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Sunset

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's hard to tell which aspect of Sunset is sillier, the plot or Bruce Willis' wardrobe. For plot, we have Hollywood 1929, where a studio mogul has imported legendary marshal Wyatt Earp to be technical adviser for a movie based on his exploits and starring legendary screen cowboy Tom Mix. Earp (James Garner) instantly bonds with Mix (Willis). They exchange tall tales and, between drinks, lazily solve a shocking murder. Tell us, what self- respecting screenplay would find humor in the fact that the marshal can ride a horse but not drive a car?
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Painter Dennis Haggerty lives in two worlds. From September to June, he teaches art to youngsters at the West Chester Friends School and lives in a studio a few blocks away. And in the summertime, he lives and works in Taos, N.M., painting landscapes that are widely recognized for the way they capture the colors and atmosphere of the Southwest. A self-described abstract painter, Haggerty has found a broad audience in the Philadelphia area as well as in the Southwest. Indeed, another artist might have given up teaching years ago and devoted himself to painting full- time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
After the Sunset wrestles with one of the thornier social issues of the moment: retirement, and how to pass the days constructively, happily, beneficently. It's tough, after a lifetime of toil, to adjust to unstructured schedules, idle hours, and the finger-drumming silences of a stillborn afternoon. Such is the dilemma facing Max Burdett (Pierce Brosnan) and Lola Cirillo (Salma Hayek). Here they are, a pair of high-end thieves who've called it quits, whiling away their weeks on the Bahamian beaches.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | By Jennifer and Rick Rothacker, FOR THE INQUIRER
Before we embarked for Key West on our honeymoon, we knew watching the sun dive into the Gulf of Mexico was one of the lures of this tiny island paradise. But we weren't sure if margarita-drinking, snorkeling, biking and beach-lying would leave us much time for sunset-gazing. Little did we know that this spectacular daily display of blazing oranges and glowing reds would become the centerpiece of our week. In Key West, the sunset is a celebration, an unfolding drama that is cheered and applauded by the crowds that gather along the Gulf side of the two-by-four-mile island, located about 150 miles from Miami and 90 miles from Cuba.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | By Michael Martin Mills, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To do this right, you must consult the stars. True, even without the proper alignment, Jambiani beach will be exotic and primitive and utterly relaxing. But it won't have the special spell of enchantment that lingers so clearly in my memory, tempting me so often to check the astronomical charts and set out again for Zanzibar. You must be sure to arrange your voyage so as to have a full moon. And it must be a full moon that rises at sunset. And it must be a full moon that rises at sunset on Friday.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal
SOME PEOPLE travel far afield for their summer vacations. But when BalletX cofounder and choreographer Matthew Neenan went to New Zealand in August 2013, it wasn't for play. He and composer Rosie Langabeer were researching the pioneering Trans-Pacific aviator Edwin Musick, who died en route between Hawaii and New Zealand in 1938. Their ballet about Musick and the ill-fated flight, "Sunset, o639 Hours," debuted in 2014 at the Wilma Theater. BalletX will dance it again July 20 to 24 when the company makes its main-stage debut at the prestigious Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival in the Berkshires.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ED HILLE
AS TWILIGHT FALLS SOFTLY on one of the last days of August, the mood at Penn's Landing is serene: A couple embraces, a boat heads for home, and Camden basks in the sunset.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | For The Inquirer / BARBARA JOHNSTON
An October sunset with September weather proved an enticing combination for Chris Aleardi of Havertown, taking in the scene from a kayak at Marsh Creek State Park near Downingtown. Things will cool down considerably just in time for the weekend.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal
SOME PEOPLE travel far afield for their summer vacations. But when BalletX cofounder and choreographer Matthew Neenan went to New Zealand in August 2013, it wasn't for play. He and composer Rosie Langabeer were researching the pioneering Trans-Pacific aviator Edwin Musick, who died en route between Hawaii and New Zealand in 1938. Their ballet about Musick and the ill-fated flight, "Sunset, o639 Hours," debuted in 2014 at the Wilma Theater. BalletX will dance it again July 20 to 24 when the company makes its main-stage debut at the prestigious Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival in the Berkshires.