By Trudy Rubin
Christmas week is an appropriate time to write about a district here called Ameriyah. Eighteen months ago, Ameriyah was a hellhole where al-Qaeda in Iraq ran rampant, assisted by local resistance groups and criminal gangs. It was a predominantly Sunni Arab neighborhood, where Shiites were expelled or murdered, along with Sunnis who didn't cooperate with the killers. Shops were shuttered, and families were afraid to leave their houses. Suicide car bombers would propel their vehicles out of Ameriyah and target U.S. convoys on the adjacent airport road, which came to be known as the Highway of Death.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Ever since key Iraqi and Syrian cities fell to ISIS last month, the administration has been scrambling to adjust its tactics. Rather than revamp a failed strategy, U.S. officials now appear ready to rely (at least tacitly) on Iran to help roll back the jihadis. This is especially true in Iraq, where Iranian-backed Shiite militias have proven more effective in fighting ISIS than the Iraqi army has. Previously wary of these Shiite militias - lest they inflame sectarian tensions and push more Sunni Iraqis into the ISIS camp - U.S. officials have now dropped objections to their playing a major role.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
After ISIS captured the key Iraqi city of Ramadi last week, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter blamed the stunning loss on "a failure of the Iraqi forces to fight. " Allied air strikes were "effective," he said, but the Iraqis lacked the will to confront ISIS. That careless TV sound bite sums up why the administration's efforts to degrade and defeat ISIS are stalling. You'd never know from Carter's complaint that U.S. tactical and strategic errors, including an ineffective air campaign, contributed mightily to the debacle.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Anyone who wants to understand how ISIS can be rolled back needs to heed the message of two Sunni Arabs who visited Washington this week. I'm not referring to the Saudi crown prince and his deputy, who came to seek assurances from President Obama that he's not cozying up to Tehran. (When it comes to ousting ISIS, the Saudis are as much a part of the problem as they are part of the solution.) Rather, I'm referring to two prominent Iraqi politicians who came to warn that ISIS can't be defeated unless Washington helps Iraqi Sunnis who want to drive the jihadis out. One of the visitors was Rafe al-Issawi, an urbane, English-speaking physician who was once Iraq's respected finance minister.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
AMMAN, Jordan - When ISIS jihadis poured into Iraq from Syria in June and attacked Sheikh Abdullah al-Yawar's compound, he urged the Iraqi government to fly weapons to a nearby airfield so his Sunni tribesmen could hit back. But the Iraqi defense minister refused Yawar's offer, which might have prevented the capture of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. After Mosul fell, Yawar asked Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to let him recruit two battalions of tribesmen to police the border and prevent more jihadis from crossing.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
SolarCity Corp., the nation's largest rooftop photovoltaic developer, is hoping a new day is dawning for solar in Southeastern Pennsylvania. The San Mateo, Calif., company announced Thursday a bundle of new financing options aimed at customers in the Peco Energy Co. service territory. SolarCity and its competitors typically install their systems on customers' roofs for no money down. The campaign is aimed at reversing the shrinkage in the Pennsylvania solar market, which went into hibernation after 2011, when federal and state incentives dwindled.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | Ellen Gray, The Daily News
ONLY TWO episodes remain of the 10th season of "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia" (10 p.m. Wednesdays, FXX), but there's plenty of "Sunny" ahead for Philly's Rob McElhenney, the show's creator, and Kaitlin Olson, his wife, co-star and fellow owner of Old City's Mac's Tavern. The couple spoke with Ellen Gray about working together - and apart - and about why the show, already renewed through season 12, could conceivably go past that. Q You work together and you're coming up in September on seven years of marriage.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Florida Gov. Rick Scott is headed to Philadelphia on Monday - but he's not coming north on a trade mission. Depending on whom you talk to, the Republican governor is either coming to woo companies to the sunnier, more tax-friendly South, or "poaching" Pennsylvania jobs. Either way, the Keystone State's new Democratic governor is not amused. "It's a political stunt," said Jeff Sheridan, spokesman for Gov. Wolf. "The stagnant economy we inherited is not our doing, yet he didn't come under our predecessor.
TRAVEL
November 23, 2014 | By Bob Ecker, For The Inquirer
LAKE TAHOE, Calif. - El NiƱo is rumored to be back in the Pacific Ocean and if the little baby is good, the western slopes will see moderate to ample amounts of snow this season. In fact Colorado, Utah, and even California received up to 10 inches of fresh snow the third weekend in October. If you've never been skiing out West, you're missing out. It's generally much warmer, sunnier, way higher, less expensive, and far less crowded than at resorts in the East. Here's some of what's happening at western ski resorts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
R OB McELHENNEY is getting behind the camera to direct his first movie, and it's nothing like his TV show, "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. " The St. Joe's Prep grad (and booster - he regularly speaks at alumni events) will direct a children's movie. Yep, the co-creator of the wonderfully perverse "It's Always Sunny" is going the family-film route with "Figment," a "Goonies"-style adventure movie about a boy and his family whose fears come to life. So, how'd he get the gig his first time out of the gate (although, to be fair, McElhenney directed two episodes of "It's Always Sunny" in its early run)
NEWS
September 2, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca and David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writers
"Here we go, Chilladelphia. " So said Kenny Vasoli of Vacationers as the band kicked off Day 2 of the Budweiser Made in America musical block party on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia. Sunday promised lots of music, as long as the rain held off. And while a brief early downpour did not deter fans of weather-delayed rapper Danny Brown, a storm did force suspension of the festival around 6:15 p.m. Would Made in America return? Gates reopened around 7 p.m. The curfew was extended to midnight, and a new set list was announced to accommodate the night's biggest acts: Pharrell Williams, Tiesto, and Kings of Leon.
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