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NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Trudy Rubin
No one could help being moved by the scenes of Iraqis lining up to vote in elections on Sunday. Those Iraqis deserve our admiration and congratulations. But Americans need to restrain their euphoria or they will be as disappointed as they were after President Bush declared Mission Accomplished. These elections could lead to more violence and to the division of the country, if the aftermath isn't handled right. Sunday's ballot was about a shift of power - from the minority of Sunni Muslims to the Shiite majority that suffered under Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Charles Krauthammer
In 1864, 11 of the 36 United States did not participate in the presidential election. Was Lincoln's election therefore illegitimate? In 1868, three years after the security situation had, shall we say, stabilized, three states (not insignificant ones: Texas, Virginia and Mississippi) did not participate in the election. Was Grant's election illegitimate? There has been much talk that if the Iraqi election is held and some Sunni Arab provinces (perhaps three of the 18) do not participate, the election will be illegitimate.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
QALACHWALAN, Iraq - The Sunni vice president wanted for allegedly running a hit squad in Iraq on Friday accused Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki of waging a campaign against Sunnis and pushing the country toward sectarian war. In an interview, Tariq al-Hashemi said Maliki wants to get rid of all political rivals and run Iraq like a "one-man show. " The comments by Iraq's highest-level Sunni political figure reflect the mounting sectarian tensions surrounding the confrontation between him and the prime minister that have hiked fears that Iraq could be thrown into new violence following the exit of American troops.
NEWS
February 14, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
The odds weren't looking good yesterday for the United States and its hand-picked candidate. But there are still a couple of cards to be played. But, according to final results released yesterday, it appeared clergy-backed Shiites and independence-minded Kurds swept to victory in Iraq's landmark elections, propelling to power the groups that suffered most under Saddam Hussein and forcing Sunni Arabs to the margins for the first time in modern history. But the Shiites' 48 percent of the vote is far short of the two-thirds majority needed to control the 275-member National Assembly.
NEWS
August 24, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter, Richard Chin and Mohammed al-Dulaimy INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Top Sunni Muslim leaders lashed out yesterday against a draft constitution given to the Iraqi parliament the day before, threatening to mobilize voters against it in an October referendum that could split the nation even further along sectarian lines. Shiite Muslim politicians, from the majority group that controls Iraq's government, said that they wanted to work out a deal with the Sunnis, but that they planned to push the document through the parliament this week and then present it to the Iraqi public for a vote.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Qassim Abdul-Zahra, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraq's Shiite-led government issued an arrest warrant Monday for the Sunni vice president, accusing him of running a hit squad that assassinated government and security officials - extraordinary charges a day after the last U.S. troops left the country. The vice president, Tariq al-Hashemi, left Baghdad on Sunday for the semiautonomous Iraqi region of Kurdistan, presumably hoping that Kurdish authorities would not turn him in. Investigative judges banned him the same day from traveling outside Iraq.
NEWS
April 4, 2005 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Iraqi lawmakers elected a Sunni Arab as speaker of parliament yesterday, and chose Shiite and Kurdish representatives as his deputies, opening the way to formation of a government. The vote for Hajim al-Hassani, the current minister of industry and mines, gave the country's minority Sunnis a highly visible role in the National Assembly and raised hopes that Iraq's tentative experiment in democracy might be gaining traction. As politicians have bargained and bickered over how to structure a government among the Shiites, Kurds and Sunnis, the initial euphoria over the historic parliamentary election on Jan. 30 has dissipated, and Iraqis beset by power cuts and water shortages have grown increasingly frustrated.
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Mohammed al Dulaimy and Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Masar Sarhan, a popular student leader at Baghdad University, threw a party on campus this week to celebrate the Shiite Muslim leaders of Iraq's new government. Religious songs blared and students read poetry congratulating the Shiites for taking power. Four hours later, three gunmen followed the 24-year-old Sarhan and shot him to death blocks from his home in the capital. The campus, already simmering with sectarian tension, exploded with violent demonstrations that continued yesterday.
NEWS
December 28, 2008 | By Trudy Rubin
Christmas week is an appropriate time to write about a district here called Ameriyah. Eighteen months ago, Ameriyah was a hellhole where al-Qaeda in Iraq ran rampant, assisted by local resistance groups and criminal gangs. It was a predominantly Sunni Arab neighborhood, where Shiites were expelled or murdered, along with Sunnis who didn't cooperate with the killers. Shops were shuttered, and families were afraid to leave their houses. Suicide car bombers would propel their vehicles out of Ameriyah and target U.S. convoys on the adjacent airport road, which came to be known as the Highway of Death.