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The skies yielded some pretty colors for sunset in the Philadelphia area Thursday, as predicted by a Pennsylvania State University group that developed a model for forecasting vivid sunsets and sunrises. Some viewers saw stunning tangerine and crimson red streaked across the horizon amid high, wispy clouds. Thursday night's event wasn't quite as good as Wednesday's, when the model predicted - and got - an especially vivid sunset, team member Ben Reppert said. But it was certainly "above average," he added.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Want to catch a colorful sunset? Thursday evening looks promising, says a team of Penn Staters that has designed a program to predict the most spectacular skies. The team - two recent graduates of Pennsylvania State University and a current student - can forecast 32 hours in advance, no longer leaving a beautiful sunset to chance. "It's nice to just go out once in a while and enjoy the beauty of nature around us," said Jacob DeFlitch, 22, a 2015 graduate and a meteorologist at AccuWeather Inc. in State College, Pa. Cirrus clouds - high, thin, wispy puffs - lead to some of the best celestial events, DeFlitch said.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
When World War II Navy veteran Marvin Hume died in April at 94, people wondered whether his family would continue his 40-year tradition of sunset flag-lowering ceremonies that use the casket flag of a different veteran each day of summer. But to his son Larry and the rest of the family, there was never any question of continuing the moving, patriotic, and just a wee bit Jersey Shore kitschy (cue Kate Smith) ceremony near by the little empire of gift shops and a restaurant they own at the tip of the Cape May Peninsula.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARVEY CEDARS, N.J. - If California's Venice Beach is known for its drum circles and stoner sunset gatherings, and Florida's Key West for its Mallory Square theatrics, then what is to be said about the sunset ritual in Harvey Cedars? That you can follow the sunset as it moves from right to left over the course of a summer, ending up almost over the bridge by Labor Day? That the wind tends to die down as the beach day settles into evening, and kids on bikes and dogs on leashes become silhouetted at every street end on the bay side?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raylan Givens has the best lawman swagger since John Wayne. You can sense his Sig Sauer-strapped stride - tall, mythic - enter the room almost before he walks into a building. Created on the page by iconic crime novelist and raconteur Elmore Leonard, but only truly brought to life by Timothy Olyphant, the deputy United States marshal   will take his last steps and draw his last semi-auto pistol 10 p.m. Tuesday on the series finale of FX's Justified after six seasons. Justified came out at just the right time.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
JUST AFTER 6 o'clock on Monday night, about a dozen people were scattered around the meeting room at the Chestnut Hill Friends Meetinghouse, laying on their backs, staring at the ceiling. They stretched out on yoga mats and padded benches in the minimalist, white-walled room, waiting for sunset. The retractable roof opened, exposing the meetinghouse to the elements and providing its inhabitants an unobstructed view of the sky. Then the lights began, multicolored hues that circled the opening in the vaulted ceiling as part of an art installation titled "Greet the Light," which artist James Turrell calls a "skyspace.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2013
Cambodia has joined hands with Australia in an effort to use the Internet to help preserve its fabled Angkor Wat temple complex, the Australian Embassy announced this month. Name: angkorsunsets.com How it works: As part of a master plan to limit damage to the complex, a recently opened website, Angkor Sunset Finder, will give tourists recommendations for where in the 400-square-kilometer (160-square-mile) complex one can watch spectacular sunsets. Why it's needed: A handful of well-publicized spots from which to watch the setting sun attract too many tourists, endangering the place's physical and aesthetic integrity.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
By Sebastian Barajas Graduates are a lot like cicadas. For the first 17 years of life, they are parasites, neither capable nor deserving of doing anything but lying underground, sucking on a tree root. Then comes graduation. They emerge from the Earth, climb from their exoskeleton, and fly off into the sunset. This idea makes everyone happy. It makes graduates happy because they are tired of parents telling them no. It makes parents happy because they desperately want their child to make something of himself.
REAL_ESTATE
May 5, 2013 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
When Sandy and Chris Ross were in Portland, Ore., they lived in a house built for those who buy large suburban dwellings. "Our house was a McMansion, designed for most people who want a front and rear entrance, a dining room, and a recreation room," says Chris Ross, a software engineer. But the Rosses are not most people. When they moved to Bryn Mawr, they wanted a house built to accommodate their family's special needs, limited finances, and environmental awareness. "We didn't have a great amount of money to spend, so we shopped for a site we could afford," says Sandy Ross, a computer-company lawyer.
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