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NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
Kaitlin Olson , who has become a household name thanks to It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia , said during the Los Angeles press event for Finding Dory that she will be starring in another TV series this fall. "I am doing a television show in the fall called The Mick for Fox," Olson told Daily News Comics Guy Jerome Maida . "I'm very excited about it and it just got picked up. " "It's about a woman named Mickey who's kind of a piece of work," she laughed. " Olson made it clear she will still be doing the show that has become almost as synonymous with the city as cheesesteaks and Rocky Balboa.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Sunny's Omelet Makes 2 servings 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 ounces baby spinach 4 ounces of white mushrooms, sliced Sprig of fresh or pinch of dried thyme (optional) 4 large eggs 2 teaspoons butter 1. Preheat a 10-inch nonstick sauté pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes. 2. When the pan is hot, add oil to the pan and swirl to coat the bottom. 3. Add the mushrooms and thyme (if using) to the pan and sauté for 3-5 minutes. 4. If you used a sprig of fresh thyme, remove it and discard, add the spinach to the pan with the mushrooms, and add a pinch of salt and a pinch of pepper (optional)
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
The Bachelor Ben Higgins takes the lead on ABC's best game show. 8 p.m. Monday on ABC. New Girl The sweet, aging ensemble sitcom returns for an interesting season in which star Zooey Deschanel takes a maternity break and is replaced by Megan Fox. Yes, Megan Fox. This means a whole new Tuesday lineup for Fox. Brooklyn 99 starts at 8:30 p.m., Grandfathered moves to 9, and The Grinder moves to 9:30. New Girl is on at 8 p.m. Tuesday on Fox. Killing Fields Barry Levinson and Tom Fontana (Homicide: Life on the Street)
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
After the grim foreign-policy news from the Mideast in 2015, can we hope for anything better in the new year? That would be a relief, after a year in which ISIS thrived amid the Mideast chaos and civil wars that flooded Europe with one million refugees, half of them from Syria. So is there any reason to expect things to improve in 2016? After all, in December the world's major powers agreed on a framework plan for ending the Syrian civil war, right? And the Iraqi army (retrained, yet again, by U.S. officers)
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
How should the United States respond to Islamic State attacks in Paris? The response from the Republican presidential candidates has been to whip up hysteria over Syrian refugees and hostility toward all Muslims - with rhetoric so repulsive that it shames the country. Ben Carson likened refugees to "rabid dogs," while Donald Trump said he would "absolutely" create a database to track Muslims inside the country. Much easier to play the demagogue than to present a detailed plan. To her credit, Hillary Clinton did just that in a speech to the Council on Foreign Relations on Thursday.
REAL_ESTATE
October 5, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Bonnie Berch and John Landis moved to Philadelphia from Oakland, Calif., in 2007, so he could join the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Design, where he is now chairman of the Department of City and Regional Planning. The couple bought a 160-year-old German farmhouse in the middle of Chestnut Hill that had lots of history but not enough sunlight for the two West Coast transplants. "We were happy to find the house in Chestnut Hill, but found there was no place to sit and read or eat in natural light," said Berch, a native Californian.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten years ago last week, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia served notice it was going to be a very funny show about very terrible people. The audience was not yet large when the show established that premise, in the first episode, "The Gang Gets Racist," which premiered on Aug. 4, 2005, on FX. Last year, however, with a two-season renewal, It's Always Sunny became the longest-running live-action comedy on cable. It's tied for second of all time with My Three Sons . ( Sunny 's 11th season will premiere next year on FX's sister channel, FXX.)
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Ever since key Iraqi and Syrian cities fell to ISIS last month, the administration has been scrambling to adjust its tactics. Rather than revamp a failed strategy, U.S. officials now appear ready to rely (at least tacitly) on Iran to help roll back the jihadis. This is especially true in Iraq, where Iranian-backed Shiite militias have proven more effective in fighting ISIS than the Iraqi army has. Previously wary of these Shiite militias - lest they inflame sectarian tensions and push more Sunni Iraqis into the ISIS camp - U.S. officials have now dropped objections to their playing a major role.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
After ISIS captured the key Iraqi city of Ramadi last week, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter blamed the stunning loss on "a failure of the Iraqi forces to fight. " Allied air strikes were "effective," he said, but the Iraqis lacked the will to confront ISIS. That careless TV sound bite sums up why the administration's efforts to degrade and defeat ISIS are stalling. You'd never know from Carter's complaint that U.S. tactical and strategic errors, including an ineffective air campaign, contributed mightily to the debacle.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Anyone who wants to understand how ISIS can be rolled back needs to heed the message of two Sunni Arabs who visited Washington this week. I'm not referring to the Saudi crown prince and his deputy, who came to seek assurances from President Obama that he's not cozying up to Tehran. (When it comes to ousting ISIS, the Saudis are as much a part of the problem as they are part of the solution.) Rather, I'm referring to two prominent Iraqi politicians who came to warn that ISIS can't be defeated unless Washington helps Iraqi Sunnis who want to drive the jihadis out. One of the visitors was Rafe al-Issawi, an urbane, English-speaking physician who was once Iraq's respected finance minister.
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